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Pediatricians Call On Mylan To Make EpiPens More Affordable

Following reports on the skyrocketing cost of the EpiPen emergency allergy treatment, drugmaker Mylan has been heavily criticized for putting profit over patients. Even the recent expansion of its savings card program has been slammed as being more beneficial to Mylan than it is for consumers. Now, the nation’s largest group of pediatricians are calling on the company to rethink its pricing of the drug. [More]

Evan Jackson

City-Owned Airport Can’t Reject Ads Just Because They Aren’t Selling A Product

If a city-owned facility is going to sell advertising space to bring in revenue, to what extent can the city restrict the content of those ads before crossing the line into government-ordered censorship? This week, a federal appeals court confirmed that when a city enacts a wholesale ban on certain types of ads, it’s gone too far. [More]

Have You Paid Attention This Week? Take The Consumerist Quiz To Find Out

Jim Fischer

Maybe the rest of the world thinks you’re smart — always coming to you for help setting the clock on their VCR or for recommendations on which wine cooler they should pair with their rice cakes — but inside you harbor doubts. “I can’t possibly know everything” you tell yourself while helpfully directing a stranger toward the nearest Fashion Cafe. “If only there was a way for me to think back over the past few days to see if I do indeed have perfect recall — wait, am I not wearing shoes??[More]

Ariel Dovas

Congress Looking At New, “Simplified” Way For States To Collect Online Sales Tax

With billions of state and local tax dollars going un-collected each year because a number of online retailers either aren’t required to collect the taxes or are shirking their responsibilities, a proposal circulating around Congress takes a new “simplified” (but really kind of complex) approach to get more e-tailers collecting sales tax. [More]

Jason Mrachina

Oakland Raiders File Trademark Applications For “Las Vegas Raiders”

Even though the Oakland Raiders have not yet received the NFL’s blessing to relocate (again), the team appears to be protecting a potential Las Vegas future from potential trademark raiders. [More]

Google Maps

Nation’s Largest Privately-Owned Bank Must Return $28M To Credit Card Customers

The nation’s largest privately held bank sold its credit card customers on add-on programs intended to help cover their accounts when they faced unexpected hardships. However, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau says the bank deceived customers about the reality of these and other programs and has ordered it to provide nearly $28 million in relief to hundreds of thousands of affected cardholders. [More]

As Sales Continue To Drop, Sears Borrows $300 Million From Its Own CEO

Scott Miller

As more shoppers go online — or turn to retailers that don’t feel like they’ve just given up — same-store sales at Sears and its corporate kin Kmart have continued to sink, leading the once-great department store chain to borrow $300 million from the hedge fund owned by none other than Sears Holdings CEO Eddie Lampert. [More]

When Do Identical Products Have Two Different Prices At The Same Store? When They’re Sold At Target, Obviously

When Do Identical Products Have Two Different Prices At The Same Store? When They’re Sold At Target, Obviously

Target’s pricing and labeling incompetence is so legendary that we now use the term “Target Math” to describe a situation where any retailer baffles customers by, for example, advertising a “sale” that is more expensive than the everyday price, or where percentages are irrelevant, or when the economy of buying in bulk is turned on its ear. The latest fuzzy math from Target involves charging two different prices for identical items, including infant ibuprofen and acetaminophen. [More]

Walmart Worker Turns Herself In To Police After Accepting $1,000 In Movie Prop Cash

Walmart Worker Turns Herself In To Police After Accepting $1,000 In Movie Prop Cash

When a movie or TV show needs stacks of cash for a scene, they don’t usually withdraw millions from the bank and hope no one walks away with it. Instead, they use prop money that will pass for the real thing on camera, but that any cashier with eyes would immediately notice is fake. So when some Walmart shoppers in Georgia managed to buy $1,000 of stuff with fake movie money, police were suspicious about the cashier’s involvement. [More]

McDonald’s Officially Recalls 29 Million Happy Meal Fitness Trackers Over Concerns About Rashes, Burns

McDonald’s Officially Recalls 29 Million Happy Meal Fitness Trackers Over Concerns About Rashes, Burns

Nearly a week after pulling them from Happy Meal packages — and subsequently erasing all trace of their existence from stores — McDonald’s has issued a formal recall of all 29 million Step-It fitness trackers over reports of skin irritation and burns. [More]

frankieleon

Office Depot CEO Roland Smith Stepping Down After Failed Staples Merger

The failed marriage of Office Depot and Staples has claimed another CEO. Nearly three months after Staples chief Ron Sargent made his sad exit, the Depot’s top exec Roland Smith announced his departure. [More]

Phillip Pessar

TV Networks Giving You More On-Demand Options To Combat Netflix, Cord-Cutting

Broadcast TV networks are freely available over the air, so you might think that they wouldn’t care too much about the growing number of people ditching cable in favor of streaming services. After all, viewers can still get the network shows and local news for the price of a decent antenna. Then you realize that networks are raking in billions of dollars each year from pay-TV providers and you see they have an incentive to try to keep you from cutting the cord. [More]

Grandfather Of Waitress Confronts Customer Who “Only Tips Citizens”

Grandfather Of Waitress Confronts Customer Who “Only Tips Citizens”

A Virginia restaurant customer not only refused to tip her waitress after a recent meal, but left a note on the receipt that implied the server was not a citizen and therefore somehow not deserving of a living wage. When the waitress’s grandfather heard about it, he called the customer out online and confronted her in person when she complained to the restaurant after the picture of the receipt went public. [More]

Comcast Now Says It Will Offer Next-Gen Broadband In Chicago At Lower Price; You Just Have To Ask

cftarnase

Earlier this week, Comcast announced that it was launching its higher-speed next-generation broadband service in Chicago, but the only price it would confirm was double the lowest rate charged by Comcast in the other markets where it had already offered this service. However, Comcast has now confirmed to Consumerist that folks in Chicagoland will indeed be able to get the lower rate — if they know how to ask for it. [More]

Erin Turowski

Have You Been Paying Attention? Take The Consumerist Quiz To Find Out

This summer and its Olympic games might feel like they will never end, but this week certainly will. That can mean only one thing… Actually, it means an awful lot more than one thing, but there’s just one item that we currently care about: Testing your memory to see how well you’ve been paying attention. [More]

Pandora May Go To Battle With Apple Music, Spotify With $10/Month Subscription Option

Pandora May Go To Battle With Apple Music, Spotify With $10/Month Subscription Option

Right now, most Pandora users are listening to music for free and turning the volume down during ads, with a handful of people paying for an ad-free version of the same service. Now comes a report that Pandora is looking to offer new options that would put the company in more direct competition with Apple, Google, Amazon, and Spotify. [More]

FCC’s Robocall Strike Force Kicks Into Action Today

FCC’s Robocall Strike Force Kicks Into Action Today

Last month, after FCC Chair Tom Wheeler called on the telecom industry to finally do something about the nuisance of pre-recorded, auto-dialed robocalls, AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson agreed to head up a joint private-public Robocall Strike Force tasked with actually doing something about these calls. Today, this elite squad of telephonic titans is meeting for the first time. [More]

guidedbycthulu

Justice Department To Phase Out Use Of Private Prisons

Around 15% of the nearly 200,000 inmates in federal custody are housed in privately operated prisons that have come under fire for allegations of poor treatment of prisoners and less stringent security measures — all at a yearly price tag to taxpayers of $639 million. Today, Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates announced plans to phase out the Justice Department’s use of private facilities over the coming years. [More]