5 Mortal Sins Of Email Use

Email is magical for its amazing ability to get people to despise you through its misuse. It’s rare that those who are offended by inappropriate emails call the abuser out on their foibles, so offenders often continue unchecked. But this has to stop. People need to slap some virtual hands to correct bad behavior.

Young Entrepreneur leads the assault by identifying email errors to avoid:

* Forward chain letters. There was a brief period in 1996 when this was halfway allowable, but those were the caveman days. There’s no longer room for such shenanigans.

* Act like you’re texting. Emails are more formal and professional than text messages, so avoid the gratuitous emoticons and pathetic spelling and grammar

* Using a company email for private messages. You’ve got a personal account, so use it for your personal needs and don’t soil your company records with correspondence that could get you in trouble.

* BCC bombing. Use the blind carbon copy function to protect your recipients, not exploit them. Its use makes sense when you’re sending out a mass email but don’t want to share everyone’s address with one another. Don’t use it to secretively let others eavesdrop on your conversation.

* Get hooked by phishers. Clicking on spammy messages is an invitation to let your account be hacked, sending out unwanted messages to those in your address book. When you discover your account has been exploited, change your password and send out an apology message to let recipients know you’ve taken care of the problem.

12 Golden Rules Of Email Etiquette [Young Entrepreneur]

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  1. Karney says:

    “Act like you’re texting. Emails are more formal and professional than text messages, so avoid the gratuitous emoticons and pathetic spelling and grammar”

    This also applies to comment sections, facebook, and anywhere else where using short-form ‘text speech’ makes you look unintelligent.

    • Blueskylaw says:

      i totly agre with u lol ;-)

    • caradrake says:

      I don’t mind emoticons in email. With ‘tone’ being hard to decipher in text, it’s good to see a “;)” after something that could either be an insult or a joke. But this refers to personal emails. In a more professional email, I agree that they are improper.

      Net-speak is never okay.

    • TBGBoodler says:

      I agree!

      When I ran a website for one organization, we did an annual online survey of our members. The long-form comments that were written with no punctuation or with poor grammar were actually disregarded by management. When it looks like an idiot is talking, folks will listen like an idiot is talking.

    • BadIdeaSociety says:

      We have been living with an Internet that has had plenty of storage space since the early 90s. There hasn’t been a valid excuse to abbreviate correspondence (SMSes included) for years.

    • alana0j says:

      I even see this in my online college classes. We have discussion forums to do that correspond with the chapters we’re covering…and some of the comments I read sound like they are from the mouth of a twelve year old. I really don’t think college is meant for everybody…

    • Round-Eye §ñ‰∫∫„ÅØ„Ç≥„É≥„Çπ„Éû„É™„ÉÉ„Çπ„Éà„ÅåÂ•Ω„Åç„Åß„Åô„ÄÇ says:

      Even in text messages/SMSs, text-speak makes its user look unintelligent. Even worse is when terms like “LOL” are actually said, as in ell-oh-ell.

    • thiazzi says:

      I get this at work a lot, and it makes me want to ragequit my career:

      “the ads are wrong size on the wrong pages???”

      What ads? What pages? What size SHOULD they be? Are you asking or telling me? FUCK YOU, arghhh! This is usually from people waaay up the ladder, too.

  2. tbax929 says:

    I don’t like text speak even in my text messages; I sure as hell don’t like it in my e-mails. Sadly, I’m seeing more and more of this. I get e-mails from so-called professionals that look like they’re sent from my 16-year-old niece.

    • littlebigland says:

      I hate text speak in text messages too. There was an excuse when one had to tap out messages on a keypad, but with the advent of keyboards on phones and/or auto correct, there is no excuse.

    • SilentAgenger says:

      I agree, but wonder if an exception should be allowed for those who use a blackberry or similar device to compose their email. I’ve received advance apologies from such users, who explain up front that the tiny buttons do not make it easy for them to write a lengthy and professional-looking email.

    • Debbie says:

      Then you are probably old enough to have learned cursive handwriting, like me.

