(БРАТСТВО)

Can New McDonald’s CEO Turn Tide Against Antibiotic Abuse In Farm Animals?

Since the Food and Drug Administration won’t set down hard-and-fast rules on non-medical antibiotic use in farm animals, it’s up to the farmers and the companies who buy the most meat to make a change that will cut down on the use of drugs that result in bigger cows, pigs, and chickens, but also put us all at risk for drug-resistant pathogens. [More]

(Adam Fagen)

Foods That Make People Sick With E. Coli: Beef, Plants Grown In Rows

There are three different agencies in the federal government that handle different types of foodborne illnesses and separate aspects of those illnesses. While two outbreaks might be caused by the same pathogen, which agency handles them depends on whether the food contains meat or not. This is sort of inefficient. [More]

Will The FDA Ever Get Around To New Warning Labels For Cigarettes?

John Wayne Hill

In June 2009, the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act became law, directing the Food and Drug Administration to not only create larger health warnings, but to include graphic images in the labels. And when the U.S. Supreme Court shot down a tobacco-industry fight against these labels in April 2013, it was supposed to get the ball rolling again on these new warnings. But in the years since, there’s been no apparent movement on the matter and the FDA won’t say when, or even if, these Congressionally mandated labels will become a reality. [More]

Philip Morris Does Horrible Job Of Defending Itself After John Oliver Mocking

Philip Morris Does Horrible Job Of Defending Itself After John Oliver Mocking

On Sunday night, John Oliver called out the tobacco industry, and particularly Philip Morris, for the practice of threatening small and poor countries with complicated, expensive international trade lawsuits if they try to strictly regulate cigarette marketing. But while Big Tobacco has the coffers to pay for costly legal battles, it does a really poor job of trying to defend its actions. [More]

(Chocolate Reviews)

FDA Finds Some Dark Chocolate Products Contain Milk, Despite Their Labels

‘Tis the season for showing you remembered to buy something for your loved one, but if the object of your affection is lactose-intolerant, you might want to think twice before splashing out on a deluxe dark chocolate Valentine’s Day gift. [More]

(ChrisGoldNY)

Third Candy Apple Maker Recalls Treats For Possible Listeria Contamination

Earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned consumers to avoid some caramel apples after at least 30 people in 10 states have been infected with Listeriosis due to Listeria monocytogenes. This week a third candy maker is recalling caramel apples, the government said, out of concern that its apples may be tainted with Listeria as well. [More]

(Andy Jones)

FDA To End Full Ban On Blood Donations From Gay, Bisexual Men

As things currently stand, any man who has had sex with another man at any point in the last three decades is generally forbidden from donating blood in the U.S. But the head of the Food and Drug Administration announced today that it will begin updating the restrictions so that gay and bisexual men who’ve been celibate for a year will be allowed to donate. [More]

(Marcos de Madariaga)

FDA: Going To The Mall For Your Ultrasounds Probably Isn’t A Good Idea, Even If It Comes With A Keepsake Gift

Any expectant parent would likely jump at the chance to see their developing bundle of joy. But while commercial ultrasound businesses might seem like the perfect place to catch a glimpse, the Food & Drug Administration is once again warning consumers that non-medical ultrasounds and heartbeat monitors aren’t exactly safe.  [More]

(Seer Snively)

What Does “Organic” Mean For Non-Edible Items? Not Much, Necessarily

Way back in 2002, the U.S. Department of Agriculture began certifying food and drinks that meet the federal standards to be called “organic.” Depending on the type of food, organic certification has different requirements. While a wide variety of products are marketed as “organic,” this label doesn’t necessarily mean anything when applied to a product that you can’t eat. [More]

(fujoshi)

FDA Going After Companies Offering Unapproved Ebola Medications

While the country is watching the news of every new Ebola case very closely, the federal government doesn’t want the worrying to get so out of hand that people start looking for medications to prevent or treat Ebola. Since there are currently none approved by the Food and Drug Administration, the government is already cracking down on a handful of companies promising to provide relief from Ebola. [More]

(Photo: Sjogren's Syndrome Foundation)

FDA: Use Of Vital Human Antibiotics In Animals Increased 16% In 3 Years

Even as a growing number of people — from consumers to scientists to physicians — expressed concerns about the overuse of antibiotics in animal feed, a new FDA report shows that farmers continued adding more drugs to their animals’ diets, and that almost every one of those antibiotics was purchased and administered without a prescription. [More]

(John Abella)

California Governor Vetoes Weak-Kneed Antibiotics Bill

Considering that 80% of all antibiotics sold in the U.S. are used on farm animals, and that most of those drugs are used primarily for growth promotion, you’d think we’d be happy to see a state like California introduce legislation that appears to ban the use of antibiotics to get fatter cows, pigs, and chickens. But it’s what that bill doesn’t do that has us concerned, and why California Governor Jerry Brown has vetoed it. [More]

Perdue Stops Using Antibiotics In Chicken Hatcheries

(Mark Turnauckas)

There’s some good news for a change for those concerned about the rampant use of antibiotics in animal feed. Perdue, the nation’s most well-known chicken producer claims that 95% of its chickens will now be antibiotic-free (sort of) after removing all antibiotics from chicken hatcheries. [More]

Food Industry Initiative Highlights How Little The FDA Knows About What’s In Our Food

(Jeanette E. Spaghetti)

For decades, the food industry has been able to use ingredients that are “generally recognized as safe” (GRAS) without approval from the FDA. When first used in the ’50s, this was intended to apply to ingredients, like vegetable oils and vinegars, where an additive’s safety is common knowledge, but in 1997, a backlogged FDA allowed food companies to merely submit their GRAS findings instead of the supporting data, creating a loophole the food industry has exploited to include a vast number of chemical ingredients that manufacturers claim are safe but which don’t go through a rigorous approval process. Feeling pressure from the public to pull back the veil on the GRAS process and its ingredients, the food industry announced a transparency initiative yesterday that may be a step in the right direction, but highlights just how little the FDA seems to care about the “F” part of its name. [More]

DEA To Change Classification of Some Frequently-Abused Painkillers Like Vicodin

DEA To Change Classification of Some Frequently-Abused Painkillers Like Vicodin

As a country, we sure do like our prescription painkillers. In fact, we like them a bit too much: Americans consume 99% of all hydrocodone drugs manufactured in the world. Prescription drug abuse — and deaths from overdose — are rampant. The DEA is hoping to stem the tide of abuse and overdose with a new rule that changes the way some painkillers are classified, and will make them harder for individuals to get. [More]

(.sanden.)

New Gluten-Free Labeling Rules Go Into Effect This Week

A year after the Food and Drug Administration laid out the rules for food manufacturers who want to label their products gluten-free, the new labeling requirements will go kick in this week. [More]

(Dan Domme)

Should Food Companies Tell Consumers How Much Sugar They Add To Products?

Looking at the label of any food product on grocery store shelves and you’ll find the total amount of sugar in that item. But does it matter how much of that sugar is from a food’s raw ingredients, and how much sweetener was added? [More]

Surgeon General’s Report: “We Need To Do Something” About Climbing Skin Cancer Rates

Surgeon General’s Report: “We Need To Do Something” About Climbing Skin Cancer Rates

Summer might be half-over, but there’s still plenty of time left to go tanning on the beach before fall madness sets in. But before you head out to catch some rays before Labor Day, the Surgeon General has some advice for you: don’t. [More]