debt collection

aresauburn™

Debt Collector Accused Of Taking Money From People Who Didn’t Owe Anything

As part of its ongoing efforts to crack down on unscrupulous debt collectors, the Federal Trade Commission has accused a North Carolina company of running a “phantom” debt collection scheme that went after people for money that they did not actually owe. [More]

Adam Fagen

Feds Sue Debt Collector That Allegedly Misrepresented Attorney Involvement

Under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, it is illegal for debt collection firms to use false, deceptive, or misleading representations to collect a debt. One Ohio company apparently didn’t follow this rule when sending consumers letters that claimed attorneys were involved in the collection of their debts, and now it’s facing a lawsuit from federal regulators. [More]

Navient Claims It’s Under No Obligation To Help Student Loan Borrowers

Navient Claims It’s Under No Obligation To Help Student Loan Borrowers

Navient, the largest student loan servicer in the country, is here to simply collect your monthly education loan payments, not help you find ways to more easily afford those payments.  [More]

pshorten

Student Loan Debt Collectors Not Eager To Charge Fees Reinstated By Trump Administration

The Department of Education recently advised companies that collect debt on billions of dollars in outstanding federal student loans that they can once again charge a large penalty fee to defaulted borrowers. However, the collectors — even one that is currently suing the government for the right to charge this fee — now say they will not automatically add thousands of dollars in additional debt to loans in default.  [More]

Former Lobbyist, Son Of Student Loan Debt-Collector, Resigns From Dept. Of Education

Former Lobbyist, Son Of Student Loan Debt-Collector, Resigns From Dept. Of Education

In our recent story on the Trump administration’s decision to roll back protections for potentially millions of student loan borrowers, we also told you about new Department of Education advisor Taylor Hansen, a former lobbyist for the for-profit college industry whose father is the CEO of a student loan debt collection company that has been suing Taylor’s new employer since 2015 for the right to charge thousands of dollars in fees to people who are already having trouble paying back their loans. Now comes news that Hansen’s brief life as a federal employee has come to an end. [More]

Feds Sue Debt Relief Law Firm For Charging Customers Illegal Fees

Feds Sue Debt Relief Law Firm For Charging Customers Illegal Fees

Nearly four years ago, federal regulators shut down a debt relief company — Morgan Drexen — accused of deceiving customers with promises of reducing their debt and charging illegal upfront fees to do so. While that company eventually paid $170 million to resolve the allegations, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Monday sued a related company using the same playbook.  [More]

Steven Depolo

1-In-4 Consumers Contacted By Debt Collectors Feel Threatened

More than 70 million Americans are contacted by a debt collector or creditor each year. While those debt collectors have a job — to get borrowers to repay on their overdue debts — some have used illegal tactics, such as threatening lawsuits, arrests, or contacting consumers’ employers or family members. Now, a new report by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau finds that harassment by these collectors is all too common.  [More]

Navy Federal Credit Union Ordered To Pay $28.5M Over Bad Debt Collection Practices

Navy Federal Credit Union Ordered To Pay $28.5M Over Bad Debt Collection Practices

Navy Federal Credit Union offers customers — current and former military servicemembers and their families — a wide range of financial products and services, including loans that must be repaid. But when those customers fell behind on those payments, federal regulators allege that NFCU illegally threatened borrowers and restricted access to their accounts. To resolve these allegations, the company must now pay $28.5 million in refunds and penalties. [More]

More Than A Year After Corinthian Collapse, Students Still Waiting For Financial Aid Help

More Than A Year After Corinthian Collapse, Students Still Waiting For Financial Aid Help

Eighteen months after Corinthian Colleges Inc. completed its collapse – closing the remaining Heald College, Wyotech, and Everest University – tens of thousands of former students are still waiting to received some form of relief from the mountains of student loan debt they incurred to attend the defunct college.  [More]

Kieron Beard

Debt Collector Gets Out Of Lawsuit… By Buying The Lawsuit Out From Under The Plaintiff

