Maulleigh

There’s More Money Loaded On Starbucks Cards Than Customer Deposits At Several Banks

While we’re used to the idea of people keeping money in places other than bank accounts — preloaded debit cards, sock drawers, comic book collections — there’s one way consumers are storing their cash that’s more popular than several financial institutions: Starbucks cards. [More]

Ludovic Bertron

$5M Credit Card Skimming Scheme Nets Man Seven Years In Jail

A high-ranking member of the largest card-skimming operation in the U.S. will spend the next seven years in prison for his part in a scheme that used ATMs at several national banks to steal $5 million from credit card accounts.

[More]

frankieleon)

Card Reissued Because Of A Breach? Good Luck Finding Out Where The Hack Happened

When a massive data breach happens at a retailer like Target or Home Depot, there’s little mystery as to why your bank is rushing you a new credit or debit card. But when your card is being replaced because of a lower-profile cybercrime, the odds are against you ever finding out why.  [More]

https://www.flickr.com/photos/jeepersmedia/14615153816

Wells Fargo Corporate Banking Clients Can Soon Stare Deeply Into Their App To Sign In

Until we get to a Minority Report-like future, we’re all carrying around some unique forms of identification that even the most talented identity thieves can’t steal: our bodies. In an effort to beef up security by taking advantage of customers’ unique phyiscal attributes, Wells Fargo will offer some clients the option of signing into their mobile app accounts with eye scan verification, or face and voice recognition. [More]

Banks Turned Account Overdraft Fees Into $11.16B In Revenue Last Year

Banks Turned Account Overdraft Fees Into $11.16B In Revenue Last Year

Banks with more than $1 billion in assets now need to report on how much revenue they bring in from overdraft fees and other charges. The first report on those numbers shows that banks made $11.6 billion last year from customers who overdrew their accounts.
[More]

CFPB To Banks: Offer More “No Overdraft” Checking Accounts, Provide Accurate Credit Information

CFPB To Banks: Offer More “No Overdraft” Checking Accounts, Provide Accurate Credit Information

Some 10 million Americans are considered “unbanked,” often because they are believed to pose too high a credit risk for a bank to offer them a standard checking account. But the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau believes many of these people could be brought into the fold if more banks were to offer lower-risk deposit accounts that provided the benefits of a checking account without being a risk to the financial institution. [More]

Bank Of America Following Chase’s Lead, Joining Card-Free ATM Party

Bank Of America Following Chase’s Lead, Joining Card-Free ATM Party

Just days after Chase announced it would install cardess ATMs offering a variety of denominations, Bank of America says it will also jump on the card-free bandwagon.  [More]

This is just a regular Chase ATM, not a new one. (TheTruthAbout)

Chase To Install Cardless ATMs That Offer A Variety Of Denominations

Bank customers weary of using ATMs for fear they’ve been compromised by ne’er-do-wells using skimmers to get their hands on card numbers have a new option. That is, if they bank with JPMorgan Chase, as the company is rolling out new cash machines that are not only cardless, but will let you take out money in a wider variety of denominations.  [More]

The 3 Biggest Banks Extracted $6 Billion In ATM And Overdraft Fees From Us Last Year

The 3 Biggest Banks Extracted $6 Billion In ATM And Overdraft Fees From Us Last Year

Back in 1998, comedian Al Franken published a satirical novel where the fictional Al Franken ran a single-issue presidential campaign against ATM fees in 2000. A technical malfunction erased ATM deposits, making his single issue a crucial one, and Franken ended up in the White House. Today, he is a sitting U.S. senator, yet not involved in the 2016 presidential race where excessively high ATM fees are an actual issue being discussed. [More]

Banks Urge Congress To Continue Renewing Their “Get Out Of Jail Free” Cards

Banks Urge Congress To Continue Renewing Their “Get Out Of Jail Free” Cards

Nestled deep in the text of the lengthy contracts for most credit cards and bank accounts are little clauses that not only prohibit harmed customers from suing their bank or card issuer, but also prevents them from banding together with similarly injured consumers to argue their dispute as a group. In October, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau announced it would consider limits on these clauses, but now the banking industry is trying to use its leverage with D.C. lawmakers to shut down that process. [More]

Target Agrees To Pay Banks $39.4M For Expenses Resulting From 2013 Data Breach

Target Agrees To Pay Banks $39.4M For Expenses Resulting From 2013 Data Breach

Target continues to put the disastrous 2013 holiday-season data breach behind it, agreeing today to pay $39.4 million to banks claiming they lost money during the hack.  [More]

(Mike Mozart)

Wells Fargo’s High-Pressure Sales Strategy Probed By Federal Regulators

Six months after the Los Angeles City Attorney filed a lawsuit accusing Wells Fargo of a slew of unfair practices — like encouraging employees to open unauthorized consumer accounts and then charging those accounts phony fees to meet sales expectations — two other regulatory agencies have opened investigations into the bank’s behavior.  [More]

Flyinace2000

Banks Ditching Online Security Images Some Experts Call “Worse Than Useless”

When you log into your bank account online, you might see an image of a birdhouse, or a teapot, or some other object you selected when you signed up. Those pictures are supposed to help keep a customer’s account safe, by assuring them that the web page they’re viewing is, in fact, the bank’s website and not a scammy fake. But as cybercriminals are catching on, banks are choosing to ditch the images in favor of other security measures. [More]

(Emily)

Xerox’s Federal Student Loan Servicing Under Investigation Over Inaccuracies, Overcharges

When you think of Xerox, photos of large, office printers is likely the first thing to come to mind. But it turns out the company also dabbles in the education business. And it’s that venture that federal investigators are probing after discovering nearly a decade of errors.  [More]

CFPB To Consider Rules That Would Revoke Banks’ “License To Steal”

Van Swearingen

The lengthy, often complicated terms of use for more than half of all credit cards — and nearly half of all federally insured bank deposits — include clauses that force customers into arbitration, taking away their right to sue these companies in a court of law and usually blocking them from joining together in a class action. Critics argue that these forced-arbitration clauses allow banks and other businesses to break the law with impunity. Heeding the call of lawmakers and consumer advocates, the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has decided to consider rules that would ban this practice among financial institutions. [More]

(Mike Mozart)

Only A Few Banks Are Making Their Credit Card Customers Memorize PINs

One compromise that financial institutions have made in the national shift to EMV smart cards from magnetic-stripe cards is that Americans will sign for their purchases instead of entering a 4-digit PIN. Maybe banks think that we’re stupider than the rest of the world, since other countries do use PINs. [More]

The Chip-And-PIN Credit Card Era Starts Today. What You Need To Know

The Chip-And-PIN Credit Card Era Starts Today. What You Need To Know

Over the past few months, you may have noticed more retailers adorning their checkout stands with shiny new credit card readers. While those systems still have an area along the side where you swipe your card’s magnetic strip, they also have a smaller slot (typically) on the front where you simply jam gently insert your card. This is all part of the country’s shift toward more secure, but far from perfect, chip-enabled cards that kicks into high-gear today. [More]

Sorry, You Can’t Pay The IRS With A Check For $100 Million Anymore

Sorry, You Can’t Pay The IRS With A Check For $100 Million Anymore

You there! The one ready to write a big, fat check to the Internal Revenue Service — drop that pen. The agency has announced that it will no longer accept checks for $100 million, so you’ll just have to write more than one check. So yeah, you can go ahead and pick that pen up again now. [More]