  3. TalKeaton: Every Puzzle Has an Answer! says:

    Personally, I’d add “Use Reply All when you only wanted to reply to one person” to the list. I’d guess it’s one of the twelve in the source link, but I can’t get it to load.

    • K-Bo says:

      I’m convinced some people I work with don’t even know reply exists. They refuse to use it, they just default to reply all every single time.

    • tbax929 says:

      I can’t get it to load either. If it’s not on the list it should be. I can’t tell you how many times I get stuck in this loop of unwanted e-mails because no one can figure out they don’t need to reply to the ENTIRE group. Ugh.

    • JJEagleHawk says:

      That’s #2 on the original article, though obviously you’d have no way to know that if you’re having loading problems . . .

      “2. Respond to group emails appropriately

      This is usually a novice mistake. There is a difference between the ‚Äúreply‚Äù button and the ‚Äúreply all‚Äù button when responding to an email. If you‚Äôre part of a group message which one you choose can make a huge difference. Be very careful when responding to group messages as your response will be sent to everyone else in that group, this has been known to get people in some serious trouble.”

  4. Torgonius wants an edit button says:

    “Store the stuff you want to keep in your ‘Deleted Items’ folder.”

    • CajunGuy says:

      Holy cow. You’ve seen this, too? I worked IT helpdesk at a casino for a while, and it seemed like every other moron there stored their important emails in Deleted Items. Why in the blue Hell would someone ever think that’s a good place to store ANYTHING?

      It became a real issue when we changed account policies where every time you exit Outlook it would empty Deleted Items. We had to do it because no one would ever clean up their accounts and our Exchange server was constantly out of HDD space. The feces hit the oscillating air mover the day we implemented that and suddenly half the office personnel’s “important” emails disappeared.

  5. Cat says:

    *Forward chain letters: There was never a period when this was acceptable. If you can’t write me PERSONALLY, don’t write me.

    Worse yet, you are forwarding the email address of everyone that ever got the chain email to everyone who will ever get it.

    NEVER. Forward. Chain. Mail. EVER.

    • bhr says:

      I remember, in college (1995 or 1996) someone went off on chain letters by CCing every email address on the chain and just going nuts. Was the funniest, saddest email I have received to this day, and of course led to a series of reply:all responses among the targets.

  6. humphrmi says:

    I agree!

    >Email is magical for its amazing ability to get people to despise you through its misuse. It’s rare
    >that those who are offended by inappropriate emails call the abuser out on their foibles, so
    >offenders often continue unchecked. But this has to stop. People need to slap some virtual
    >hands to correct bad behavior.
    >
    >Young Entrepreneur leads the assault by identifying email errors to avoid:
    >
    >* Forward chain letters. There was a brief period in 1996 when this was halfway allowable, but
    >those were the caveman days. There’s no longer room for such shenanigans.
    >
    >
    >* Act like you’re texting. Emails are more formal and professional than text messages, so avoid
    >the gratuitous emoticons and pathetic spelling and grammar
    >
    >
    >* Using a company email for private messages. You’ve got a personal account, so use it for your
    >personal needs and don’t soil your company records with correspondence that could get you in
    >trouble.
    >
    >* BCC bombing. Use the blind carbon copy function to protect your recipients, not exploit them.
    >Its use makes sense when you’re sending out a mass email but don’t want to share everyone’s
    >address with one another. Don’t use it to secretively let others eavesdrop on your conversation.
    >
    >* Get hooked by phishers. Clicking on spammy messages is an invitation to let your account be
    >hacked, sending out unwanted messages to those in your address book. When you discover
    >your account has been exploited, change your password and send out an apology message to
    >let recipients know you’ve taken care of the problem.
    >

    • kelcema says:

      Stop emailing me!!