When you sue a debt collector for allegedly violating federal law, that collector can’t just go behind your back, buy the debt on the cheap at auction and get the whole case dismissed, can it? That tactic worked for one collection agency and, depending on how a federal appeals court rules, it could lead to many other debt collectors buying their way out of legal trouble. [More]

Joe M. O'Connell

What You Need To Know About New Rules Allowing Debt Collection Robocalls From Feds

If you ask any American to name the things they love the most, they are sure to reply, “debt collectors, intrusive pre-recorded phone calls, and the federal government!” So today — under orders to do so from a piece of rushed, tacked-on legislation — the Federal Communications Commission released its final rules allowing the federal government and some of its contractors to make debt-collection robocalls to wireless lines. [More]

Xavier J. Peg

New Rules Would Require Debt Collectors Have Proof You Actually Owe Money

One of the most common complaints about debt collectors is that they harass people over debts that are either no longer owed, or weren’t owed in the first place. Federal regulators are now proposing rules that — among other protections — would cut down on these annoying, bogus collections actions by requiring that debt collectors have some sort of evidence that the person they are calling actually owes money. [More]

Dan Coulter

Petition Calls On FCC To Rethink Ruling Giving All Govt. Contractors Green Light To Make Robocalls

Earlier this month, the FCC released a controversial ruling, concluding that the law allowed the federal government — and all contractors working for the government — to place prerecorded/auto-dialed robocalls to consumers, so long as the calls are made for official government business. Today, a number of consumer advocates have officially petitioned the FCC to rethink its position and close this loophole. [More]

inajeep

FCC Confirms: Entire U.S. Government Allowed To Place Annoying Robocalls

Last fall, Congress passed — and the President signed — an emergency budget bill that opened up a loophole that allows federal agencies, and private companies working on the government’s behalf, to make debt collection robocalls. However, a recently released ruling from the Federal Communications Commissions makes it clear that the entire U.S. government is exempt from rules limiting the use of robocalls to American consumers, so long at it involves government business. [More]

John Oliver Buys $15M In Medical Debt, Then Forgives It

John Oliver Buys $15M In Medical Debt, Then Forgives It

We can tell you about the growing problem of medical debt and how hospitals are suing thousands of patients for having the gall to be both sick and poor, or how debt collectors screw-up and use illegal tactics to get paid for debts they often can’t even prove that anyone owes. But that’s nothing compared to the sight of a goofy English guy forgiving $15 million in medical debt he bought for pennies on the dollar. [More]

Nonprofit Hospitals Suing Poor Patients Without Telling Them They Qualify For Reduced Or Free Care

Nonprofit Hospitals Suing Poor Patients Without Telling Them They Qualify For Reduced Or Free Care

Given that nonprofit hospitals are tax-exempt, the general view is that their primary focus should be on providing care for those who need it rather than making using the court system to make those patients pay up. Almost all of these hospitals have programs to reduce bills for people living below or near the poverty line, but some are suing poor patients without ever telling them about these options. [More]

Dan Coulter

Here’s How To Tell The FCC How You Feel About New Debt Collection Robocall Loophole

Now that the government has carved out a loophole allowing it to place automated and/or pre-recorded robocalls to consumers to collect any debts owed to the federal government, the FCC is trying to come up with robocall rules that aren’t entirely awful. Consumers have a short window of time to chime in on these rules, so here’s how to share your feelings with the FCC. [More]

afagen

Supreme Court OKs Private Debt Collectors’ Use Of Prosecutors’ Letterhead To Make People Pay

What’s more likely to get you to pay a questionable debt: A notice from some debt collection company you’ve never heard of, or a letter from your state’s attorney general about that same debt? Some states allow certain private, for-profit debt collectors to use prosecutors’ letterhead in correspondence with consumers about debts, even though the American Bar Association looks down on the practice. This morning, the U.S. Supreme Court chimed in on the debate, unanimously giving its SCOTUS seal of approval, at least when it’s done with the state’s approval. [More]