Company’s Bulletproof Blankets Are Designed To Protect Kids During A School Shooting

While bulletproof products are nothing new, in light of the numerous school shootings in recent years, there’s now a new market for such items. From bulletproof backpacks to the newest offering of bulletproof blankets, companies are now in the business of protecting children at the place where they’re supposed to be focused on learning.

A company called ProTecht (get it?) says its Bodyguard Blanket is made from the same materials used by the U.S. military, and is a product that was conceived after the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School as well as tornadoes in Oklahoma.

It doubles as either a shield against 90% of all weapons used in school shootings in the U.S. (according to the company), or as protection to “stop that blunt-force trauma when that rubble is falling down on a child,” reports the Oklahoman (via Buzzfeed).

The blanket comes with straps that fasten around wearers with a lightweight pad on the back that’s made from high-density plastic, the same kind used in ballistic armor. It also protects against nails, shards of metal or other sharp objects that might be flung about or shot at the user.

The company tested the blanket at a shooting range, standing up against a 12-gauge buckshot, a .22-caliber, and a 9 mm, as well as others.

The blankets come with a price tag of $1,000, and are meant to be stored in a classroom so kids can lock the door and put them on quickly.

“Instead of bending over and hoping for the best, they’re afforded an extra layer of protection,” ProTecht’s managing partner explains.

ProTecht is now encouraging school administrators to adopt the Bodyguard Blanket as part of their lockdown protocol.

“It’s just sad that we’ve come to this in society, but that’s where we are,” the managing partner said, referring to recent shootings. “This thing gives kids an option, an alternative that will give them an opportunity to survive.”

Oklahomans develop blanket to protect youngsters in tornadoes or shootings [The Oklahoman]