Google Fiber Looking To Expand To 9 New Markets

The markets in green either currently offer Google Fiber or are in the process of building the network. The markets in red are the possible expansion cities for Google Fiber.

The markets in green either currently offer Google Fiber or are in the process of building the network. The markets in red are the possible expansion cities for Google Fiber.

While lawmakers hungry for cable industry dollars have been trying to fight the growth of third-party fiberoptic service providers, the folks at Google continue their slow expansion of Google Fiber service with the news today that the company hopes to bring Fiber to nine new metro areas.

Google launched Fiber in Kansas City and recently began expanding service to customers in Austin, TX, and Provo, Utah. And according to an announcement made earlier today, the company is in discussions to bring the gigabit broadband service to the following areas (cities in parentheses would be included within that metro area, according to Google):

Atlanta (Avondale Estates, Brookhaven, College Park, Decatur, East Point, Hapeville, Sandy Springs, Smyrna)
Phoenix (Scottsdale, Tempe)
San Jose (Santa Clara, Sunnyvale, Mountain View, Palo Alto)
Charlotte
Raleigh-Durham (Carrboro, Cary, Chapel Hill, Garner, Morrisville,
Portland (Beaverton, Hillsboro, Gresham, Lake Oswego, Tigard)
Nashville (Davidson)
San Antonio
Salt Lake City

The company cautions that there are possible speedbumps in the way and it may not be able to make deals in each of these markets, or in each city and town within those markets.

“We aim to provide updates by the end of the year about which cities will be getting Google Fiber,” writes Google. “Between now and then, we’ll work closely with each city’s leaders on a joint planning process that will not only map out a Google Fiber network in detail, but also assess what unique local challenges we might face.”

Google claims that even those cities with which it is unable to reach an agreement could ultimately benefit from the review process.

“[C]ities who go through this process with us will be more prepared for us or any provider who wants to build a fiber network,” explains the Internet titan.