    • Nuc says:

      I see what you did there…

    • IphtashuFitz says:

      >I agree!
      >
      >>Email is magical for its amazing ability to get people to despise you through its misuse. It’s rare
      >>that those who are offended by inappropriate emails call the abuser out on their foibles, so
      >>offenders often continue unchecked. But this has to stop. People need to slap some virtual
      >>hands to correct bad behavior.
      >>
      >>Young Entrepreneur leads the assault by identifying email errors to avoid:
      >>
      >>* Forward chain letters. There was a brief period in 1996 when this was halfway allowable, but
      >>those were the caveman days. There’s no longer room for such shenanigans.
      >>
      >>
      >>* Act like you’re texting. Emails are more formal and professional than text messages, so avoid
      >>the gratuitous emoticons and pathetic spelling and grammar
      >>
      >>
      >>* Using a company email for private messages. You’ve got a personal account, so use it for your
      >>personal needs and don’t soil your company records with correspondence that could get you in
      >>trouble.
      >>
      >>* BCC bombing. Use the blind carbon copy function to protect your recipients, not exploit them.
      >>Its use makes sense when you’re sending out a mass email but don’t want to share everyone’s
      >>address with one another. Don’t use it to secretively let others eavesdrop on your conversation.
      >>
      >>* Get hooked by phishers. Clicking on spammy messages is an invitation to let your account be
      >>hacked, sending out unwanted messages to those in your address book. When you discover
      >>your account has been exploited, change your password and send out an apology message to
      >>let recipients know you’ve taken care of the problem.
      >>

      So do I!

      • El_Fez says:

        >>>I agree!
        >>>
        >>Email is magical for its amazing ability to get people to despise you through its misuse. It’s rare
        >>>that those who are offended by inappropriate emails call the abuser out on their foibles, so
        >>>offenders often continue unchecked. But this has to stop. People need to slap some virtual
        >>>hands to correct bad behavior.
        >>>
        >>>Young Entrepreneur leads the assault by identifying email errors to avoid:
        >>>
        >>>* Forward chain letters. There was a brief period in 1996 when this was halfway allowable, >but
        >>>those were the caveman days. There’s no longer room for such shenanigans.
        >>>
        >>>
        >>>* Act like you’re texting. Emails are more formal and professional than text messages, so >avoid
        >>>the gratuitous emoticons and pathetic spelling and grammar
        >>>
        >>>
        >>>* Using a company email for private messages. You’ve got a personal account, so use it >for your
        >>>personal needs and don’t soil your company records with correspondence that could get >you in
        >>>trouble.
        >>>
        >>>* BCC bombing. Use the blind carbon copy function to protect your recipients, not exploit >them.
        >>>Its use makes sense when you’re sending out a mass email but don’t want to share >everyone’s
        >>>address with one another. Don’t use it to secretively let others eavesdrop on your >conversation.
        >>>
        >>>* Get hooked by phishers. Clicking on spammy messages is an invitation to let your >account be
        >>>hacked, sending out unwanted messages to those in your address book. When you >discover
        >>>your account has been exploited, change your password and send out an apology >message to
        >>>let recipients know you’ve taken care of the problem.
        >>>
        >
        >So do I!

        TAKE ME OFF THIS LIST!!!!

        • kenj0418 says:

          >>>>I agree!
          >>>>
          >>>Email is magical for its amazing ability to get people to despise you through its misuse. It’s rare
          >>>>that those who are offended by inappropriate emails call the abuser out on their foibles, so
          >>>>offenders often continue unchecked. But this has to stop. People need to slap some virtual
          >>>>hands to correct bad behavior.
          >>>>
          >>>>Young Entrepreneur leads the assault by identifying email errors to avoid:
          >>>>
          >>>>* Forward chain letters. There was a brief period in 1996 when this was halfway allowable, >but
          >>>>those were the caveman days. There’s no longer room for such shenanigans.
          >>>>
          >>>>
          >>>>* Act like you’re texting. Emails are more formal and professional than text messages, so >avoid
          >>>>the gratuitous emoticons and pathetic spelling and grammar
          >>>>
          >>>>
          >>>>* Using a company email for private messages. You’ve got a personal account, so use it >for your
          >>>>personal needs and don’t soil your company records with correspondence that could get >you in
          >>>>trouble.
          >>>>
          >>>>* BCC bombing. Use the blind carbon copy function to protect your recipients, not exploit >them.
          >>>>Its use makes sense when you’re sending out a mass email but don’t want to share >everyone’s
          >>>>address with one another. Don’t use it to secretively let others eavesdrop on your >conversation.
          >>>>
          >>>>* Get hooked by phishers. Clicking on spammy messages is an invitation to let your >account be
          >>>>hacked, sending out unwanted messages to those in your address book. When you >discover
          >>>>your account has been exploited, change your password and send out an apology >message to
          >>>>let recipients know you’ve taken care of the problem.
          >>>>
          >>
          >>So do I!
          >
          >TAKE ME OFF THIS LIST!!!!

