Reader Wants A Job. We Give Him One!

In an email with the subject “b.s. economy,” reader Leo whined to us:

    I would like to know how many out there spent years and money (borrowed many that is) trying to do what we were all told to do, but after all the schooling and money, there is not enough employment to pay back the money. Individuals that are slowly becoming criminals by virtue of lender laws which they have no real control over. we here mr. bush talking about how great the economy is, but the economy doesn’t seem to represent those of us who are slowly but surely being bled dry by the economics of this so called great country. where do we turn when there is no where else to go. no good jobs, no good paychecks, no way to pay bills that grow larger as each day passes.

Yeah, that 5 percent unemployment rate sure is a bitch. The government really ought to pander to our self-entitlement more. But until that happens, and since you’re looking for a lucrative job, we here at the Consumerist would like to bravely suggest that there’s good money in the smell of rotting flesh.

No, we’re not talking fast food. Hell, we’re not even talking about funeral parlors (some week, we’re just going to dedicate our entire site to taking on those bastards. Walter Sobchak had the right idea with the Folger’s Can in The Big Lebowski). We’re talking about the exciting career of crime scene clean-up!

Meet Christian Cadieux, a man who makes his living deodorizing houses fetid with the smell of decomposing corpses, vacated bowels and rank offal. The Toronto Sun takes a look at his career… a career he picked as a way for him to retire before he was 40. Scooping up maggots is making that dream a reality.

Yes, “typical scenes are rife with biohazards — blood, brains, urine.” Sure, Cadieux has “spent several hours “chiselling” feces out of a toilet that hadn’t been flushed in years.”

But hey, the money’s right. Food for thought, Leo!

And You Thought Your Job Stunk [Toronto Sun]