supermarkets

Shihmei Barger 舒詩玫

People Eat In Supermarkets Now, But Please Stop Calling Them ‘Grocerants’

Supermarket delis have expanded in size and broadened their offerings, and there’s apparently a term for this in the food industry. It’s “grocerant.” You know, grocery store + restaurant, where you can combine picking up dinner and doing your shopping. [More]

Great Beyond

Why Are Malls Trying To Fill Empty Spaces With Supermarkets?

To stay viable into the future, malls need to find tenants with businesses that are difficult or impossible to move online. That includes things like parties, doctors’ offices, and a wider variety of restaurants, some of them inside already existing stores. Another business that could fit nicely into a vacant mall anchor slot: a grocery store [More]

Ben Schumin

Walmart Launches Price War With Aldi, Demands Price Cuts From Suppliers

Grocery sales comprise over half of Walmart’s receipts, so it makes sense that the mega-retailer wants to keep its prices competitive. In at least 1,200 of its stores, though, the chain is reportedly slashing prices in an effort to give customers a reason to shop at Walmart instead of discount grocer Aldi and other supermarkets. [More]

Bill Binns

Scientists Reinstalling “Tasty” Genes In Supermarket Tomatoes

Researchers recently confirmed what food storage experts had long believed: Refrigerating tomatoes causes them to lose flavor. Now scientists are hoping that some genetic tinkering will turn blah supermarket tomatoes into flavorful rivals to their farm-fresh cousins. [More]

4 Reasons Amazon Is Willing To Accept Food Stamps For Grocery Delivery

4 Reasons Amazon Is Willing To Accept Food Stamps For Grocery Delivery

This year, some Americans participating in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, aka “Food Stamps”), will be able to pay for groceries online through Amazon, FreshDirect, and some supermarket chains. Given that food delivery services have thus far tended to cater to higher-income consumers, why are these companies — and in particular, Amazon — eager to accept SNAP payments? [More]

Ben Schumin

USDA Asks Meat, Dairy Companies To Replace Confusing Expiration & Sell-By Labels With “Best If Used By” Date

Though almost every food item you buy at the supermarket has some sort of expiration date — under the headers of “Sell By,” “Use By,” “Use Before,” “Best Before,” among others — printed on the packaging, the truth is date labels are largely voluntary and determined by the food producers. If handled properly, most foods are perfectly safe to eat after whatever date is on the label, but stores and consumers throw away an inordinate amount of food every year simply because that date has passed. In an effort to reduce food waste, the federal government is hoping to encourage meat and dairy producers to all use the same phrase: “Best If Used By.” [More]

jayRaz

Even $3 Million Isn’t Enough To Get Supermarkets In Dallas’s Food Deserts

In a desert, there’s not very much water to go around. In a food desert, the problem is groceries: reliable, affordable supermarkets with fresh, healthy, decent-quality offerings get farther apart and harder to find as you head into some regions. One Texas city has been trying to solve the problem for thousands of its residents by ooffering large amounts of cash to supermarket retailers, but even the lure of free millions has resulted in no takers. [More]

Mike Mozart

Head Of Target’s Grocery Business Steps Down Amid Lackluster Results

The Target executive tasked with turning around the retailer’s so-so grocery sales is stepping down after less than two years on the job. [More]

Jeepers Media

Supervalu Selling Off Save-A-Lot Supermarket Chain For $1.4B

Supermarket operator Supervalu will have one fewer chain in its portfolio soon, after announcing that it’s selling off discount grocer Save-A-Lot to a Canadian investment group for $1.37 billion. [More]

Mike Mozart

Beverage Industry Takes Philadelphia To Court Over Soda Tax

A few months back, the city of Philadelphia became just the second city in the U.S. to successfully pass a tax specifically on soft drinks, adding $.015/ounce to the price a distributor pays for sodas — including diet drinks — and other sweetened beverages. As expected, the beverage industry has fired back with a lawsuit challenging this tax, alleging that it illegally duplicates a state tax and diminishes the purchasing power of low-income Philadelphia residents. [More]

MeneerDijk

When It Comes To Food, “Generally Recognized As Safe” May Not Mean What It Sounds Like

Here in the U.S., we have food safety regulations — a lot of them. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is responsible for making sure foods (and a bunch of other stuff) adhere to some basic health and safety rules to reduce the likelihood these products will hit store shelves and make a million people sick. So far, so good… but there’s a major food safety system that the FDA uses that, it turns out, is neither standard nor safe — despite its name.