          Me too.

          This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended solely for the use of the
          individual or entity to whom they are addressed. If you have received this email in error please
          notify the system manager. This message contains confidential information and is intended only for
          the individual named. If you are not the named addressee you should not disseminate, distribute or
          copy this e-mail. Please notify the sender immediately by e-mail if you have received this e-mail by
          mistake and delete this e-mail from your system. If you are not the intended recipient you are
          notified that disclosing, copying, distributing or taking any action in reliance on the contents of
          this information is strictly prohibited.

          WARNING: Computer viruses can be transmitted via email. The recipient should check this email and
          any attachments for the presence of viruses. The company accepts no liability for any damage caused
          by any virus transmitted by this email. E-mail transmission cannot be guaranteed to be secure or
          error-free as information could be intercepted, corrupted, lost, destroyed, arrive late or
          incomplete, or contain viruses. The sender therefore does not accept liability for any errors or
          omissions in the contents of this message, which arise as a result of e-mail transmission.

          Warning: Although the company has taken reasonable precautions to ensure no viruses are present in
          this email, the company cannot accept responsibility for any loss or damage arising from the use of
          this email or attachments.

        • haggis for the soul says:

          Replying to all to say STOP REPLYING TO ALL!

  7. Hi_Hello says:

    I dunno… who created these etiquette? I figure the person who created the email should make the call…

    from my understand.. email was design to be short and simple.

    • pecan 3.14159265 says:

      Etiquette exists for a reason. If people were just allowed to judge for themselves without having some kind of base etiquette, it’d be acceptable to chew with your mouth open, walk in without knocking, and no one would hold the door open for anyone else.

  8. maxamus2 says:

    You forgot the unnecessarily long “signatures” at the bottom. I don’t need to see cutesy pictures of your animals or kids and some saying from the bible and who knows what else at the bottom of your email. Same goes with backgrounds, I don’t need some flowered pattern or whatever as a background, plain white please.

  9. tbax929 says:

    I couldn’t agree more. When you have a full keyboard, there’s no reason to use shorthand. The funny thing is, some of the shorthand takes longer to type than just spelling out the word. I just don’t like it.

  10. tralfaz says:

    * Using a company email for private messages. You’ve got a personal account, so use it for your personal needs and don’t soil your company records with correspondence that could get you in trouble.

    Umm… those of us in certain fields are barred from using outside e-mail services while at work. (insider trading anyone?)

    • TriplerSDMB says:

      Then use your smartphone. If you don’t yet have one that has email on it, best to wait till you get home for personal emails.

      • nicless says:

        Some workplaces don’t allow you to have your phone on. I’ve worked in a call center where they didn’t allow that because they thought it was hurting productivity. So no access to your personal email and no phone out. Mind you, most people just kept their phone on in a desk drawer and spent even MORE time checking their phone because they had to be careful. Managers aren’t that smart. Of course, then I moved to IT in the same company and am now posting from work. So uh, if any of my bosses are reading this I didn’t mean you.

    • George4478 says:

      Then it’s a comment that doesn’t apply to you.

    • The Porkchop Express says:

      I rarely have personal emails that can’t wait until afterwork. Mind you, I’m at work right now and will probably check personal emails. If this was not allowed at all or not possible, I would just wait until I got home.

