News Organizations Sue FBI To Find Out Who & How Much It Paid To Unlock Terrorist’s iPhone

News Organizations Sue FBI To Find Out Who & How Much It Paid To Unlock Terrorist’s iPhone

In the months following the tragic Dec. 2, 2015 terrorist attack in San Bernardino, the FBI and Apple engaged in a heated legal (and publicity) battle over whether or not the tech giant could be compelled to unlock an iPhone belonging to one of the attackers. Then in March 2016, the FBI paid an unidentified third party to provide a solution this particular problem. The identity and actual cost of this unlocking is still unknown, but two of the country’s biggest media companies have sued the FBI to learn more. [More]

frankieleon

JetBlue Passenger Arrested After Allegedly Lighting Blankets On Fire During Flight

When the flight attendants tell a plane full of passengers that smoking is prohibited onboard, perhaps they should clarify that lighting anything on fire is not okay. Some people could probably use a reminder, like the traveler accused of using a lighter to set two blankets aflame during a JetBlue flight. [More]

Nick Bastian

Lawmaker Seeks FBI Files On Financial Crash; Wants To See Why No Bank Execs Were Arrested

Millions of Americans lost their jobs, houses, savings, and more when the housing market collapsed under the weight of mortgages that should never have been approved, let alone bundled and converted into worthless, toxic securities. And yet, no senior Wall Street bank executives were ever charged with a crime. Now one U.S. congressman is asking to look at the FBI files to find out why. [More]

Lexington Herald-Leader

American Airlines Pilot Tackles Passenger Charged With Assaulting Flight Attendant

A Kentucky man is banned from flying on commercial airlines after being arrested on a slew of charges following an altercation with an American Airlines flight attendant that resulted in the man being pinned to the ground by the plane’s pilot. [More]

Paul Thompson

Former St. Louis Cardinals Exec Sentenced To 46 Months For Hacking Houston Astros

More than six months after pleading guilty to hacking into the Houston Astros’ front office computer network, a former St. Louis Cardinals executive has been sentenced to 46 months in federal prison. [More]

Brad Clinesmith

Senator Holds Up Intelligence Authorization Bill Over FBI Digital Surveillance Provisions

Two kinds of bills run the world, or at least the American slice of it: appropriations acts, which give agencies their budgets, and authorization acts, which tell them how to use them and what they are allowed to do. The bill that authorizes all of the United States’ intelligence activities has been making its way through Congress all year, but now has hit a major roadblock in the Senate, as one Senator has taken a stand against some of its surveillance provisions.

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frankieleon

Senate Fails To Approve Bill Allowing FBI Searches Of Web, Phone Records Without Court Order

Earlier this week, in response to the recent massacre of 49 people at Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Senators John McCain of Arizona and Richard Burr of North Carolina introduced a controversial piece of legislation that, if approved, would allow federal law enforcement to perform searches of suspects’ electronic and online records without a traditional court order. However, this morning the Senate narrowly failed to approve the bill. [More]

Vileinist

FBI Wants Computers To Scan Your Tattoos To Learn All About You

Law enforcement has long used tattoos as a way to identify people (“The suspect has the name ‘Marge’ on his forearm”), or as an indicator of group membership (“All members of the gang had the same exact tattoo on their forearms”), but the FBI’s in-development tattoo recognition program seeks to create an algorithm to make instant inferences about a person’s behavior based on their tattoos.
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photographybynatalia

Bill Requiring Security Backdoors On Phones & Other Devices Appears To Be DOA

Last month, Senators Diane Feinstein of California and Richard Burr of North Carolina were set to bring forth legislation that would end the debate on whether companies like Apple should help law enforcement unlock users’ devices, by requiring them to do so. In spite of the bipartisan, high-level sponsorship and the spotlight of the disputes between Apple and the Justice Department, it looks like this controversial legislation may never even be formally introduced. [More]

ken fager

Defendant: Geek Squad Employee Was Paid FBI Informant, Searched Devices Illegally

A doctor in California claims that there are real secret agents in the Geek Squad, and that a paid FBI informant turned him in after finding suspicious material on his hard drive in 2012. While the FBI doesn’t deny that the Geek Squad employee did contact them about the contents of the defendant’s hard drive and that they did pay him, the Bureau insists that it didn’t employ informants working in the Geek Squad repair center to comb users’ computers for porn. [More]

Patrick

FBI Lends FAA Drone Detector For Tests At Kennedy Airport

Birds pose a danger to commercial aircraft, but unauthorized drones are also a threat. Fortunately for everyone, we don’t yet know what would happen if a solid unmanned aerial vehicle collided with a jet or flew into its engine. The Federal Aviation Administration doesn’t want to find out, which is one of the reasons why they tested an FBI drone-detection system to prevent crashes. [More]

Tom Raftery

Court Rejects Twitter’s Transparency Lawsuit Against Justice Dept.

Twitter has hit a substantial roadblock in its nearly two-year legal battle against restrictions on what it can reveal to users about requests for data from federal law enforcement agencies. Yesterday, a U.S. District Court dismissed a substantial chunk of Twitter’s case, though the social media platform will be given an opportunity to try again. [More]

photographybynatalia

Secretive U.S. Spy Court Approved All 1,457 Surveillance Requests In 2015

The federal court set up to review government requests for surveillance involving issues of national security is either rubber-stamping everything that it sees, or the FBI and the National Security Agency are incredibly good at filing these requests. A new report claims that the court approved every single one of the 1,457 requests it received last year. [More]

Vincent Lee

Why Won’t The FBI Tell Apple How It Unlocked iPhone?

A month ago, the FBI dropped its legal effort to compel Apple to unlock a dead terrorist’s iPhone after a third party provided the agency with a way to bypass the device’s encryption. While the federal law enforcer is okay with using what it learned to aid other criminal investigations, it doesn’t look like the FBI is jumping at the chance to let Apple in on the secret. [More]

William Hook

The End Is Just The Beginning In The Apple Vs. DOJ Legal Battle Over Encryption

As you may have heard, on Friday afternoon the U.S. Department of Justice backed off its efforts to compel Apple to aid in unlocking a criminal suspect’s iPhone — for the second time in only a few weeks. While some have heralded this as a significant victory for Apple (or at least as a loss for the government), it’s really just a tiny, unresolved spat in what looks to become a protracted legal battle for both sides. [More]

Prime Number

Apple: Why Should We Help Unlock iPhone Of Someone Who Has Already Pled Guilty?

With the U.S. Department of Justice still attempting to compel Apple to unlock the iPhone of a drug suspect, the tech giant is asking the court why this is so important when the former owner of that iPhone has already pled guilty. [More]

(713 Avenue)

Petition Against Encryption-Weakening Bill Crosses 40,000 Signatures In Two Days

Usually, D.C. moves slowly. There’s a kind of plodding, methodical rhythm to Congress and the federal agencies, and very little turns on a dime. So it stands out that less than 48 hours after introducing a bill into the Senate, over 42,000 people have already objected to basically everything about it.

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photographybynatalia

4 Things You Need To Know About New Bill Requiring Weak Encryption On Devices

A week after it was first reported that Senators Dianne Feinstein (CA) and Richard Burr (NC) were prepping a bipartisan bill that would compel tech companies to build their devices and software with weakened encryption or built-in backdoors for law enforcement, the actual bill has been introduced. Here’s what you need to know about why consumer and privacy advocates are concerned.
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