nikony13

People Have Finally Figured Out That They Don’t Need To Wait In Line For An iPhone

Apple’s iPhone has been with us for ten years now, and Apple fans have gradually come to realize an important truth. No, not anything about iPhones themselves: They’ve come to realize that they don’t need to actually wait in line overnight on release day to get a device. [More]

Neff Conner

More Regular Hotels Discover The Joy Of Charging ‘Resort Fees’ For Normal Amenities

Travelers don’t necessarily expect to see resort fees, or extra expenses added to their bills for things that other hotels include in the bill, when staying at a hotel. It turns out, however, that this is an increasingly common practice. It lets hotels advertise lower rates and impose fees when guests get there. [More]

App That Promised To Pay Users For Fitness Trapped Some On Erroneous Payment Treadmill

App That Promised To Pay Users For Fitness Trapped Some On Erroneous Payment Treadmill

The mobile app GymPact, later known as Pact, was a tool that gave users a financial incentive to exercise, eat fruits and vegetables, and to log what they ate. Only the Federal Trade Commission claims that Pact users were charged when they weren’t supposed to be, and some lost hundreds of dollars in a negative-option mess that they couldn’t cancel. [More]

Kevin Irvine

Consumerist Friday Flickr Finds

Here are five of the best photos that readers added to the Consumerist Flickr Pool in the last week, picked for usability in a Consumerist post or for just plain neatness. [More]

Great Beyond

CPSC Inches Closer To Possible Ban On New And Potentially Dangerous Flame Retardants

Flame retardants in our furniture, clothing, and electronics seem like a positive thing, right? Generally, no one wants their home or their clothes — or their kids’ clothes — to catch fire. Yet the Consumer Product Safety Commission had safety in mind when it voted yesterday to start rulemaking that could outlaw a new type of flame retardants from use on certain products. [More]

The iOS 11 Control Center Doesn’t Really Turn Off WiFi Or Bluetooth

The iOS 11 Control Center Doesn’t Really Turn Off WiFi Or Bluetooth

During Apple’s announcement earlier this month of new products, there was also something for users who are happy with their old devices: A new version of the company’s operating system for phones and tablets, iOS 11. However, one handy feature of the new operating system — a menu that lets users quickly access certain functions at any time by swiping up — doesn’t actually work the way it appears to. [More]

Sol Es

So, The Equifax Hack Actually Started Back In March

Two weeks ago, credit agency Equifax announced an unprecedented breach of consumer personal data where records for 143 million customers in the United States alone were stolen. Equifax told the world that it discovered the breach in July, and it began in May. Turns out that the second half of that statement isn’t quite true. [More]

Kind Snacks

Cases Of KIND Bars Recalled For Lack Of Walnut Declaration

Tree nuts like walnuts can trigger life-threatening allergies, and they’re one of the food items that must be declared on the outside of the food package. Cases of KIND chocolate and nut bars had that declaration on each bar, but the company is now notifying customers that the exterior cartons lacked the declaration.

[More]

Judge Gives D-Link Partial Win In FTC Case Over Vulnerable Devices

Judge Gives D-Link Partial Win In FTC Case Over Vulnerable Devices

Back in January, the Federal Trade Commission filed a case against D-Link, a company that makes networking equipment and connected-home devices. It alleged that D-Link deceptively marketed its products as advanced and safe when they were vulnerable to attacks that range from stealing personal information to peeping through security cameras. This week, a judge dismissed three of the counts from the FTC’s case, noting that the agency didn’t present any consumers who were actually harmed.  [More]

Karen Chappell

American Airlines CEO Says It Will Totally Match Discount Carriers’ Fares, Won’t Say How

With discount airlines expanding and competing on more of their routes, how can legacy carriers stay competitive? Their latest bid to stay ahead of discount airlines is to lower fares, including the controversial Basic Economy fares, and price-matching competitors. [More]

Patrick

T-Mobile Raises Limit For ‘Unlimited’ Data

Savvy mobile data users know that “unlimited” does have its limits: Plans that promise unlimited data are selling only theoretically unlimited data. That’s because all carriers reserve the right to drastically cut users’ connection speed to 2G or 3G if they go over this semi-invisible limit. Now T-Mobile is raising this threshold for its for its customers, from 32 GB to 50 GB. [More]

Rrravenita

Crocs Have Made A Comeback By Returning To Hideous Roots

Crocs, a brand of footwear known for being comfortable, non-slip, unattractive, and incompatible with escalators, has made a comeback. The secret has been going back to the thing that made it a success in the first place: Hideous clogs that you can easily hose off. [More]

Mike Mozart

FTC Approves Walgreens’ Acquisition Of Half Of Rite Aid’s Stores

If there’s a Rite Aid store in your neighborhood, the odds are about even that there won’t be for long. The Federal Trade Commission has finally approved a deal between the No. 2 and No. 3 drugstore chains in the country, Walgreens and Rite Aid. Instead of acquiring the smaller chain, Walgreens Boots Alliance will buy around half of its stores. [More]

Font del Vi

Young Living Sentenced For Harvesting Essential Oils From Endangered Plants

Essential oils come from exotic plants all over the world, but do the companies selling these oils have the proper permits to import and sell the products made from them? The company Young Living has been sentenced for importing rosewood oil and spikenard oil without permission, and must pay $760,000 for importing the products without permits. [More]

Eric Caballero

Mysterious Cash-Flusher In Switzerland Remains At Large

Why would someone need to dispose of a huge amount of cash — tens of thousands of euros — very quickly? That’s what authorities in Geneva, Switzerland, want to know, after finding wads of foreign cash clogging toilets at a bank and at restaurants around the city. [More]

Nicholas DiMaio

Toys ‘R’ Us Expected To File For Bankruptcy This Week

After Hack, Registry-Cleaning App CCleaner Infected Users With Malware

After Hack, Registry-Cleaning App CCleaner Infected Users With Malware

When you download an app meant to clean your computer, you assume that it’s supposed to remove junk from your machine, not add more. Yet for about a month, downloads of the popular program CCleaner came with a free bonus dose of malware, installed on millions of PCs around the world. [More]

Mike Mozart

Payless Won’t Accept A Gift Card I Bought Online. Is It Because Of Their Bankruptcy?

Is Payless ShoeSource trying to recover from bankruptcy by discouraging customers from ever redeeming their gift cards? A Consumerist reader bought a discounted gift card from a card exchange site, then was annoyed when his local Payless store wouldn’t accept it. The retailer says that it accepts virtual gift cards in its stores, but only from certain vendors, and only after taking very specific anti-fraud measures. [More]