    • Cacao says:

      If you send personal emails from your work, you’re inviting your company into your personal life. Never a good idea.

  11. Sad Sam says:

    I would say, that at work, if you go back and forth on an email 2 or 3 times, it is time to pick up the phone or walk down the hall and talk things out.

    • humphrmi says:

      This really depends on the culture of the company. I’ve worked at multinationals that explicitly encourage people to keep conversations going on email so that there’s a trail of the discussion and how it worked out. Then in jumps some old timer who insists on talking in person, and the trail is broken.

    • InsertPithyNicknameHere says:

      While that may usually be the case, there are times when it’s very important to have a document of the communication taking place. I have to do quality review checks on other people’s work, so I email any feedback or requests for updates. And even if it goes back and forth because of questions (or, in some cases, just blind refusal from some people to do their jobs), I have to have that all on record so we can track trends of errors.

      • c_c says:

        I agree it’s nice to have documentation that I can go back and look at if it comes up down the road. I use Gmail to get my work email, and it’s really nice to be able to quickly find an email from 3 years ago about something I’ve completely forgot about since then. Also I send a lot of documents, spreadsheets, etc. back and forth with coworkers.

    • framitz says:

      We use local IM for quick back and forth, it’s very useful and maintains a record for future reference.

    • tralfaz says:

      This doesn’t work when you’re corresponding with 5 people involved in the issue, as well as keeping your compliance department notified of what is happening. Jumping to a phone call actually prevents resolution and can jack you up if someone questions the paper trail at a later date.

  12. bhr says:

    Here is a real one. ALWAY, ALWAYS double check your recipient fields before clicking send. A few years back I accidentally mail-merged what should have been 10 new clients in my BCC field. Instead I mailed nearly 600 current and potential customers via my CC field, leading to a LOT of angry email and phone calls, some demanding my firing and a few threatening lawsuits (CAN SPAM). Thankfully my boss stood by me, and we were able to fix most of it, but it could have been avoided with a 2 second double check.

  13. homehome says:

    If it’s not formal, then who cares? You know when to be formal and when you don’t have to.

    • Blueskylaw says:

      So you wear sweatpants and a torn t-shirt when you shop at
      Walmart but dress up when you shop at Saks Fifth Avenue?

      After all, you know when to be formal and when you don’t have to.

  14. Rachacha says:

    Other than mass e-mails where you were trying to protect somesone’s e-mail address, the only other way that I have used BCC was when I left an employer. It was sort of a tradition when people left to send an E-mail to everyone (about 100 people), telling them how much they enjoyed working with ALL of us, and how much they learned and appreciated everyone…it was usually BS, but because suzie quit last week and did it, John who left this week felt compelled.

    I had been with the company for over 10 years and at some point worked directly with everyone in the company. Some people I truly appreciated what they did for me (and the company), some I considered a great mentor, and others were my students, and there were a few close friends. Everyone else I simply tolerated.

    On my last day, I sent a BCC to about 12 people who truly impacted my life at the company and even to this day some 8 years later. I started the E-mail acknowliging the company tradition, and said I was going to break that tradition, and only e-mail those individuals that I had a special bond with, and if they received the e-mail, they were on that list. I touched on some of the specific things where I was grateful to know them, but never tied it to one specific individual (although the individula reading it knew it was meant for them). No one knew who was on the list, and no one mentioned it to anyone else as they did not want to risk hurting anyone’s feelings for not making it on my special list, but everyone who received it was thankful and planned to use a similar tactic when they left.

    I did say goodbye to everyone personally, but the e-mail avoided having to reminisce “old times” in person and the awkwardness of having a “gushing” goodbye with one person, and a simple “pleasure working with you” to the person in the next cube.

  15. RandomHookup says:

    I love watching what happens when someone sends spam to a long inactive email list.

