Doctor Who Endorsed Sketchy Joint Pain Supplement Failed To Mention She Was Married To Company’s Owner

Doctor Who Endorsed Sketchy Joint Pain Supplement Failed To Mention She Was Married To Company’s Owner

When you turn on the TV and there are one of those infomercials that pretend to be a talk show, you’re probably justified in questioning the bona fides of anyone endorsing the product being sold. Case in point: A joint pain supplement that not only made unsubstantiated claims about being able to treat medical conditions like fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis, but which failed to mention that the doctor endorsing the supplement also just happened to be married to the company’s owner. [More]

Steven Depolo

Man Charged With Fraud, Accused Of Importing Illegal Sex Drugs

One important consumer lesson that we hope our readers take away from this site is that erectile dysfunction drugs that you find on a gas station counter are never a good idea. An Alabama man has been charged with intentionally defrauding and misleading consumers for importing a drug sold as a “male enhancement product” that contained sildenafil, the active ingredient in Viagra. [More]

Moon Juice

Ad And Supplement Self-Regulation Groups Have Issues With Gwyneth Paltrow’s Favorite Smoothie Dusts

If someone offered you a magic dust that would transform you into actor, mother, and lifestyle advice entrepreneur Gwyneth Paltrow, would you take it? If that doesn’t interest you, what about a powder that claims to be “designed to maintain healthy systems for superior cognitive flow, clarity, memory, creativity, alertness, and the capacity to handle stress”? [More]

Anyone Can Make & Market A Dietary Supplement, Including Consumer Reports

Anyone Can Make & Market A Dietary Supplement, Including Consumer Reports

When you see ads for dietary supplements, there are often scientists in lab coats looking at beakers and flasks, saying science-y things. In the real world, just about anyone with a credit card can make and market a supplement, even one that contains potentially unhealthy ingredients. Just ask our colleagues at Consumer Reports, the creators of the new (totally fake) weight-loss supplement Thinitol. [More]

Frankieleon

15 Dietary Supplement Ingredients To Avoid

Taking a stroll down the dietary supplements aisle can be bewildering, what with the variety of ingredients plastered all over labels, suggesting they can help with this or that ailment. But there are some ingredients out there that may do more harm than good. [More]

Supplement Maker Must Stop Claiming “Elimidrol” Can Relieve Opiate Withdrawal

Supplement Maker Must Stop Claiming “Elimidrol” Can Relieve Opiate Withdrawal

Last year, Sunrise Nutraceuticals was one of more than 100 supplement companies sued by the Federal Trade Commission for allegedly making unfounded health or disease-treatment claims. To settle that suit, Sunrise has agreed to stop falsely claiming that its Elimidrol dietary supplement can alleviate the symptoms of opiate withdrawal. [More]

Amberen Must Stop Claiming Menopause Supplement Is “Proven” To Cause Weight Loss

Amberen Must Stop Claiming Menopause Supplement Is “Proven” To Cause Weight Loss

Last year, the Federal Trade Commission sued Lunada, the makers of the supplement Amberen, alleging that the company did not have the science to back up claims that Amberen was “clinically proven” to cause substantial weight loss, and to alleviate just about every symptom associated with menopause: hot flashes, night sweats, sleep problems, fatigue, and irritability. Now Lunada has agreed to stop making these claims to settle the complaint. [More]

Mike Mozart

GNC Looking To Sell Itself, Other Restructuring Options

Amid declining sales and increased scrutiny on the supplements industry, GNC Holdings is looking to either restructure its business or sell itself.
[More]

CVS Sued Over Claims Its Algae Supplement Improves Memory

CVS Sued Over Claims Its Algae Supplement Improves Memory

Drugstore giant CVS is being sued for marketing and advertising its algae-based Algal-900 DHA supplements as proven memory enhancers, when the science used to prop up that claim is allegedly bogus. [More]

(Frontline)

7 Things You Need To Know From Frontline’s Investigation On Supplements & Safety

They look like drugs, they’re regulated by the Food and Drug Administration, but Frontline‘s new investigation found that supplements are very, very different. [More]

