Best Buy Will Bring Back Free Shipping On All Online Purchases

When does the “holiday season” begin? Apparently, for Best Buy, it still begins in late October. The Minnesota-based electronics retailer is re-introducing free shipping for the holiday shopping season, from now through Dec. 24. We’re in the holiday shopping season? Does Best Buy sell Halloween costumes now? [More]


Airbnb Sues New York Over New Short-Term Rentals Law, State Won’t Enforce It Yet

The latest govermnent to impose rules on short-term rental site Airnbnb is New York: while the law is statewide, it’s mostly intended to clamp down on whole-apartment rentals that critics say are affecting the supply and prices of housing in New York City. The governor signed the law on Friday, and Airbnb immediately sued. Now the state won’t enforce the law until the lawsuit has been resolved. [More]

Breakfast Cereals In Girl Scout Cookie Flavors Are Now A Thing

Breakfast Cereals In Girl Scout Cookie Flavors Are Now A Thing

The Girl Scout Cookie marketing train runs year-round, even if the cookies themselves are only available for a limited period every year. The Scouts have been licensing their brand names and flavors for a while now, resulting in derivative products like licensed toy cookie ovens, lip balm, and licensed ice cream bars. Now they’ll be available as a licensed breakfast cereal from General Mills. [More]


The Inside Story Of How Samsung Botched The Galaxy Note 7 Recall

One important decision by Samsung executives turned the Galaxy Note 7 from a big but manageable product defect to a brand-destroying disaster. Reports from all over the world were coming in of Galaxy Note 7 fires, along with pressure from mobile carriers and from customers to do something about it. Yet the company didn’t know exactly what was causing the batteries to explode. [More]


REI Tells Everyone To Go Play Outside On Black Friday Again

While other retailers debate whether they should open on Thanksgiving Day or not, last year outdoor gear co-op REI had a novel idea: it wouldn’t just keep its doors closed on the holiday, but it would close on the biggest shopping day of the year as well. That apparently worked out for them, and the retailer is doing the same again this year. [More]


Report: Dick’s Won Auction For Golfsmith’s Intellectual Property, U.S. Stores

According to “a person familiar with the matter,” Dick’s Sporting Goods picked up the U.S. business and intellectual property of bankrupt specialty retailer Golfsmith for $70 million, as expected. Serving as its caddies for this round were well-known names in the retail liquidation business, Hilco Global and Tiger Capital Group. [More]

Scott Lynch

The ATM Liability Shift Is Here, And Most Don’t Have Chip Readers

Hey, remember the ATM liability shift? You know, how MasterCard’s liability shift means that the operator of any ATMs not equipped with EMV (computer chip) card readers by October of this year would be liable for fraud, and not the credit card network. That deadline was today, and most ATMs in the wild aren’t yet equipped with chip readers. [More]

Phillip Jeffrey

How Bad Test Results From Theranos Led To Bad Real-Life Consequences For Patients

Something as simple and routine as a blood test can have life-changing consequences, and some patients whose test results from medical startup Theranos were later found to be inaccurate faced stress and worry, had to be re-tested, and made life-altering medical decisions based on wrong information. What did that look like in real life? [More]

Keegan Berry

7 Things We Learned About The History Of The Slurpee

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Slurpee, which grew along with 7-Eleven to become the preeminent frozen sugary beverage in this country, and perhaps in the world. Like any product that old, the Slurpee has a fascinating history. [More]

Jay Adan

Liberty Mutual Settles Over Ads For Accident Forgiveness Insurance Where It Isn’t Allowed

Accident forgiveness in auto insurance is a pretty simple concept: while plans that have the feature cost more, your insurance company can’t hike your premiums after you get in a crash and actually need the insurance. It also happens to be illegal in California, which is why the district attorneys in San Diego, Riverside, and Los Angeles counties filed a consumer protection lawsuit against Liberty Mutual over ads touting the feature, which it settled for $925,000. [More]

Keoni Cabral

Consumerist Friday Flickr Finds

Here are five of the best photos that readers added to the Consumerist Flickr Pool in the last week, picked for usability in a Consumerist post or for just plain neatness. [More]

Backpage Executives Seek Dismissal Of Pimping Charges

Backpage Executives Seek Dismissal Of Pimping Charges

Earlier this month, the Attorney General of California took the unusual step of charging the CEO of classifieds site Backpage and two of the company’s major shareholders with pimping and conspiracy to commit pimping. At the time, AG Kamala Harris said that Backpage was “unlawfully designed…to be the world’s top online brothel.” Now the company’s lawyers are seeking dismissal of those charges. [More]

Glyn Lowe Photoworks

Authorities In Detroit Investigating Hepatitis A Cases Linked To Whole Foods

Public health authorities in Detroit are raising the food safety alarm: anyone who bought prepared food at the Whole Foods store at 115 Mack Ave in midtown should seek medical attention, since they may have been exposed to Hepatitis A. While details are fuzzy, they know that the span from Oct. 6-10 is when any exposure would have happened. [More]

Watkins Lawsuit Over Pepper Tin Sizes Will Go Forward In Federal Court

Watkins Lawsuit Over Pepper Tin Sizes Will Go Forward In Federal Court

If the outside of a food package is the same, especially for a food you don’t buy very often, do you notice? Longtime Consumerist readers might, but most people wouldn’t. Last year, spice giant McCormick quietly shrank down the contents of its boxes of black pepper, but kept using the same size container. Tiny competitor Watkins noticed, and filed a federal lawsuit against McCormick accusing it of false advertising. A judge decided this week that the lawsuit could go forward. [More]

More Companies Turn To Mandatory Arbitration: CreditKarma, Redbox, Kitty Bed Maker

More Companies Turn To Mandatory Arbitration: CreditKarma, Redbox, Kitty Bed Maker

People in a wide variety of circumstances, from drivers signing up to work for Uber to senior citizens entering a nursing home, sign mandatory binding arbitration agreements. Two popular online services have recently started to require that customer disputes go to arbitration, and a reader sent along a product purchased online — a cat bed — that came with a arbitration agreement of its own. [More]


Galaxy Note 7 Owners Unhappy With Samsung’s Handling Of Global Recall

One of the early victims of an exploding Samsung Galaxy Note 7 said that the company offered to cover his expenses, including damage to the hotel room he was staying in at the time his phone caught fire. Now that the phone has been officially recalled and Samsung is in crisis, customers report that Samsung hasn’t handled customers whose phones have actually caught fire very well. [More]

Nicholas Eckhart

Report: Kroger Isn’t Interested In Buying A Few Hundred Walgreens Stores

If you know anyone who’s interested in buying around 650 grocery stores, Walgreens and Rite Aid would like to hear about it. The two drugstore chains need to find a buyer for between 500 and 1,000 stores to get their merger approved by the Federal Trade Commission, and no one is interested. [More]