Listener42

Regulators Speeding Up Takata Recall, Update List Of Affected Vehicles

When federal regulators took over the messy Takata airbag recall in May 2015, they provided a timeline in which carmakers were to have shrapnel-shooting safety devices replaced. With more than 42 million vehicles having potentially dangerous airbags in their dashboards and steering wheels, the campaign was bound to take some time. But it’s not progressing enough, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, as it moves to speed up the process by providing a replacement schedule and more complete list of affected vehicles.  [More]

Reddit

Samsung Software Update Will Deliberately ‘Brick’ Remaining Galaxy Note 7 Phones

If you’re one of the few folks still using a recalled, potentially dangerous Samsung Galaxy Note 7, you need to find a replacement soon, as Samsung’s next software update for the Note 7 will render it useless. [More]

NBC Los Angeles

3 Tips To Avoid Buying Counterfeit Goods While Holiday Shopping

It’s hard enough to buy perfect, thoughtful gifts for everyone on your holiday shopping list without having to worry that your hard-earned money is going toward a counterfeit product. But with more and more consumers looking for a good deal online, the likelihood that you’ll eventually come across a bogus-brand coat, tablet, or other gift increases.
[More]

Coca-Cola CEO Muthar Kent To Step Down After 8 Years

Coca-Cola CEO Muthar Kent To Step Down After 8 Years

A week after Starbucks announced the impending departure of CEO Howard Schultz from the company’s top spot, another beverage behemoth is making changes to its executive offices: Coca-Cola CEO Muhtar Kent (pictured on the right) will step down from his position in May 2017.  [More]

Kerry Lannert

In-Flight Cellphone Calls May Finally Be Ready For Takeoff

You know that woman on the mall scream-talking into her cellphone? She could be on your next flight — well, maybe in a few years. After decades of prohibiting airline passengers from yakking away on their cellular devices from 20,000 feet up, federal regulators are mulling the idea of allowing travelers to make cellphone calls while in flight.  [More]

Jeanette E. Spaghetti

State Sues Monsanto For Decades Of Alleged PCB Pollution

The federal government banned the use and production of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in 1979 after determining the chemicals are toxic. However, the state of Washington alleges that Monsanto knew as early as 1937 that the PCBs it produced were dangerous, but that company continued to allow them to pollute the state’s waterways. [More]

(Mike Mozart)

Lawsuit: Sears, JCPenney, Kohl’s & Macy’s Misled Consumers On Sale Prices

In recent years, a spate of retailers have been accused by customers of advertising “false” original prices on discounted or outlet merchandise in order to make consumers believe they are getting a steal of a deal. Now, the city of Los Angeles is joining the fray, suing JCPenney, Kohl’s, Sears, and Macy’s, alleging that in order to increase sales the companies used so-called “false reference pricing.”  [More]

Company Behind “Smart” Vibrator To Settle Claims It Violated Users’ Privacy

Company Behind “Smart” Vibrator To Settle Claims It Violated Users’ Privacy

fweFrom phones to children’s toys and speakers, just about everything can become a “smart” device today. Even vibrators. And just like all of the other devices, sex toys can also violate your privacy. That’s the crux of a soon-to-be settled lawsuit. [More]

KogeLiz

Bristol-Myers Squibb Agrees To Pay $19.5M Over Improper Marketing Of Medication

Prescription medication, when used properly and safely, can provide needed relief to consumers suffering a wide range of illnesses or physical conditions. However, those medications must be marketed and advertised properly. That apparently wasn’t the case for a antipsychotic prescription drug manufactured Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMS). As a result, the company has agreed to pay $19.5 million in a settlement with 42 states and the District of Columbia.  [More]

Chris Wilson

Jimmy John’s To Pay $100K In Illinois Settlement Over Non-Compete Clauses

Earlier this year, Jimmy John’s announced, as part of a settlement with the New York attorney general’s office, that it would stop using strict non-compete clauses preventing workers from taking their sandwich-craft elsewhere, even if they were fired. Now, JJ has entered into a similar agreement with the Illinois attorney general’s office that includes a $100,000 payment to establish education and outreach programs.  [More]

Mike Mozart

Surgeon General: E-Cigarette Use By Young Consumers Is A “Major Public Health Threat”

Months after the Food & Drug Administration finalized rules that treat e-cigarettes like traditional cigarettes and cigars, including banning the sale to minors, a new report from the U.S. Surgeon General suggests the regulations may be too little too late, as use of the alternative tobacco products has skyrocketed among younger consumers, posing a public health threat. [More]

CA Man Who Posed As Immigration Lawyer Charged With Defrauding Consumers

CA Man Who Posed As Immigration Lawyer Charged With Defrauding Consumers

Two weeks after New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, along with a number of immigration advocates, warned all consumers about the possible increased risk of immigration fraud following the recent presidential election, his counterpart in California charged the owner of one such operation that allegedly defrauded countless immigrants.  [More]

Playground Slide Recalled After Kids’ Fingers Amputated

Playground Slide Recalled After Kids’ Fingers Amputated

Park slides can provide immeasurable joy for children (and some adults). And aside from scorching your bare legs on a slide that has been sitting out in the sun, they aren’t supposed to result in any pain. Yet some playground slides are being recalled after two children lost their fingers. [More]

TechStage

Apple Says iPhone Fires In China Are From “External Factors,” Not The Device

In the wake of Samsung’s massive, confusing recall of Galaxy Note 7 devices that could smoke, catch fire, and explode, consumers around the world are drawing attention to similar issues with other smartphones, including some battery fires with iPhones in China. However, Apple contends that these thermal incidents have nothing to do with the design of its signature phone. [More]

Uber Tracks You Even After Your Ride: Invasion Of Privacy Or Necessary?

Uber Tracks You Even After Your Ride: Invasion Of Privacy Or Necessary?

Obviously Uber needs your location to send a car to pick you up, and obviously the service tracks your location during the ride to make sure you get where you’re going. But why does Uber now continue to follow you for five minutes after your ride ends? [More]

(Ko Fujimura)

Starbucks To Add 12,000 Cafes; Use Artificial Intelligence In Ordering App

If you were worried you wouldn’t be able to score your customary morning cup of coffee from Starbucks whilst traipsing around the world, worry not: The coffee giant unveiled plans to add 12,000 more stores globally by 2021. [More]

Mike Mozart

Customers Complain When Walmart Won’t Honor Pricing Error That Listed 70″ TV For $99

If you see a TV that normally sells for $2,000 suddenly listed for sale at $99, you probably know it’s either stolen, worthless, or — most likely — a pricing error. You’re free to try to take advantage of that goof, but you don’t really have much of a legal leg to stand on if they realize the error and cancel your order.
[More]

Google’s New ‘Trusted Contacts’ App Lets Users Keep Tabs On Friends, Family

Google’s New ‘Trusted Contacts’ App Lets Users Keep Tabs On Friends, Family

Two years after Facebook added a safety check feature to let users notify family and friends they were safe after a disaster or public tragedy, Google is following suit, launching its own standalone personal safety app.  [More]