Verizon Redefines "Materially Adverse" To Prevent Customer Cancellations

Marie needs help getting her Verizon contract canceled without termination fee. The supervisor she wrangled with decided that he’s going to reinvent standing contract law…

Read her story and how she can fight back, inside…


I just had to say that those people at Verizon Wireless are relentless. After an hour on the phone even following the script I was not able to get out of the contract because of the price hike. The supervisor kept saying….”come on Marie…this not going to affect you at all.” He basically said that is was not enough of a price change to qualify as a “Material Adverse Effect.” But of course he could not tell a dollar amount that would be considered. I guarantee if I was short on my bill even $5 and just never paid that they would send me to collections. It just blows my mind that they can notify you of changes and tell you to look at your agreement but then not honor that agreement themselves. I almost want to cancel and pay the fee just so they do not get my business anymore. I did send in a complaint to the BBB and FCC. I realize it is a lost cause. Thanks for all the great articles. I love them. – Marie

Marie! It’s not a lost cause! Any materially adverse effect is a materially adverse effect, whether it’s $5 or $500. It’s an on/off switch. Either something is materially adverse, or it isn’t

We suggest calling back and trying again. Stick to your guns. Eat away their clock. Inform them that it’s a breach of standard contract law to not let you leave.

Repeat this:

“If it is not a materially adverse effect, you would not have been legally obligated to send me a legal notice. Since I recieved one, this qualifies. cancel the account.”

P.S. You can add the Public Utilities Commission as another place to file a complaint with. — BEN POPKEN

RELATED: Script For Escaping Verizon Contracts Without Fee, Based On Text Message Rate Raises
(Photo: Sam Wilkinson)