Viking Customer Still Hot Over Knobs

The guy who complained about his Viking knobs wrote in again. His letter, inside.

Hyman writes:

    “Dear Ben,

    Thank-you for your suggestion to call Viking corporate. I did that and spoke to a supervisor who said she will speak to the engineers at Viking and get back to me. I suggested she check consumerist for more details. That perked up her ears. I offered Ingen Angiven’s brilliant suggestion of a set of replacement knobs that stick out a little further or alternatively of a metal rod that slips over the existing axle thereby extending the original knob further out.

    You said that you “can read the oven knobs just fine” The oven knobs are the second ones in from either end. The other four knobs are the stove top knobs and they are not problematic.

    Stepping back is not an option, as I would have to step back too far to handle the dial.

    I agree with the commenters who imply that I must be stupid for not spotting the problem in the showroom. They are right, except that the appliance was bought by name reputation, assuming (never assume) that a company as high end as Viking would have QA to pick up obvious defects.

    Incidentally, recent model Viking ranges do not have the problem. Obviously Viking was made aware (not by me) of the defect and corrected it.

    What is Dremel?

    I am, and you must be too, pleased by the lively discussion generated.


We’re glad Hyman stepped up and called Viking instead of just being discouraged by their email response. If one avenue of customer service approach doesn’t work, it helps to try another.

A Dremel is a hand-sized rotary tool. Among its many uses, you can cut through metal with it.

Regarding the workaround…. step back, lock the position of the dial in your mind, then approach and turn the dial to where you think it goes. Step back and check. Adjust, repeat as many times as necessary.

Try before you buy. Just because a product is name brand doesn’t mean you don’t need to think critically about your purchase. — BEN POPKEN