(PepOmint)

If you’re having trouble falling or staying asleep, you may first turn to melatonin, a synthetic version of the hormone that regulates our sleep/wake cycles. It might seem like a mild and natural alternative to sleeping pills, but there are potential problems. The hormone can interact with other medications and have side effects like next-day grogginess, and since it’s regulated as a supplement, its potency may vary. You also may need a much lower dose than what’s in the bottle: as little as .1 mg works for some people. [Consumer Reports]

Supplement-Maker Who Diluted Products With Other Powders Sentenced To 40 Months In Prison

Supplement-Maker Who Diluted Products With Other Powders Sentenced To 40 Months In Prison

When you buy a food product or a dietary supplement, you should be confident that the product’s ingredients are listed on the label, and that you’re getting what you paid for. Federal prosecutors say that one dietary supplement wholesaler in New Jersey spent four years selling products diluted with products like maltodextrin or rice flour, increasing profits but defrauding customers. The company’s owner now must forfeit $1 million in profits and has been sentenced to 40 months in prison and one year of supervised release. [More]

Court Shuts Down Iowa Supplement Company Distribution Over Misbranding, Unfounded Safety Promises

Court Shuts Down Iowa Supplement Company Distribution Over Misbranding, Unfounded Safety Promises

There are about 200 fewer adulterated dietary supplements on the market today after a district court ordered an Iowa company and its owners to stop production of products over allegations the company sold potentially unsafe dietary supplements and falsely advertised them as treatments for diseases ranging from colds to cancer. [More]

Marketers Of Memory Supplement Must Pay $1.4M To Settle Deceptive Advertising Charges

Marketers Of Memory Supplement Must Pay $1.4M To Settle Deceptive Advertising Charges

Using fake news stories and trumped-up, unsubstantiated claims, the marketers of a supplement that claimed to be the answer to memory loss problems sold nearly $100 million worth of the stuff in just a few years. Now they have to fork over $1.4 million to federal and state authorities for making these deceptive statements, and face millions more in penalties if they fail to comply. [More]

FTC: ‘Clinically Proven’ Menopause And Weight Loss Supplement Helps With Neither

FTC: ‘Clinically Proven’ Menopause And Weight Loss Supplement Helps With Neither

American consumers have spent $65 million on Amberen, a supplement meant to ease the symptoms of menopause and perimenopause. These symptoms can include hot flashes, insomnia, irritability, and weight gain. Did Amberen help with these symptoms, as promised? No, the Federal Trade Commission says: it mostly helped to lighten customers’ bank accounts, and has filed a complaint against the company that sells it. [More]

The supplements pictured aren't part of this lawsuit that we know of. (HealthGauge)

Ad Watchdog: Dietary Supplement Claimed To Prevent Cancer

Government regulation of the nutritional supplement industry is not perfect, but the Food and Drug Administration does impose a very important rule on them: products sold as supplements rather than drugs can’t advertise themselves as able to diagnose, treat, prevent, or cure any diseases. Once they do that, they’re drugs. Yet one supplement’s marketing caught the attention of two industry self-regulation bodies before the FDA: a supplement called “Big C” that totally does not promise to prevent cancer. [More]

These are four of the 16 supplements the FDA has targeted in its latest crackdown of dietary supplements with potentially dangerous ingredients.

FDA Continues Crackdown On Dietary Supplement Ingredients, Notifies Makers Of 16 Products To Stop Sales

A week after the Food & Drug Administration heeded calls for action by scientists and health advocates by demanding that dietary supplement makers stop selling products with a speed-like ingredient, the agency sent another warning to 14 manufacturers asking them to cease the sale of several products with another possibly harmful stimulant. [More]

FDA Warns Makers Of Diet Supplements Containing Speed-Like Ingredient

These are four of the eight products cited in the FDA warning letters.

Following calls for action from scientists and consumer health advocates, the FDA has sent warning letters to a handful of diet supplement makers demanding that they cease selling products that contain a speed-like ingredient. [More]