    “Why did I get this?”
    “Why are you asking me. It’s not my list.”
    “Who are you people?”
    “Unscribe”
    “Unsubscribe — you idiot.”
    “Who is in charge of this list?”
    “How did I get on this list?”
    “Can someone turn this list off?”
    “Why do I have 200 messages about getting off some stupid list?”
    “Who is responsible for this list?”
    “If you would just stop responding, this would all die down.”
    “UNSUB List”
    “Please take me off this list!!!”
    “Would you people please stop filling up my inbox!”

    And it would have all gone away if everyone had ignored the initial spam message.

  16. SilentAgenger says:

    If you absolutely insist on forwarding me some article that has you in tizzy, for cryin’ out loud CHECK SNOPES FIRST!!!!!

    • HogwartsProfessor says:

      OH GOD YES. I see these on Facebook too. Whenever I do, I like to piss people off by looking it up on snopes.com and posting a link either in my reply or as a comment. Heh heh heh.

  17. framitz says:

    Not so much etiquette, but safety.
    Do not respond to or click links in any spam, ever.
    This actually can be an etiquette issue in a way, when your PC becomes infected and starts spewing spam to your address book.

    If you see spams coming from a friend, do the right thing and let them know they are likely infected. This happened to my brother in law a few weeks ago, and when I told him he was infected he got it corrected right away.

  18. daveinva says:

    “* BCC bombing. Use the blind carbon copy function to protect your recipients, not exploit them. Its use makes sense when you’re sending out a mass email but don’t want to share everyone’s address with one another. Don’t use it to secretively let others eavesdrop on your conversation.”

    This person has never worked anywhere. That’s what the BCC is *for*– to give situational awareness to people who need to be aware of a conversation but shouldn’t participate in it. In 15 years I’ve never known anyone to get sensitive about blind copying (NOT saying it doesn’t happen, but… never once have I seen it happen, and I live on email).

  19. isileth says:

    Another pet-peeve of mine is the use of CAPITAL LETTERS and no space between paragraphs or after a full stop.
    It makes the thing harder to read.
    As regards the signature, back in the day of dial-in connections, I used to connect to download the email, go off-line, answer them, reconnect to send them.
    A woman had a small piece of a song in her signature and when you opened her emails, the computer tried to reconnect to download the thing.
    We were in the same mailing list and she was very prolific, so I had to keep the computer from connecting, not to mention that listening to the same 10 seconds of music every time made me mad.
    In order to avoid this (and the viruses that exploited the possibility to add “rich” content in a signature) I switched to a daily digest.
    It was nice, apart from people who received a digest and didn’t cut it.
    So I had to browse through 8 pages of quoted text, to find new text.

  20. SmokeyBacon says:

    Oh, that second one is something that is so important. There are 2 people in our region at work that are just horrible with grammar/spelling. One, who is an admin (so hm, someone who should know better) is so awful I will have to email and ask her what she means by what she sent – and then she gets all pissy about it. I swear it is actually painful to see her emails sometimes. It is bad enough when they are intracompany emails, but when they go outside the company to our customers I just cringe.

    I do admit that I use emoticons on occasion, only intraoffice and only if I am worried that something I say could have the tone misinterpreted in any way, because sometime there is no good way to say something and it could sound bitchy even if you don’t mean for it to. Since it is hard to convey tone in an email it does help prevent misunderstandings a bit.

    Oh, and they need to add some sort of note about the reply all function – just because someone sends something to a group of people doesn’t mean that all those same people need to be on the reply (like a message to everyone to report back their forecast – only the person sending the request needs to know that info, not the 40 people who are copied just because they all need to send that info in).

    We have so many email issues at our office I can’t even list them all here, but the reply all thing is pretty universal I think.

    • Round-Eye §ñ‰∫∫„ÅØ„Ç≥„É≥„Çπ„Éû„É™„ÉÉ„Çπ„Éà„ÅåÂ•Ω„Åç„Åß„Åô„ÄÇ says:

      I encountered this once. This was an especially heinous case because the offender would reply to my inquiries by including everyone on the distro list in a futile attempt to belittle me in public as to how I could be so stupid and not understand her. I then replied to everyone and digitally red-penned her email. I actually copied her email into an MSWord document, used the comments and track change function to demonstrate how she was butchering the English language, then attached it to a Reply All email. It was quite amusing for me, and I got several high-fives and “thank yous” as a result.

