Michael Saechang

Disney Not Happy About Snow White, Captain America Seen At Chinese Theme Park

Competition is great: when there are more options for something, consumers usually come out ahead. That applies to entertainment theme parks as much as to anything else: if there are more places to go, crowds will be mitigated, prices will be competitive, and amenities will probably improve. But “competing” doesn’t actually mean “duplicating the other guy’s stuff and displaying it at my place instead.” At least, it’s not supposed to.

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Alibaba And Fitbit Hold A ‘Super Brand Day’ Exercise Party To Celebrate New Fitbits

Alibaba And Fitbit Hold A ‘Super Brand Day’ Exercise Party To Celebrate New Fitbits

Alibaba and famous brand names do not historically have a great relationship. Just earlier this week, the e-commerce company was suspended from an international anti-counterfeiting coalition and its CEO withdrew as keynote speaker at the group’s conference later this month. The company is trying, though, and today had a Super Brand Day on the company’s Tmall e-commerce site. [More]

Great Beyond

Facebook Wins Trademark Victory Over China’s “Face Book” Beverages & Snacks

Five years ago, China’s Zhongshan Pearl River Drinks filed trademark applications for “Face Book” branded beverages and snacks, hoping to ride the wave of popularity for the social media platform even though it’s banned in the country. Today, a court in Beijing handed the real Facebook a rare victory for this sort of trademark case, revoking this use of the famous brand. [More]

Adam Fagen

Court: Apple Has To Share The iPhone Name With Chinese Accessories Company

A Chinese company that peddles purses and wallets bearing the IPHONE name has the right to keep selling those products, despite Apple’s efforts to keep the trademark all for itself. [More]

Senators Call On FTC To Do Something About Misleading Fashion Sites

Senators Call On FTC To Do Something About Misleading Fashion Sites

It seems that someone in the offices of Senators Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) or Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI), or perhaps both senators, has either ordered clothing from a misleading China-based site or read Buzzfeed recently. Both senators announced today that they’ve sent a letter to Federal Trade Commission chair Edith Ramirez, urging the FTC to take action against sites that advertise great deals and don’t deliver what customers expected. [More]

Site vs. reality, reflected in actual orders placed by CBS DFW reporter Cristin Severance  (photo: CBS DFW)

Facebook Will Maybe Start Doing Something About Ads For Shady Clothing Sites

You may have seen ads on Facebook or elsewhere online for what look like decent quality and trendy clothes at rock-bottom prices. They have some satisfied customers, but many of these sites offer ill-fitting clothes that barely resemble their photos. When shady overseas fashion purveyors advertise on Facebook to find new customers, does Facebook have any responsibility for what happens next? [More]

(achimh)

Fake Apple Stores Becoming Less Popular In China Again

At times, the thirst for new Apple products is so great in China that fake Apple Stores selling real Apple products pop up, with helpful uniformed employees ready to sell you any gray-market iThingy you might want. Now Reuters reports that some of those stores have switched over to selling local Chinese phone brands like Huawei. [More]

Drug-Resistant Superbug Gene Found In At Least 19 Countries Since November

A map showing the countries in which the MCR-1 gene has been confirmed.

You’ve likely never been prescribed the antibiotic colistin, because it’s a drug of last resort that you turn to after only other antibiotics have failed. But there’s a gene that can make bacteria resistant to colistin, and a new report says it’s been found in at least 19 countries on four continents. [More]

Netflix Goes Live In More Than 130 New Countries (But Not China)

Netflix Goes Live In More Than 130 New Countries (But Not China)

In the span of an hour this morning, Netflix more than tripled the number of countries in which it offers service, effectively serving everywhere in the world with one huge exception: China. [More]

(Elaine with Grey Cats)

Can You Safely Wash Fine China In The Dishwasher? Maybe.

When you have guests over for a fancy gathering, or you’re celebrating an important holiday, some families like to haul out china. Maybe it’s a family heirloom, or maybe it was a pricey wedding gift that you regret not exchanging for a KitchenAid mixer. Either way, the more guests you have, the more important this question becomes: can fine china go in the dishwasher? [More]

GM Looking To Import Made-In-China Buick For U.S. Customers

GM Looking To Import Made-In-China Buick For U.S. Customers

General Motors’ Buick — perhaps the oldest existing name in U.S. car brands — is trying to re-introduce itself to younger American consumers who associate it with a stuffier generation. But Buick is a hit in China, with a number of models manufactured specifically for the local market. One of those cars — the Buick Envision — may end up being GM’s first China-made car to be imported to the U.S. [More]

(tinakugler)

In India And China, You Can Buy Your Next Home Without Leaving Home

Depending on how you feel about the way real estate works now, the idea of sticking a house in your Internet shopping cart and clicking “Buy” may or may not appeal to you. Advances in technology mean that you can buy a new house without even going outside, and get a discount for doing so…in India. [More]

Alibaba Will Expedite Counterfeit Takedowns For Some Name Brands

Alibaba Will Expedite Counterfeit Takedowns For Some Name Brands

In the months since Chinese e-commerce behemoth Alibaba began trading shares in its Cayman Islands-based holding corporation on the New York Stock Exchange, entities ranging from the Chinese government to the owner of Gucci have accused the company of knowingly profiting from counterfeit branded goods. Alibaba has promised to improve its capacity to ferret out fakes, and now says that it will take down some brands’ items more quickly. [More]

(Mike Mozart)

KFC Sues Three Chinese Companies For Allegedly Starting Rumors It Uses Eight-Legged Chickens

Kentucky Fried Chicken wants customers to know that it hasn’t created mutant chickens with eight legs and six wings to fill its big ol’ buckets. While one might think the notion of a chicken with more than two wings and two legs is a bit farcical, a rumor of such genetically modified birds has been circulating in China, leading KFC’s parent company to file lawsuits against three Chinese businesses for allegedly concocting and publicizing fabricated stories about the chain’s products on social media. [More]

(Eric Norris)

Chinese Luxury Car Buyers Shop The Very Unglamorous Gray Market

Here at Consumerist, we’re fascinated with the global gray market: the system of parallel imports that gives us Omega watches from Paraguay at Costco and a pirate Trader Joe’s store in Canada. There are even bigger things that trade on the gray market, though: in Shanghai, there’s a place where luxury car buyers can save money by purchasing cars that haven’t been imported through official channels. [More]

Alibaba Vows To Step Up Efforts To Prevent Online Sales Of Counterfeit Goods

Alibaba Vows To Step Up Efforts To Prevent Online Sales Of Counterfeit Goods

It’s been a whirlwind week for the relationship between e-commerce giant Alibaba and the Chinese government. After one agency released a report criticizing the company for allowing fake goods to be sold online through its vendors, and another government group promised to crack down on such practices in general, Alibaba is now pledging to shape up its business practices.

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(Pamela Greer)

China’s Ministry Of Commerce Pledges To Crack Down On Counterfeit Items Sold Online

After another Chinese government agency scolded e-commerce giant Alibaba and its eBayesque subsidiary Taobao over its mismanagement of its business and for selling or allowing bogus goods to be sold to the public, the country’s Ministry of Commerce has pledged to crack the whip on the online industry and try harder to prevent the sale of counterfeit goods.

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Chinese Government Accuses Alibaba Of Selling Fake Goods, Taking Bribes

Chinese Government Accuses Alibaba Of Selling Fake Goods, Taking Bribes

China-based e-commerce megasite Alibaba is catching heat in its home country following a government report that scolds the company for lax controls over the sale of bogus goods to consumers, along with allegations of bribery and using its size to bully merchants from working with Alibaba’s competitors. [More]