Ford Becomes The Latest To Halt Use Of Scandal-Shadowed Takata Airbags

Ford Becomes The Latest To Halt Use Of Scandal-Shadowed Takata Airbags

In the middle of a massive recall scandal involving airbag inflators that can explode and spew potentially lethal shrapnel at passengers, auto parts company Takata has already lost business from Nissan, Toyota, and Honda. Now comes news that Ford is also ending its use of Takata inflators. [More]

Kia Recalling 256K Soul Compact SUVs Over Possible Steering Failure

Kia Recalling 256K Soul Compact SUVs Over Possible Steering Failure

Cars will take you wherever you want to go — that is, if you can point them in the right direction. That’s why steering is so important, and why Kia Motors is recalling more than 256,000 Soul compact SUVs in the United States, over concern that defective glue could make the steering system fall apart. [More]

(Chris Goldberg)

Rolls-Royce Recalls One Car… Yes, You Read That Right

In the past year, automakers have recalled millions upon millions of vehicle for airbag issues. Bucking that trend is Rolls-Royce, which announced this week that it would recall one car. That’s right a single – very expensive – vehicle because of a problem with the safety device.  [More]

Senators Question Takata’s Ability To Complete Recall Replacement Amid Fines, Lost Customers

Senators Question Takata’s Ability To Complete Recall Replacement Amid Fines, Lost Customers

With Japanese auto parts maker Takata facing a $70 million fine from federal regulators, and car manufacturers ditching the company’s airbags, lawmakers urged the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to ensure the company is able to complete the repairs to millions of vehicles in the event it files for bankruptcy.  [More]

Report: VW Failed To Disclose One Death, Three Injuries To Federal Regulator Database

Report: VW Failed To Disclose One Death, Three Injuries To Federal Regulator Database

Last month it was reported that Volkswagen may have skirted rules that require car manufacturers to report death and injury claims to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. A new analysis of the regulator’s database and lawsuits filed against the company show it failed to report at least one death and three injuries involving its vehicles.  [More]

Report: VW May Have Underreported Deaths, Injuries Related To Vehicle Accidents

Report: VW May Have Underreported Deaths, Injuries Related To Vehicle Accidents

Car manufacturers are required under law to report death and injury claims to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Those figures allow the regulatory agency to identify potentially fatal and dangerous defects. In the last year, the federal agency has investigated reporting inaccuracies related to Honda and Fiat Chrysler. Now, a new report shows that Volkswagen – in the midst of an emissions scandal – may have underreported deaths and injuries relate to its vehicles.  [More]

Regulators Investigating BMW’s Slow Recall Pace After Vehicles Failed Side Crash Tests

Regulators Investigating BMW’s Slow Recall Pace After Vehicles Failed Side Crash Tests

Just two months after federal regulators fined Fiat Chrysler a record $105 million as a result of a lengthy investigation into the carmaker’s leisurely pace in fixing more than 11 million vehicles connected to 23 safety recalls, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is poised to take another manufacturer to task: BMW. [More]

New York Is Now Investigating Volkswagen Recall

New York Is Now Investigating Volkswagen Recall

While federal regulators have yet to publicly confirm a reported criminal investigation into Volkswagen’s alleged attempt to deceive consumers and emissions tests, New York state is letting it be known that it plans to hold the carmaker accountable. [More]

NHTSA Chief: Regulators “Questioning Everything” About Vehicle Recalls, Safety Issues

NHTSA Chief: Regulators “Questioning Everything” About Vehicle Recalls, Safety Issues

Recent high-profile recalls from the likes of Volkswagen, General Motors and other automakers have changed the way federal regulators view safety issues within the auto industry. Instead of viewing some recall initiatives as isolated incidents, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is now going to take a closer look at issues.
[More]

Proposed Keyless Ignition Alert Rule May Have Prevented Carbon Monoxide Deaths

Proposed Keyless Ignition Alert Rule May Have Prevented Carbon Monoxide Deaths

A recently filed lawsuit alleges that 10 automakers concealed the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning in more than five million vehicles with keyless ignitions, resulting in 13 deaths. Meanwhile, a federal regulator’s four-year-old proposal for an alert that could have saved some lives continues to go unimplemented. [More]

Why Don’t Huge Privacy Flaws Result In Recalled Smartphones?

吉姆 Jim Hofman

When a car has a major flaw, like a potentially lethal airbag, it gets recalled. Same for a coffeemaker, or a surfboard, or a prescription drug. But when that major flaw is in a product’s software — like a huge exploit that puts literally a billion consumers’ privacy and personal data at risk — there’s no universal process out there for remedying the situation. Do we need one? And if so, how can we get one? [More]

Fiat Chrysler Receives Record $105 Million Fine For Failure To Address 23 Recalls

Fiat Chrysler Receives Record $105 Million Fine For Failure To Address 23 Recalls

For the second time this year, federal regulators have handed down a record-setting fine to an automaker for failing to properly report and investigate possible defects. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration levied a $105 million fine against Fiat Chrysler, following months of investigations into the car maker’s leisurely pace in fixing more than 11 million vehicles connected to 23 safety recalls. [More]

NHTSA Investigating 250,000 Ford Trucks For Power Brake Failure

NHTSA Investigating 250,000 Ford Trucks For Power Brake Failure

As we mentioned earlier today, brakes are one of the most essential components of a vehicle. When they don’t work as intended, it puts the safety of everyone on the road at risk. For that reason, federal regulators have opened a probe into 250,000 large Ford trucks. [More]

NHTSA Considering Options To Speed Up Takata Airbag Replacement, Seeks Updated Recall Details

NHTSA Considering Options To Speed Up Takata Airbag Replacement, Seeks Updated Recall Details

Now that automakers have identified all 33.8 million vehicles equipped with potential shrapnel-shooting Takata airbags, federal regulators are looking for ways to speed up the repair process. [More]

(photographynatalia)

NHTSA Opens Yet Another Investigation Into Fiat Chrysler, This Time For 121K Dodge Darts For Possible Brake Issues

A week before Fiat Chrysler is schedule to answer for its perceived lackadaisical attitude toward 22 recalls, federal regulators announced they’ve opened a separate investigation into one of the car maker’s vehicles: the Dodge Dart. [More]

Another Report Finds NHTSA Failed To Hold Automakers Responsible For Defects, Other Issues

Another Report Finds NHTSA Failed To Hold Automakers Responsible For Defects, Other Issues

The hits keep on coming for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Less than a month after internal reports determined the agency failed to adequately address the General Motors ignition switch defect that has been linked to more than 100 deaths, an audit from the U.S. Department of Transportation identified a plethora of shortcomings within the auto-safety regulator’s Office of Defects Investigation (ODI) that prevent it from properly protecting consumers from vehicle defects. [More]

How Recalls Work (And Don’t) And Why They’re All So Different

me and the sysop

Manufacturers — of all kinds — usually try hard to get it right on the first try. From banana muffins to bicycle helmets, it’s in a company’s best interests to make their products perfect. Not only is it better for their reputation and their business, but it’s less expensive, in the long run, and causes less trouble. Sometimes, though, something just goes wrong. [More]

NHTSA Once Again Flexes Regulatory Muscle Over GM, Manufacturers Who Used Takata

NHTSA Once Again Flexes Regulatory Muscle Over GM, Manufacturers Who Used Takata

Since taking the helm of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration in January, Mark Rosekind has made his intention to hold automakers responsible for safety issues well known. This week, the agency continued tightening the reins by extending oversight requirements imposed on General Motors stemming from its ignition switch defect and invoking its legal authority to speed up the recall process related to millions of vehicles recalled for Takata airbag defects. [More]