(Ken Fager)

North Carolina May Be Next To Get Google Fiber

It’s been nearly a year since Google announced plans to expand its Google Fiber broadband and pay-TV service to new markets around the U.S., but the company has yet to say which of the 34 eligible cities would be the next to benefit from much-needed competition, but there are some indicators that folks in North Carolina may be getting on the Google fiberwagon. [More]

Organic Ground Beef Sold At Wegmans Stores Recalled Due To Plastic Fragments

Organic Ground Beef Sold At Wegmans Stores Recalled Due To Plastic Fragments

There are many things that are very delicious alongside ground beef when mashed into a hamburger patty or loafed into a meatloaf, but plastic shards are not one of those things. Customers of Northeastern grocery chain Wegmans have reported finding “small malleable plastic pieces” in their packages of organic ground beef. [More]

Consumer Advocates Ask Congress To Please Consider Actually Helping Consumers This Term

Consumer Advocates Ask Congress To Please Consider Actually Helping Consumers This Term

The new month and new year brought with them a new Congress, and with that comes an all-new legislative agenda. Lawmakers get to start over with the process of introducing bills and hopefully passing some laws, and consumer advocates are calling on the President and all the legislators on Capitol Hill to get moving on an agenda to help American consumers. [More]

(Paul Fidalgo)

Supreme Court Rules Homeowners Don’t Have To Sue Lenders To Rescind Mortgage Under Truth In Lending Act

A ruling by the Supreme Court on Tuesday made it a little easier for consumers to back out of mortgages under the Truth In Lending Act when lenders fail to disclose full terms of the deal. [More]

Until a recent update, images posted to Instagram when your account was private could still be accessed even after your account was set to private.

Instagram Fixes A Loophole That Allowed Public To See Private Pics

Some 300 million people have accounts on Facebook-owned photo-sharing service Instagram, and while many of those users are fine with letting the world see every image they post, some Instagrammers prefer to keep their pics private. However, until this weekend there was a loophole that could give people unauthorized access to private images on Instagram. [More]

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler spoke about a possible net neutrality rule during a CES conference.

FCC Chair Hints That Broadband Reclassification Is The Right Path Toward Net Neutrality

During an appearance at International CES this afternoon, FCC Chair Tom Wheeler gave indications that he’s leaning toward reclassifying broadband as part of his plan for net neutrality. [More]

Samsung president and CEO BK Yoon presented the keynote for CES 2015.

Samsung CES 2015 Keynote: The Internet Of Things Is Here And There’s Pretty Much Nothing That Can Stop It

Here are the things we learned from Samsung’s CES 2015 Keynote address Monday evening: CEO and president BK Yoon has a lot of executive friends, the Internet of Things is already here, soon our entire lives will be “connected” and Back To The Future II references are getting old. [More]

The Year That Shouldn’t Have Been: The 50 Most Embarrassing Stories From 2014

Ron G

In the days leading up to a new year, most people take time out to reflect on the good and the bad of the previous 12 months. While there were some really great things – and not so great thing (Comcast/Time Warner Cable Merger, anyone?) that happened in 2014, there was also a seemingly endless supply of stories that left us wondering just who has control of companies’ social media platforms and why CEO’s just can’t keep their mouths shut. So without further adieu, here is Consumerist’s list of stories that make us go “What, The What?” [More]

What We Liked About 2014: The Editors’ Favorite Stories Of The Year

What We Liked About 2014: The Editors’ Favorite Stories Of The Year

The clock hasn’t even struck midnight yet, and already we’re reminiscing about the year gone by. For us here at Consumerist, 2014 wasn’t only about how many times our stories were read, or who was clicking where, but about the process of bringing those stories to our readers and how we felt about working on them. [More]

(Carbon Arc)

Today In Sad Food News: 80,000 Pounds Of Bacon Recalled For Misbranding

Let’s all pour out a little bacon grease on the ground for our fallen pork comrades, delicious bits of savory umami that will never reach the lips of consumers: More than 80,000 pounds of bacon have been recalled after a Florida company says the products were misbranded. [More]

(Ron Dauphin)

T-Mobile Agrees To Pay $112.5M To Settle FTC Mobile-Cramming Lawsuit

Rounding out a week punctuated by new accusations of mobile carriers overcharging consumers using a practice known as “bill-cramming,” one past lawsuit is being put to rest. T-Mobile agreed today to shell-out at least $112.5 million to settle a Federal Trade Commission lawsuit that the “Un-carrier” tacked-on unwanted third-party charges to customer’s bills. [More]

Verizon: We Can Basically Charge Netflix For Peering Forever And There’s Nothing The FCC Can Do To Stop It

Verizon: We Can Basically Charge Netflix For Peering Forever And There’s Nothing The FCC Can Do To Stop It

The FCC is facing a lot of opposition this year, but Verizon in particular just really seems to thrive on challenging the agency. The latest move from the telco giant is a message to the FCC that even if they use Title II to regulate net neutrality, there is nothing the commission can do to prevent interconnection fee spats like the one Verizon and Netflix had this year. [More]

(Mississippi Snopes)

CFPB: College Credit Card Agreements On Decline; Debit, Prepaid Card Agreements Increase

Since Congress passed the Credit Card Accountability, Responsibility, and Disclosure (CARD) Act in 2009, the cozy relationship between credit card issuers and institutions has fractured. But while the number of agreements between the two entities has declined drastically, that doesn’t mean banking on campus has gotten any safer for students. [More]

Photographer Still Trying To Claim Ownership Of Monkey Selfie

Photographer Still Trying To Claim Ownership Of Monkey Selfie

Even though the U.S. Copyright Office has explicitly stated that one can not register a copyright for “A photograph taken by a monkey,” the photographer whose camera was used by a monkey for a now-famous self-portrait is still trying to claim that he is the owner of the photograph and demanding that a website purchase a license to run the image. [More]

(sheridesabeemer)

Cruise Ship Diners Suspected Of Tossing Live Lobsters Overboard In Effort To Save Them

So a Canadian lobster walks into an English bar– er, bay, and he kind of scuttles. Anyway, despite whatever punchline you might’ve been expecting, there’s a story out there that Canadian lobsters are showing up in English waters, and not because they were in the mood for a 3,000-mile swim. No, the recent influx of foreign crustaceans is said to be the fault of guilty diners crossing the Atlantic on cruise ships — if the stories are to believed. [More]

(Smacks Well)

1-In-5 Shoppers Has Done Something Awful To Obtain A Coveted Holiday Gift

Because there’s this widely held assumption that people should get the thing they desire most during the holidays, and because a lot of people desire the same things, some holiday shoppers will cross that line between naughty and nice to make sure they check certain items off their shopping lists. [More]

(me and the sysop)

Ranchers Legacy Meat Co. Recalls 1,200 Pounds Of Ground Beef Over E.Coli Contamination

Sure, it’s Thanksgiving week and we’re all preparing to devour our fair share of turkey. But some consumers prefer a main dish that’s a little more beefy. If you’re part of that camp, you might want to check the label after a Minnesota firm recalled ground beef that may be contaminated with E. coli. [More]

(Adam Fagen)

Southwest Airlines Sued Over “Early Bird” Fees That Don’t Guarantee Priority Boarding

When you pay a $25 fee to board a flight — especially one without assigned seats — ahead of other passengers, you might be ticked off to arrive at the gate and find out that not only aren’t you in the highest-priority boarding group, but that some of the people in front of you didn’t pay any additional money for their place in line. This is why a pair of Southwest passengers have filed a class-action suit against the airline, claiming the airline’s Early Bird Check-In program is “deceptive, fraudulent, and misleading.” [More]