Secret Phone Numbers And Email Addresses To Reach Executives At 101+ Companies

Inside, email addresses, phone numbers, and addresses for over 100 different companies to inject your customer service complaints into their corporate executive offices, and get it well on the way to success.

Be sure to read our Ultimate Consumerist Guide to Fighting Back, a go-to handbook for the dissatisfied consumer. Once you’ve decided to go the executive customer service right, be sure you read this first so you know what to say when you call the corporate avatar of your choice.

The Consumerist Executive Customer Service Index

ACS
Adelphia
Air Tran
Alamo
Alaska Airlines
Allegiant
Aloha
Amazon
America West
American Airlines
American Express
Amtrak
Apple
ATA
AT&T
AT&T Wireless
Bank of America
Barnes and Noble
Bell Canada
Best Buy
Blizzard
Blockbuster
Blogger
Bloomingdales
Blue Cross/Blue Shield
British Airways
Borders
Busey Bank
Buy.com
Cablevision
Charter Communications
Chase
Circuit City
Citibank
Comcast
Continental
cox
Delta
Direc-TV
Discover Card
Dish
Disney
Ebay
Enterprise
Equifax
Experian
Fedex
Frontier Airlines
Fry’s
Gamefly
Geek Squad
Georgia Power
Helio
Home Depot
Humana
HSBC
IKEA
ING Direct
Insight
Keybank
Lenovo
Loew’s
Macy’s
Microsoft (and Xbox)
Midwest Airlines
Motorola
National City
Nicors
Northwest Airlines
Norton
Office Depot
Office Max
Orbitz
Paypal
Pitney Bowes
Qwest
RCN
Regions Bank
Register.com
Ryan Air
Samsung
Seagate
Sears
Sirius
Skybus
Sony Ericcson
Spirit Airlines
Sprint
Sports Authority
Staples
Symantec
T-mobile
Target
Time Warner Cable
TransUnion
Uhaul
United Airlines
United Health Care
UNUM Life Insurance
UPS
US Airways
US Cellular
Verizon landline/DSL/Fios
Verizon Wireless
Vonage
Wachovia
Walmart
Washington Mutual
Wells Fargo

In the event you can’t find the info you are looking for here, you can scan our backlog of contact info, or use Google to uncover the addresses yourself. In the event you find something we don’t have, feel free to share at tips@consumerist.com.

Researched by Alex Jarvis
Last updated: 11/07/2008

Comments

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  1. Keep talking...I'm listening says:

    Awww….I had one of those little telephones when I was a kid. When you’d pull it with the string it would make all kinds of chattery noises.

    • Dead Wrestlers Society says:

      @caholla: so did I! They were very cool.

      I just wrote a complaint letter to the head of Toyota and a higher up at Bridgestone/Firestone. I went old school and wrote letters.

    • Nighthawke says:

      @caholla:
      I drove my folks nuts with that little chatterbox, yanking it all over the place until the wheels fell off.
      My folks said I chewed them off. Considering my pretensions to gnaw on things as little brat, I was not surprised.

    • aloe vera says:

      @caholla: I, too loved my chatterbox phone. I have the newer version for my daughter, who loves hers just as well!

    • battra92 says:

      @caholla: It’s funny because we had that phone as a case study in test marketing. The first kids to play with it were dragging it around by the receiver since they didn’t quite get the concept of a phone. Because of this the mechanics, noise, wheel and pullstring were added.

      That’s if I’m remembering my marketing class correctly. ^_^;

  2. Random_Name says:

    I’ve had a lot of success reaching Verizon executive customer service. To give you some background, I was unable to pay my Verizon OneBill account online and had spent about 10 hours waiting on hold over about 3 months trying to get the issue resolved.

    I emailed Verizon executive customer service and received a phone call within an hour and a half to confirm that the issue was being worked on. I received an email follow up as soon as the issue was resolved (~3 hours later). I wouldn’t recommend using executive customer service unless regular customer falls through, but it is certainly an effective technique.

  3. in2insight says:

    The T-mobile link returns “nothing”…

  4. tom2133 says:

    @aloe vera: Please tell me it’s still a rotary phone though.

    • magic8ball says:

      @tom2133: It probably is. We bought one for our kids within the past five years, and it is a rotary model – the only rotary phone my kids have ever seen, or probably ever will see. And it still makes the little chattery sound when you pull it, and the ringing bell sound when you “dial.”

  5. Amy Alkon says:

    You guys rock. Thanks yet again.

  6. Rhayader says:

    Whts th vr/ndr n hw mny tms w wll s ths sm bsc pst tdy? 5 r s?

  7. sillyfish says:

    I don’t want to be confrontational, but I’m imagining what it must be like for the executive assistants you would be calling.

    To pick a name a company at random, imagine you are ‘Wendy’, the assistant to the CEO of WaMu. Your boss is desperately trying to prevent the bank’s collapse. You have been working 14 hour days preparing reports and scheduling meetings to help him save the company.

    None of this is your fault. You haven’t seen your kids in weeks. You are tired, and some guy is yelling at you over the phone about a $20 service fee he doesn’t want to pay.

    I am sure these numbers could be really useful as an absolute last resort. But I can’t help feel that they will be used by a lot of angry schmucks with an inflated sense of entitlement.

    $0.02

  8. tararae says:

    unfortunately, the sears info useless. i worked for sears teleserv in alabama. there are two call centers, one in alabama and one in colorado, i believe. the ‘executive customer service’ line routes to the same people who answer the regular ‘national customer relations’ line. if you request executive customer service, you simply get sent to another person at another cubicle in the same room. the customer service rep gets a recording saying “executive executive executive” before the call picks up, telling them to greet the customer differently. as a matter of fact, during training, we were told that when an executive call came in, to make the customer believe you were sitting right outside of alwin lewis or eddie lambert’s office. the rest of our 2-week training was creative ways to tell a customer “no”. there were a few occasions when a customer i had been speaking to requested ‘someone in corporate’, so i transferred them back to the queue, only to answer their call again as an “executive”. in cases such as that, we were instructed to attempt to disguise our voice.

    as for the ‘executive letter’ someone mentioned on the original sears post, those also go to one of the call centers. on slow days, some of us would be pulled away from the phones to answer letters and emails.

    sorry for the long post, but i just had to correct some info for you all.
    and as a side note, my 4 months at sears teleserv was absolutely the worst job of my life!

  9. RedwoodFlyer says:

    Not to be a nitpick…but Skybus doesn’t exactly exist anymore!

  10. BlazerUnit says:

    @caholla: This former youngster growing up in 1980s rural Alabama had one of those too. Come to think of it, I had a lot of Fisher-Price toys: I had a real working FP record player for all of my See, Hear, & Read books. Also there was this play radio that played Hickory-Dickory-Dock, which I’m sure is still in storage somewhere.

  11. joecartoon22 says:

    where is fidelity’s number….

  12. magnoliasouth says:

    I would almost be willing to PAY to get Mediacom’s info. I hate that company and have had nothing but issues with them.