Consumer Reports Finds Serious Security Flaws In Fertility App Glow

Consumer Reports Finds Serious Security Flaws In Fertility App Glow

The fertility-tracking app Glow collects detailed information about users’ bodies and sex lives, and one thing that may not occur to users is the possibility that their data could be compromised. No, not just if someone swiped their phone or broke into their account: our colleagues down the hall at Consumer Reports discovered some serious security flaws in the app, which Glow has now fixed. [More]

Ryan

Panera Restaurant Shut Down Due To High Carbon Monoxide Levels

When you hear about a restaurant being shut down for a health hazard, you might assume that it’s because of an outbreak of illness, or because someone barfed. A Panera restaurant in Seekonk, MA closed down today to protect everyone after a carbon monoxide leak in the restaurant made 18 customers sick. [More]

Mercedes Pulls Potentially Confusing Ads For 2017 E-Class That Call The Car ‘Self-Driving’

Mercedes Pulls Potentially Confusing Ads For 2017 E-Class That Call The Car ‘Self-Driving’

Fully autonomous cars will be available to consumers someday, but not yet. After consumer advocates, including our own parent organization, Consumer Reports, complained to Mercedes and to the Federal Trade Commission about the misleading nature of an ad that shows off a new model’s driver-assist features. The car isn’t autonomous, but advocates were concerned that the ads imply that it is. [More]

Nicholas Eckhart

Kmart Realizes Maybe It Should Try Communicating With Its Own Employees

Last weekend, a story hit the Internet about the current fears of Kmart employees that they’re being asked to move all stock to the sales floor because the company is in slow-motion liquidation. The communications staff at Kmart’s parent company, Sears Holdings, realized that they had to do something when news outlets began sending them questons about the employees’ accounts. Maybe they also needed to communicate a little better with store employees. [More]

How Scalpers Make More Money Off Broadway’s ‘Hamilton’ Than The Show’s Producers

How Scalpers Make More Money Off Broadway’s ‘Hamilton’ Than The Show’s Producers

There’s good news for impatient theater fans who want to see the hit Broadway show “Hamilton.” After ticket prices peaked between this year’s Tony awards on June 12 and the departure of some original cast members a month later, they’ve now plummeted… to only about six to ten times their original face value. [More]

Nicholas Eckhart

NM Politician Spots New, Destroyed Sneakers In Trash At Sports Authority Store Closing Sale

Politicians are regular people who do mundane things like check out store-closing sales at national sporting goods retailers. A New Mexico state representative spotted shoes that had been deliberately destroyed tossed in the dumpster outside of a closing Albuquerque Sports Authority store, and was angry that good shoes had deliberately been destroyed. [More]

Ashi Fachler

Consumerist Friday Flickr Finds

Here are five of the best photos that readers added to the Consumerist Flickr Pool in the last week, picked for usability in a Consumerist post or for just plain neatness. [More]

Ripple Rug

5 Things We Learned About The Not-So-Mysterious Business Of E-Commerce Arbitrage

We’ve written about the practice of arbitrage in e-commerce in the past. Arbitrage is when you take advantage of different prices for the same items in different places, and make money by buying it from one place and reselling it in another. E-commerce has created a new variation on this business: people who receive orders from one site, order the items for their customers on another, and then ship directly, serving as a middleman. [More]

Kent Kanouse

To Prevent Poisoned Kids, Lock Up Both The Pot Brownies And The Toothpaste

When something becomes legal, it becomes more common in citizens’ homes. That’s why it’s not surprising that a study shows an increase in treatment for accidental poisonings of children in Colorado after recreational marijuana became legal to buy and sell there in 2014. Yet while this serves as an important reminder to caregivers to lock up their infused brownies, children are still most likely to be poisoned by ordinary household products like cleaning supplies and over-the-counter medications. [More]

Ryan Finnie

New Vizio Owner LeEco Is In The Ecosystem Business, Not The Gadget Business

Earlier this week, TV-maker Vizio announced that it had been acquired by the Chinese company LeEco. “Who?” you might have said. Even people in China would have said the same thing until a few years ago, but now the company is a conglomerate that sells streaming video and smartphones, and electric cars. [More]

spikenheimer

Target Ends Sponsorship Of IndyCar Team, Keeps NASCAR Team Deal For Now

Discount chain Target has sponsored an IndyCar team for 27 years, one of the longest-running such sponsorships in all of sports. While it’s weird to see drivers with literal bullseyes on their backs, the partnership with Chip Ganassi Racing has led to lots of publicity and lots of wins. However, Target announced that it will end at the end of this season. [More]

Nicholas Eckhart

Consignment Deals Don’t Work So Well When Retailers Go Bankrupt

It’s time for retailers to start placing their orders for the items that will be on shelves during this holiday season, but one thing may be different from last year: they may be ordering less merchandise on consignment after millions of dollars’ worth of merchandise was stuck in legal limbo during the bankruptcy of big-box sporting goods retailer Sports Authority. [More]

Jeepers Media

Here’s A Letter Verizon Wireless Sent To A User Of ‘Extraordinary Amounts’ Of Data

Verizon Wireless brought back nominally unlimited mobile data by letting users have access just fast enough to check e-mail and make text posts to Facebook once they’re run through their data allotment, but what the company really wants is to get customers who still have unlimited data off their network for good. They’re starting with friendly letters to heavy users. [More]

wyliepoon

Terrible Landlord Accused Of Harassing, Literally Freezing Out Tenants

The landlord in East Harlem in New York City wanted the last rent-stabilized tenants out. The rest of the building was being renovated to attract market-rate tenants, but the family with five kids just wouldn’t leave, even after the five other households in the building did. Now the landlord has been arrested and accused of harassing the family and endangering their children. [More]

jojoling

Starbucks Denies Reports That It’s Slashing Hours Chain-Wide

While Starbucks announced planned raises for employees and a loosened dress code, those changes came in the middle of rampant chain-wide unhappiness among baristas. More pay per hour doesn’t help if you can’t actually get scheduled to work, and employees complain that hours have been cut at the stores where they work. [More]

Nintendo

Nintendo Delays Pokémon Go Wearable Release Until September

Pokémon Go fever is now global, but the frenzy over the game will eventually fizzle out a bit. That’s inevitable. That’s why it’s a bad sign that Nintendo has announced that a new wearable device that goes with the game has been delayed by two months. [More]

Juliana Thomas for International AIDS Vaccine Initiative

Warning To Patients: No One Actually Vets Clinical Trials Listed In Government Database

When you have an impossible medical problem or don’t like the treatment solutions available to you, it makes sense to turn to the very latest treatments, including those so new that they’re still in clinical trials. The problem is that the biggest listing of clinical trials simply shares the info without vetting it, and patients who don’t know better could have to pay huge amounts of money. [More]

State Farm

State Farm Already Figuring Out How To Insure Autonomous Cars

If error by fallible human drivers causes 90% of car crashes, what will happen in the future when most or all of the cars on the road are autonomous? Insurance companies are already working on the answer to that question, and one of them, State Farm, had a few years’ head start. [More]