It’s True: Crystal Pepsi Is Coming Back For All Those People Who Forgot They Hated It The First Time Around

It’s True: Crystal Pepsi Is Coming Back For All Those People Who Forgot They Hated It The First Time Around

For better or worse (mostly worse), I’ve always been a big fan of soda, so when I was a senior in high school in Florida in the early ’90s, I was over the moon that my area would get to try Crystal Pepsi before some other parts of the country. Then I tasted the underwhelming clear cola for myself. Now, more than 20 years later, Pepsi gets to introduce a new generation of cola lovers to that same unique disappointment, with a limited time re-release of Crystal Pepsi that we’re pretty sure the world could have done without. [More]

Great Beyond

How Well Do You Know Companies’ Former Names?

Maybe you know that David Bowie was born David Jones, or that the St. Louis Cardinals were previously the St. Louis Browns, Brown Stockings, and Perfectos, but did you know that PayPal was originally called Confinity, or that Yahoo was briefly named “Jerry and David’s Guide to the World Wide Web”? [More]

Six Flags In Talks To Open Amusement Parks In Saudi Arabia

Six Flags In Talks To Open Amusement Parks In Saudi Arabia

Weeks after announcing plans to enter the Middle East market with an amusement park in the United Arab Emirates, Six Flags revealed this morning that the company is in talks to possibly open multiple parks in Saudi Arabia. [More]

Former Presidential Candidate Must Pay $25,000 For Using “Eye Of The Tiger” Without Permission

Former Presidential Candidate Must Pay $25,000 For Using “Eye Of The Tiger” Without Permission

A lot of musicians find out after the fact that one of their songs is being used, without permission, by a politician at rallies and other events, but many of those artists don’t go so far as to actually sue the candidate. However, recently released election records show that the campaign for former presidential candidate Mike Huckabee has agreed to pay $25,000 to settle a lawsuit over its use of Survivor’s 1982 fist-pumper “Eye of the Tiger.” [More]

Steve Swain

Kroger Accuses Visa Of Using Threats To Force Supermarkets To Accept Less Secure Debit Cards

Another week, another large retailer accusing Visa of forcing stores to accept debit cards in a way that it is not as secure as it could be — and which will cost the retailer more money to process. [More]

Adam Fagen

Airbnb Claims It Can’t Be Held Responsible For Illegal Rental Listings

Airbnb is suing the city of San Francisco, claiming that a recently approved city ordinance intended to hold the home-rental site more accountable for illegal landlods runs afoul of federal laws that protect website operators from content published by third parties. [More]

Ford Dealership Swipes Video Game Art For Ad; Doesn’t Understand How DMCA Works

Ford Dealership Swipes Video Game Art For Ad; Doesn’t Understand How DMCA Works

We live in an age where a digital copy of just about any piece of artwork is obtainable for free with a couple of clicks and taps on your computer or phone. That doesn’t mean you can just use said artwork in an ad to tell people about some deal on a 2016 Ford Focus. [More]

14 Excuses AT&T Gave Customers For Not Blocking Robocalls

jetsetpress

A few weeks back, AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson inaccurately claimed that his company can’t offer free robocall-blocking technology because it needs permission from the FCC first. With that explanation debunked, a number of AT&T customers tried to give Darth Randy their permission to install these call-blocking services. As you might expect, the responses from AT&T were a mixed bag of fictions and excuses. [More]

SchuminWeb

Senators Trying To Strike Down Vermont GMO Labeling Law At Last Minute

Two years ago, Vermont became the first state to pass a law requiring clear disclosures of foods containing genetically modified/engineered ingredients. A number of packaged food giants — including PepsiCo, Mars Inc., General Mills, and Campbell Soup Co. — have already made the decision to label their products on a nationwide basis in advance of the July 1 start of the new rules. With that deadline approaching, a pair of agribusiness-backed senators have introduced legislation that would kill the Vermont law, prevent other states from enacting similar regulations, and give companies two years to create a label with little to no information. [More]

Can You Remember What Happened This Week? Prove It!

James LeVeque

Another week has passed, and more events have occurred, some of which we’ll eventually forget about entirely or mangle into vague, hazily remembered recollections. But let’s focus on the here and now, and see what we can recall about the last few days, shall we? [More]

Pilot Who Failed Drug Test Can’t Try To Use DNA To Prove He Was Clean

Steven Depolo

Imagine you’re one of the many American workers subject to random tests for the presence of drugs or alcohol in your system, and a test turns up high levels of heroin and cocaine. If you contend that the lab must have mixed up your urine sample with someone else’s should you be able to demand a DNA test to prove your innocence? If you’re a pilot, the answer is no. [More]

Ben Schumin

Walmart Trying To Cut Back On Calls To Cops By Offering Small-Time Shoplifters Chance To Reform

Police who work near any large retail store are probably all too familiar with responding to calls for shoppers caught trying to make off with a pack of socks or a pilfered Pepsi. A test program at Walmart aims to reduce these nuisance calls by giving small-time shoplifters a second chance. [More]

Wells Fargo Must Remove Signs Built To “Photo Bomb” New Minnesota Vikings Stadium

Wells Fargo Must Remove Signs Built To “Photo Bomb” New Minnesota Vikings Stadium

Our brief regional nightmare is over, after a federal court ordered Wells Fargo to take down two rooftop signs erected to cash in on the impending media coverage of the new Minnesota Vikings stadium in Minneapolis. [More]

5 Times The Cable Industry Embarrassed Itself During Today’s Senate Hearing

5 Times The Cable Industry Embarrassed Itself During Today’s Senate Hearing

As mentioned in the earlier story about Sen. Claire McCaskill’s customer disservice call to her pay-TV provider, the Missouri senator and others on the Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations held a hearing today to talk to cable industry executives about their bad billing practices. Not surprisingly, the cable suits did a bang-up job of proving that these companies deserve their poor reputation. [More]

For-Profit College Or Fictional School: Can You Tell Them Apart?

For-Profit College Or Fictional School: Can You Tell Them Apart?

When coming up with the name for a institution of higher learning, you often want to find that sweet spot where academia, history, and marketability meet; and you also have to make sure no one else is already using that name. [More]

Listen To A U.S. Senator Try To Get Bogus $8 “Protection” Fee Removed From Cable Bill

Listen To A U.S. Senator Try To Get Bogus $8 “Protection” Fee Removed From Cable Bill

You’d think that being the senior U.S. Senator from Missouri would help Claire McCaskill get better service from her cable company, but you’d be wrong. As this recording demonstrates, the legislator has just as much trouble as the rest of us trying to get anything resembling decent service from her pay-TV provider. [More]

Discrete_Photography

Google Buys Gigabit Broadband Provider To Speed Up San Francisco Fiber Deployment

Building out a new fiberoptic network in a congested metropolitan area can be slow-going, which is why when Google announced in February that it was bringing Google Fiber to San Francisco, it planned to do so on the back of existing “dark fiber” lines controlled by the city. In an apparent effort to expand that model to privately-operated networks, Google has acquired a small, high-speed broadband provider already operating in San Francisco. [More]

David Blackwell

One Free Meal From A Pharma Sales Rep May Be Enough To Change Doctors’ Prescribing Habits

Your physician may have any number of degrees, honors, certifications, and other framed pieces of paper mounted to their office walls, but does any of that make them less susceptible to a glad-handing pharmaceutical sales rep who comes armed with some reading materials, free samples, and a lunch charged to their expense account? [More]