[More]

Steve

Two Reasons Target Is Having Trouble Selling Groceries

Following the crash of the housing market nearly ten years ago, some big box stores that had previously only dabbled in groceries started to give over more floor space to fresh and frozen foods. Walmart shoppers took to the idea of buying their food in the same store they purchase their TV, cleaning supplies, underwear, sporting goods, and just about anything else. Across the parking lot at Target, things aren’t as rosy. [More]

Grocery Association To Vermont Stores: Keep Labeling GMO Foods, But Only If You Want To

Grocery Association To Vermont Stores: Keep Labeling GMO Foods, But Only If You Want To

On July 1, a new Vermont regulation kicked in, requiring simple text labels on foods — even those prepared or packaged in the stores — made with genetically modified (GMO) ingredients. Then on July 29, President Obama signed into a law a bill that overturns the Vermont rules and will eventually (maybe) create a national standard for GMO labeling, leaving Vermont supermarkets unsure of what they should do about all the stuff they just started labeling. [More]

Would You Scan A QR Code At The Supermarket To Read More About Food?

Would You Scan A QR Code At The Supermarket To Read More About Food?

Last, the president signed into law a fast-tracked piece of legislation that both overturned existing state laws about labeling of food with genetically modified ingredients and established a vague timeline for eventually putting this information on barcodes that customers can scan with their phones. The question is: Will anyone actually do this? [More]

Retronaut

Man Admits To Stripping Naked And Soiling A Self-Checkout Scanner At Kroger

Convenient? Sure. But we will never look at the self-checkout scanner the same way again after an Ohio man admitted to defecating on a UScan-it terminal at a Kroger grocery.

[More]

Senate Approves Bill To Outlaw Vermont GMO Labels, Replace Them With Barcodes

Senate Approves Bill To Outlaw Vermont GMO Labels, Replace Them With Barcodes

Even though some of the nation’s largest food producers — including General Mills, PepsiCo, Campbell Soup, Mars Inc., Bimbo, and Nestle — have already updated their packaging to comply with Vermont’s new labeling requirement for foods containing genetically modified (GMO) ingredients, these tiny lines of text may be short lived. Last night, the U.S. Senate voted to approve legislation that will not only outlaw Vermont’s labeling requirement, but eventually (maybe) replace these text labels with something as obscure as a barcode. [More]

Vermont’s GMO Labeling Law Is Now In Effect. Here Are The Labels The Senate Is Trying To Get Rid Of

Vermont’s GMO Labeling Law Is Now In Effect. Here Are The Labels The Senate Is Trying To Get Rid Of

It’s July 1, 2016, which means that Vermont’s controversial rules for labeling certain products containing genetically modified ingredients (GMOs) is now in effect. With both the supermarket industry and agribusiness-backed Senators trying to defeat this law in court and on Capitol Hill, we took a field trip to Vermont this morning to see just what the labels look like in the real world. [More]

SchuminWeb

Senators Trying To Strike Down Vermont GMO Labeling Law At Last Minute

Two years ago, Vermont became the first state to pass a law requiring clear disclosures of foods containing genetically modified/engineered ingredients. A number of packaged food giants — including PepsiCo, Mars Inc., General Mills, and Campbell Soup Co. — have already made the decision to label their products on a nationwide basis in advance of the July 1 start of the new rules. With that deadline approaching, a pair of agribusiness-backed senators have introduced legislation that would kill the Vermont law, prevent other states from enacting similar regulations, and give companies two years to create a label with little to no information. [More]