CPSC Votes To Ban New And Potentially Dangerous Flame Retardants

Flame retardants in our furniture, clothing, and electronics seem like a positive thing, right? Generally, no one wants their home or their clothes — or their kids’ clothes — to catch fire. Yet the Consumer Product Safety Commission had safety in mind when it voted yesterday to outlaw a new type of flame retardants from use on certain products. [More]

5 Things We Learned About How Aldi Can Compete With Grocery Stores

The battle between Aldi and other grocery chains has been raging for a while now; from the price war with Walmart to earmarking $1.6 billion to upgrade stores to be more Whole Foods-esque. But just how can the relatively small supermarket chain compete with bigger chains and win over customers[More]

General Mills Bringing Back “Vibrant” Trix, Including Artificial Flavors & Colors

Two years ago, General Mills joined other food companies by declaring it would cut artificial flavors and colors from all of its cereals. But some customers actually like those additives, at least in their Trix. To that end: The company is making the ultimate “throwback Thursday” offering by announcing it will once again offer Trix with artificial colors and flavors. [More]

Anthropologie Cancels Orders After Accidentally Listing $8,000 Couches For Free

A couch is a big investment — a really nice piece of furniture can cost thousands of dollars. So you can imagine how excited some shoppers were to find Anthropologie selling an $8,000 couch online for… nothing. Alas, that excitement was short-lived, after the company explained that it had all been a mistake. [More]

VW Drivers Claim Company Didn’t Warn Them That Sunroofs May Spontaneously Explode

You’re cruising happily down the highway with the sun streaming through your sunroof when suddenly, there’s a loud noise and glass is exploding everywhere. Sounds scary, right? That’s what Volkswagen owners say in a new lawsuit accusing the company of failing to warn them that this could possibly happen in a slew of vehicles. [More]

CVS Limiting Opioid Prescriptions Amid National Addiction Epidemic

Opioid prescription rates have more than tripled in the last two decades contributing to the nation’s current opioid addiction crisis, according to CVS. Now, the country’s largest pharmacy chain plans to do something about it by limiting opioid prescriptions.  [More]

Everyone Hates Newest Obamacare Repeal Bill; Senate Plans Vote Next Week Anyway

After a politically chaotic summer where their first attempt met a dramatic late-night demise, Republican members of the Senate are mounting one last effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Basically every major stakeholder in the country has announced its opposition to the new bill, but the Senate is racing to squeeze in a vote before a hard deadline at the end of the month just the same. [More]

The iOS 11 Control Center Doesn’t Really Turn Off WiFi Or Bluetooth

During Apple’s announcement earlier this month of new products, there was also something for users who are happy with their old devices: A new version of the company’s operating system for phones and tablets, iOS 11. However, one handy feature of the new operating system — a menu that lets users quickly access certain functions at any time by swiping up — doesn’t actually work the way it appears to. [More]

Is Experian Letting Anyone Access Your Credit Freeze PIN?

Placing a credit freeze on your accounts following a hack or issue with identity theft is only effective if the credit reporting agency you’re working with doesn’t give ne’er-do-wells the ability to unfreeze the accounts by providing the same information that any good ID thief already knows about you. This is a lesson some victims of Equifax’s recent data breach are learning after freezing their accounts with fellow credit reporting agency Experian.  [More]

So, The Equifax Hack Actually Started Back In March

Two weeks ago, credit agency Equifax announced an unprecedented breach of consumer personal data where records for 143 million customers in the United States alone were stolen. Equifax told the world that it discovered the breach in July, and it began in May. Turns out that the second half of that statement isn’t quite true. [More]

UPDATE: Company Apologizes To Customer Who Found Employee ID Badge In Her Jerky

Earlier this week, we brought you the tale of a Consumerist reader who was stymied by the presence of what appeared to be an employee ID badge in a bag of beef jerky she’d purchased. After our story ran, the company reached out to our reader with apologies for her “very negative experience” and something of an explanation about what happened. [More]

Death Wish Nitro Cold Brew Coffee Recalled Over Botulism Risk

There’s strong coffee, and then there’s really strong coffee. If you were planning to drink a can the world’s purported strongest coffee, you might want to think again: Death Wish Coffee has issued the recall of certain  cans of its nitro cold brew after discovering they could contain a deadly toxin.  [More]

Apple Admits Its Brand-New Watch Has Trouble Connecting To Cell Service

While Apple has been busy bragging about the fact that its new Series 3 smart watch has integrated cellular communication capabilities — meaning you don’t need to connect it with your phone anymore — just before it starts shipping those devices, the company is admitting that they’re having LTE connectivity problems. [More]

Albertsons Buys Plated, Plans To Bring Meal Kits To Grocery Stores

Just when you thought the popularity surrounding meal kits was cooling down, grocery stores have jumped into the ring, creating their own version of the convenient pre-selected, pre-proportioned boxes of ingredients. But Albertsons Co. — operator of supermarkets like Safeway and Jewel-Osco — is taking a different road: It’s simply buying an existing meal kit service, Plated.  [More]

Cases Of KIND Bars Recalled For Lack Of Walnut Declaration

Tree nuts like walnuts can trigger life-threatening allergies, and they’re one of the food items that must be declared on the outside of the food package. Cases of KIND chocolate and nut bars had that declaration on each bar, but the company is now notifying customers that the exterior cartons lacked the declaration.

[More]

Target Debuts Maps Of Stores So You Don’t Have To Talk To Employees

Big box stores are, well, big. So big, in fact, you might get lost looking for the toilet paper. But instead of sheepishly approaching an employee, you can now just follow the map on your phone — at Target, anyway.  [More]

Judge Gives D-Link Partial Win In FTC Case Over Vulnerable Devices

Back in January, the Federal Trade Commission filed a case against D-Link, a company that makes networking equipment and connected-home devices. It alleged that D-Link deceptively marketed its products as advanced and safe when they were vulnerable to attacks that range from stealing personal information to peeping through security cameras. This week, a judge dismissed three of the counts from the FTC’s case, noting that the agency didn’t present any consumers who were actually harmed.  [More]