Well, At Least Advertisers Like The Nudity-Free Version Of Playboy Better

The cover of a braille edition of Playboy. (Photo: Adam Fagen)

The cover of a braille edition of Playboy. (Photo: Adam Fagen)

A few months ago, Playboy magazine announced that it would be acknowledging that the Internet is a thing and getting rid of full-frontal nude pictures, going for more PG-rated content, wider availability in stores, and some nice free publicity. Is it working? The magazine’s most important customers are pleased with the change: advertisers.

The magazine’s March issue will be the first one where models keep their clothes on, and that means two things. First, the issue might have collectible value for some people, though we’d argue that the last issue with nudity has more cultural value.

Second, it means that advertisers get to see what the new version of the magazine, which people may honestly be able to say that they read for the articles, looks like. Some big ad campaigns signed on for the first issue, though, including Stoli vodka with an appropriate ad tagline of “Here’s to leaving just a little to the imagination.”

Apparently, no Detroit automakers had advertised in Playboy since the ’80s, and that changed with the March issue and an ad from Dodge. That’s an important step for the brand, CEO Scott Flanders told Advertising Age. “To me, on its face, it says that we are acceptable to mainstream consumer products brands.”

The No-Nudity Playboy Is Doing Well With Advertisers, So Far [AdAge]