Mark Zuckerberg Says Facebook Is “Not A Media Company,” But He May Be Mistaken

Mark Zuckerberg Says Facebook Is “Not A Media Company,” But He May Be Mistaken

Amazon was once an online bookstore. Now it publishes books, and produces TV shows and movies (just like Netflix, which started as a DVD-by-mail company). Twitter is broadcasting political and sporting events, Apple will soon launch original streaming video content, and Snapchat has gone from a messaging service for sending self-destructing intimate photos to having a programming deal with NBC. Among all this shifting and pivoting, social media king Mark Zuckerberg claims that Facebook is not going to become a media company; he may be mistaken. [More]

(Josh Bassett)

J. Crew & Nordstrom Enter Into Symbiotic Clothes-Selling Relationship

When you’re a clothing line that also has a retail store, you tend to keep your apparel to your own stores. But when you’re a clothing line that could use some new blood, you might make a deal with a retailer that is also in need of an image boost.  [More]

Louis Abate

Want To Sell Big Name-Brand Products Through Amazon? There’s A Fee For That

It’s no secret that online marketplaces like Amazon have a problem with third-party sellers offering counterfeit copies of name-brand products. The company’s latest effort to cut off the stream of fakes involves charging a fee to sellers who want to include certain big-name brands in their stores. [More]

Mike Mozart

Would You Learn To Code At Your Local 7-Eleven?

For better or worse, I’ve spent an awful lot of hours inside of various 7-Eleven stores, but I’ve never learned much outside of how to get the right mix of beverages from the Big Gulp dispenser and how to tell if a hot dog has been on the rollers for too long. Yet elsewhere in the world, people are heading to 7-Eleven to hone their coding skills. [More]

Rachel

Four Airlines Fined For Misinforming Passengers About Compensation For Lost Bags & Being Bumped

If you’re involuntarily bumped from an overbooked flight, or if your bags are lost, the airline owes you some form of compensation. It turns out that four carriers — American, United, Alaska, and Southwest Airlines — haven’t exactly been forthright with all their passengers when it comes to getting what they are owed. [More]

Discrete_Photography

Downsizing Rumors, Wireless Tests, Few Subscribers: What Exactly Is Going With Google Fiber?

In the few markets where it exists — however sparingly — Google Fiber has managed to provide enough of a threat of competition that the nation’s biggest cable/telecom providers have been willing to cut prices and/or improve service. But a number of recent developments, including a report that the Fiber staff is being significantly downsized, have some questioning the future of the service. [More]

Saechang

Today In Hacks: Opera Sync, Voter Databases

If it’s a day that ends in Y, someone who shouldn’t have access to a system is trying to get access to that system. Unfortunately, today there’s news in the air of two big successes for the bad guys. One has hit 1.7 million web browser users; the other, at least 200,000 registered voters.

[More]

California Bars ITT Tech From Enrolling New Students

California Bars ITT Tech From Enrolling New Students

A day after federal regulators barred ITT Education Services from enrolling new students using financial aid at its ITT Technical campuses, a California regulator prohibited the education operator from enrolling all new students at its 15 schools in the state.  [More]

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Senator: EpiPen Generic Announcement “Raises As Many Questions As Solutions”

This morning, drug company Mylan announced that it will soon introduce a lower-cost (but still not cheap) generic version of its popular EpiPen emergency allergy treatment. In response, one senator who has been critical of Mylan’s actions says more must be done to make the life-saving drug available. [More]

Northwest dad

Drone Operators Could Outnumber Private Aviation Pilots In Just One Year

Two months after the Federal Aviation Administration released regulations governing the use of drones, thousands of would-be pilots have lined up to take the test to get licensed to fly on the first day it became available. The rush to fly the unmanned aircraft isn’t just for the novelty, it’s opening the door for new business possibilities for companies and entrepreneurs alike.   [More]

Facebook

Facebook Fires Humans, Hires Robots To Tell You What’s Hot Today

If you’ve ever looked at the Trending Topics in the top right of your Facebook newsfeed, just to see chatter about some video game character right next to news about a massive natural disaster, you’ve probably thought, “who on earth is deciding what shows up here?” Well, now it’s what, not a who, and it… might still need some refining.

[More]

shana berenzweig

Selfies In The Voting Booth? Not So Fast.

When exercising your right to vote for the next President of the United States it might be tempting to document the once-every-four-years event with a selfie. But before you hit the camera button, you should know your state laws, because in some areas of the U.S. the now-popular voting booth selfie is illegal.  [More]

T-Mobile Will Sell One-Day “HD Passes” For $3; Unlimited HD Passes For $25/Month

T-Mobile Will Sell One-Day “HD Passes” For $3; Unlimited HD Passes For $25/Month

Earlier this month, T-Mobile announced it was doing away with multiple data plans. Instead, its new T-Mobile One plan sells voice, data, and text messaging for a single price — with the condition that the speed of the video content streamed to your phone is automatically capped so that it’s not full HD. Now the company that just did away with tiers of service is… introducing a new tier of service: T-Mobile One Plus. [More]

Alan Rappa

Amazon Angers Smaller Sellers With Suspensions

The pages of Amazon are full of third-party sellers using the e-tail giant as a storefront, but a number of small-scale sellers say there’s a growing rift between themselves and Amazon over accounts that the sellers claim are being suspended with little notice and few options for recourse. [More]

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AT&T: FCC Has “No Legal Or Factual Basis” To Issue Us Fine For Overcharging Schools

Back in July, the FCC accused AT&T of badly overcharging some Florida schools for their telecom service. AT&T fired back that the FCC’s claims were meritless and that it looked forward to fighting. AT&T is in this at least as good as its word, and has filed its reply.

[More]

Pre-Cut Veggies Sold In Walmart, Publix, 6 Other Stores, Recalled Over Listeria Concerns

Pre-Cut Veggies Sold In Walmart, Publix, 6 Other Stores, Recalled Over Listeria Concerns

Picking up a package of pre-cut, pre-washed fresh vegetables at the grocery store can make preparing dinner (lunch or breakfast) a bit easier. Unless, of course, you could get sick from those convenient vegetables. Walmart, Publix, and six other retailers have recalled packages of pre-cut veggies over listeria contamination concerns.  [More]

Mylan To Sell Generic EpiPen Pack… For Only $300

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Facing criticism from patients, consumer advocates, lawmakers, and physicians about huge price increases on the EpiPen emergency allergy treatment, drugmaker Mylan today announced it will introduce a generic version of the epinephrine auto-injector for half the current sticker price of the name-brand drug. [More]

Truck Carrying Exploding Takata Airbag Parts Explodes, Kills One Person

Truck Carrying Exploding Takata Airbag Parts Explodes, Kills One Person

The Takata airbag recall began all the way back in 2014, when the dangerously defective combination of propellant and assembly became clear. The shrapnel-shooting airbags have been linked to at least 14 deaths so far. Earlier this month, they sadly claimed a 15th life — but not of anyone who was driving or even inside of a vehicle.

[More]