  21. giax says:

    6. Never use comic sans.

    • Princess Beech loves a warm cup of treason every morning says:

      Ditto. Especially colored pink in signatures.

      I used to do that, back when emails are pretty new (and exciting!) to me. But now I stick to the simple fonts (Arial, Times New, or Verdana [fanciest I get].

  22. scoosdad says:

    They missed one big one, especially with business-to-business email:

    * Don’t use ‘stationery’ backgrounds on business email if you’re the originator. Nothing looks less professional than a long chain of responses set on a background of peach colored paper with flowers running up the left margin.

    Sometimes I’ll switch my reply briefly back to plain text and then back to HTML again in Outlook while I’m composing it, just to get rid of the background. There used to be an easy way to do it, but the newer rev of Outlook hides that function pretty well.

  23. evilpete says:

    Bcc’ing is useful with micro managing managers. Years ago I had one and I bcc’ed him to no end. He stopped micromanaging me…

  24. bhr says:

    Here is a real one. ALWAY, ALWAYS double check your recipient fields before clicking send. A few years back I accidentally mail-merged what should have been 10 new clients in my BCC field. Instead I mailed nearly 600 current and potential customers via my CC field, leading to a LOT of angry email and phone calls, some demanding my firing and a few threatening lawsuits (CAN SPAM). Thankfully my boss stood by me, and we were able to fix most of it, but it could have been avoided with a 2 second double check.

  25. JJEagleHawk says:

    *From the original article:

    “12. Keep signatures simple

    Using an automatic signature for your email messages is a great feature and is definitely encouraged. What is not encouraged are those email signatures 20 lines long. There is simply no need for this! Convention dictates typically your name, basic contact information, position, and maybe a website link. Pictures of your adorable puppy or long Shakespearean quotes are definitely to be avoided.”

  26. LogicalOne says:

    Two more:

    1) If you are in HR, don’t email me with any attachments or text which contain confidential information such as my SSN, contact info, salary, age, etc.

    2) Other websites – Other than a temporary password, don’t email me back with my new password in plain text!!

  27. HogwartsProfessor says:

    Here’s one that bugs me: when I email someone and they never answer me. I’m sitting here waiting on information that I need to do my job. Please answer me in a timely manner!

    Same if I call and always get voice mail and they never call back. Grrrr.

    • Not Given says:

      If you keep emailing them at least you have a ‘paper trail’ proving you’re trying to do your job.

  28. Aliciaz777 says:

    I can’t stand the chain emails and the “FWD: FWD: FWD: FWD: CUTE LITTLE KITTIES OMG CLICK THIS SO FUNNY AND CUTE!!!!!!!” type emails. They irk me to no end. At one point a few years ago they started flooding my inbox so bad from literally 90% of the people who had my email that I had to send out an email to them all that pretty much said “This is the third email address I’ve created in an effort to stop getting these emails and other spam so PLEASE DO NOT SEND ME ANYMORE!” Thankfully, they all got the hint and now the only emails I get are important ones which are no longer pushed to page 4 by spam.

    I’d like to find the person who started the trend of sending those, print out a bunch, and drown them in the huge pile of papers lol.

    • scoosdad says:

      A close relative of mine engages in the same idiotic behavior, only from her work email account.

      So I’ve set up filters for myself and a few other family members that look at the incoming email. If it’s from her work account, and it also starts with ‘FWD:’ then it goes to the junk mail folder. Ahhh, much better now.

  29. Paul @ The Frugal Toad says:

    I used to work for a fortune 500 company in finance and I remember the Controller calling a meeting because of the overuse of email. His message: 1) Get off your ass and go talk to each other instead using email as a conversation mechanism 2) Stop cc’ing everyone when you need to communicate to a few individuals.

  30. Mr. Bill says:

    Don’t forward any Republican Fox News lies about Obama.