Why It Might Make Sense To Insure Your Garden

Money may not grow on trees, but it can take a lot of green to make a garden look good. Vegetation in and around your home may be an afterthought when it comes to insuring your home, but your policy should match the level of care, work and funds you put in to your greenery.

Totally Money explains why it’s smart for some to talk to your insurance agent about covering your plants. A number of threats, ranging from natural to man-made, could harm your garden and landscaping. If you take a survey of what it would cost to replace your plants, you could be shocked at the figure. If it ever comes time to file a claim, it will help to have kept a running inventory of your plants’ value, documented with pictures.

Noting that thieves may target relatively easy-to-swipe potted plants, the writer recommends protecting your investments by sheltering them at night or when you’re away from home.

Protect your home inside – and out [Totally Money]

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  1. Blueskylaw says:

    “Why It Might Make Sense To Insure Your Garden”
    When you have to deal with Homeowners Associations.

    http://consumerist.com/2012/03/condo-association-puts-lien-on-womans-townhouse-over-tiny-flower-garden.html

  2. catastrophegirl chooses not to fly says:

    that actually makes sense if you’ve had a lot of expensive landscaping done that could be replaced after a bad storm or something. i wouldn’t even meet my deductible if something happened to the few plants i’ve put in my yard. but now i’m wondering whether trees could be insured. not that they could be restored to their current immense and very mature state but if my magnolia got taken down in a tornado, i’d want to put another one there.

  3. A Feral Ginger says:

    While my tiny “garden” gets eaten, I have a friend who has spent years and a small fortune cultivating myriad rare and exotic rosebushes. I suspect that if you took into consideration the time she put in and the experts she hired for consultation, the garden would be more valuable than the house.

    I’ve never even considered insuring a garden, but then again I’ve never been a homeowner yet. In my friend’s case it would be insanity not to insure hers.

  4. jrwn says:

    Trees, I can see. Plants in pots, that costs, what, $20-40 dollars? That’s not even worth the claim, nor the increase in your monthly payments.

  5. trencherman says:

    Two of my neighbors have had plants stolen, not in pots, but right out of the ground. Some plants are quite expensive, especially the fancier cactus, where I live.

    I hadn’t thought of insuring plants before. One of my neighbors has lost two 90′+ Post Oaks, that really aren’t replaceable (in her lifetime). I’m sure she would have appreciated some remuneration.

  6. scoosdad says:

    You need to insure your garden when the cable company shows up and decides not to follow the predetermined pathway for a new cable and runs the trenching machine right through the middle of the garden, instead of taking a less destructive and just slightly longer route:

    http://youtu.be/s0ICCRwTk8U

    And dammit, you just missed your chance to vote for these guys in Round 2. But rest assured, I did.

  7. DrPizza says:

    I’m going to get an insurance policy to protect $900 worth of plants. The deductible on the policy is $1000. Why is my insurance agent grinning?

  8. Kate says:

    I’ve never heard of an insurance company that would insure plants. Every insurance policy I’ve ever seen specifically excluded them, no matter how expensive.

  9. infinitemonkeys says:

    You can very easily insure your garden by buying plants from The Home Depot. Their plants have a 1-year guarantee. Though this does not actually apply to annuals and tender perennials, in practice, most HD stores will refund for almost any dead plant that does not have signs of axe notches or beaver teeth. Keep in mind the stores can only look up your purchase on a card (credit/debit) for 3-months, so if you want to take maximum advantage, I recommend to purchasers that they take the receipt and put it in a zip-lock bag and tuck it in the side of the pot or in the ground when they plant their purchase. If the plant dies, rip it out, grab the bagged receipt in mint condition and head to the store to get a new one.

    Of course, this will probably not help if you have a fire or plants are completely destroyed and unrecognizable, but it covers many lost plants.

  10. infinitemonkeys says:

    You can very easily insure your garden by buying plants from The Home Depot. Their plants have a 1-year guarantee. Though this does not actually apply to annuals and tender perennials, in practice, most HD stores will refund for almost any dead plant that does not have signs of axe notches or beaver teeth. Keep in mind the stores can only look up your purchase on a card (credit/debit) for 3-months, so if you want to take maximum advantage, I recommend to purchasers that they take the receipt and put it in a zip-lock bag and tuck it in the side of the pot or in the ground when they plant their purchase. If the plant dies, rip it out, grab the bagged receipt in mint condition and head to the store to get a new one.

    Of course, this will probably not help if you have a fire or plants are completely destroyed and unrecognizable, but it covers many lost plants.

  11. gman863 says:

    I see far too many loopholes (on the insurance company’s side) on this paying off.

    Based on having filed three hurricane claims (two in Alabama and one in Texas) over the past 15 years…

    * If you have a 2% – 5% windstorm/hail deductible (now common within 100 miles of the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts), the 2% is based on the total insured replacement value of your house. As an example, if your home has a $200,000 “replacement cost” listed on the policy, you have a $4,000 deductible at 2%, $10,000 at 5%. Unless you have other significant damage to the property, you won’t get a dime.

    * Even if you have “full replacement value” coverage, read your policy carefully. Certain “landscaping” items such as fences are not covered at full replacement; rather they are covered as depreciating assets. This is why I got only $1500 towards the $4000 replacement cost of my fence after Hurricane Ike (not to mention the 2%/$3500 deductible on my roof).

  12. icerabbit says:

    We do more gardening and landscaping than probably 75% of Americans. It would have never occurred to me to seek landscaping / garden insurance unless you maybe live in a fire prone area and have an extensive garden fit for a publication.

    Unless said policy would cover any and every destructive cause, I do not think it is worth the premium and hassle, because, anything that damages your garden is going to be an act of god, act of nature or some other exclusion.

    We learned our lesson with the only claim we ever made, after a hurricane damaged our house (Florida 2004). Standard State Farm coverage, written up by the local agency including various coverages for wind storm, etc.

    Front door damage. Never covered according to adjuster.
    Glazed entrance room. Not covered as it was not a conditioned space.
    Water damage due to roofing material that blew off. Not covered … it was “surface water” ???

    I could not believe my ears. It was a real eye opener and brain-scratcher in many regards. Of course with that being the third hurricane of the year, one couldn’t reach anyone at State Farm, …

    So, anyway, if your front door isn’t even covered on your homeowners policy … what exclusions are they going to have about insuring your garden???

    I’d put that premium money away for a little emergency garden fund, if you are really worried about it.

    And, chances are if something that destructive is going to happen to your garden that you’d need insurance; you’ll have bigger property damage to your house to worry about first – hurricane, tornado, wild fire, …