A diagram from the FTC complaint showing how millions of automated marketing robocalls were made each day under the guise of a political survey.

Telemarketers Accused Of Using Political Robocalls To Pitch Caribbean Cruise Packages

While people at various points on the political spectrum may disagree about many topics, one sentiment many of them share is a distaste for prerecorded phone calls from political organizations. Like them or not, they’re generally legal even if the recipient is on the federal Do Not Call list. But when you use a supposedly political telemarketing call to ultimately shill for a cruise line, you’ve crossed over into the dark side. [More]

(frankieleon.)

DEA Agent Says Legalizing Medical Marijuana In Utah Will Lead To Stoned Rabbits

There are many arguments for and against using marijuana legally in this country, whether for medical use or for fun, but one drug enforcement official’s reason for his stance against legalizing it in Utah is surely one nobody’s about to forget: He says wild bunnies will get high off the stuff. [More]

(C x 2)

Google Reverses Content Policy Prohibiting Adult Content On Blogger Platform

In an abrupt about-face, Google announced early Friday morning that it would reverse a content policy change made just three days earlier that banned the users of the Blogger platform from sharing sexually explicit or graphic nudity on their sites. [More]

What You Need To Know About Tomorrow’s Votes On Net Neutrality And Municipal Broadband

What You Need To Know About Tomorrow’s Votes On Net Neutrality And Municipal Broadband

On Thursday morning, the Federal Communications Commission will sit down to discuss and vote on two big issues — net neutrality and municipal broadband — that the cable and telecom industries have campaigned heavily to defeat and obscure. Because of these industry-backed efforts and the legalese involved, many consumers are having difficulty separating myth from reality. In an effort to cut through that haze, we’ve attempted to answer the most pressing questions about these two topics before tomorrow’s vote. [More]

(Michael G. Chan)

Hungry Shoppers Also Buy More Non-Food Stuff

It’s a long-held belief that shopping while hungry leads to a larger than normal grocery bill. A new study claims that you might want also want to avoid hitting the department store on an empty stomach. [More]

(frankieleon)

Is Your Social Security Number A Public Record? Depends Where You Live

A pile of sensitive personal data from Florida residents is now on the loose online. But it wasn’t leaked from a hack or a breach. It was from a completely legitimate public records dump by the state’s former governor. [More]

(Lisa Brewster)

Prize-Linked Bank Accounts Combine Savings And Playing The Lottery

Would you pay to enter a sweepstakes that it’s impossible to lose? Late last year, our representatives in Congress and the President all agreed on something, a bill called the American Savings Promotion Act. It made prize-linked savings accounts, something that serves as a combination lottery and savings vehicle, legal for United States banks. [More]

February Food And Supplement Recall Roundup: Curse Of The Contaminated Cumin

February Food And Supplement Recall Roundup: Curse Of The Contaminated Cumin

In this month’s Recall Roundup for food and supplements, some cumin became contaminated with peanut protein, then spread its potentially deadly payload everywhere from ethnic markets to the hot bar at Whole Foods. Pet food marketed for raw feeding of dogs and cats contains bacteria that can harm humans and pets alike. Oh, and there was some more undeclared knockoff Viagra masquerading as a “bee pollen” dietary supplement. [More]

(Teresa RS)

FAA Allowing Companies To Start Claiming Territory On The Moon

As if splashing corporate names and logos all over our stadiums, arenas and every billboard on every highway and byway wasn’t enough, the Federal Aviation Administration says it’s allowing companies to start claiming landing and launching spots… on the moon. [More]

(Ken Fager)

North Carolina May Be Next To Get Google Fiber

It’s been nearly a year since Google announced plans to expand its Google Fiber broadband and pay-TV service to new markets around the U.S., but the company has yet to say which of the 34 eligible cities would be the next to benefit from much-needed competition, but there are some indicators that folks in North Carolina may be getting on the Google fiberwagon. [More]

Organic Ground Beef Sold At Wegmans Stores Recalled Due To Plastic Fragments

Organic Ground Beef Sold At Wegmans Stores Recalled Due To Plastic Fragments

There are many things that are very delicious alongside ground beef when mashed into a hamburger patty or loafed into a meatloaf, but plastic shards are not one of those things. Customers of Northeastern grocery chain Wegmans have reported finding “small malleable plastic pieces” in their packages of organic ground beef. [More]

Consumer Advocates Ask Congress To Please Consider Actually Helping Consumers This Term

Consumer Advocates Ask Congress To Please Consider Actually Helping Consumers This Term

The new month and new year brought with them a new Congress, and with that comes an all-new legislative agenda. Lawmakers get to start over with the process of introducing bills and hopefully passing some laws, and consumer advocates are calling on the President and all the legislators on Capitol Hill to get moving on an agenda to help American consumers. [More]

(Paul Fidalgo)

Supreme Court Rules Homeowners Don’t Have To Sue Lenders To Rescind Mortgage Under Truth In Lending Act

A ruling by the Supreme Court on Tuesday made it a little easier for consumers to back out of mortgages under the Truth In Lending Act when lenders fail to disclose full terms of the deal. [More]

Until a recent update, images posted to Instagram when your account was private could still be accessed even after your account was set to private.

Instagram Fixes A Loophole That Allowed Public To See Private Pics

Some 300 million people have accounts on Facebook-owned photo-sharing service Instagram, and while many of those users are fine with letting the world see every image they post, some Instagrammers prefer to keep their pics private. However, until this weekend there was a loophole that could give people unauthorized access to private images on Instagram. [More]

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler spoke about a possible net neutrality rule during a CES conference.

FCC Chair Hints That Broadband Reclassification Is The Right Path Toward Net Neutrality

During an appearance at International CES this afternoon, FCC Chair Tom Wheeler gave indications that he’s leaning toward reclassifying broadband as part of his plan for net neutrality. [More]

Samsung president and CEO BK Yoon presented the keynote for CES 2015.

Samsung CES 2015 Keynote: The Internet Of Things Is Here And There’s Pretty Much Nothing That Can Stop It

Here are the things we learned from Samsung’s CES 2015 Keynote address Monday evening: CEO and president BK Yoon has a lot of executive friends, the Internet of Things is already here, soon our entire lives will be “connected” and Back To The Future II references are getting old. [More]

The Year That Shouldn’t Have Been: The 50 Most Embarrassing Stories From 2014

Ron G

In the days leading up to a new year, most people take time out to reflect on the good and the bad of the previous 12 months. While there were some really great things – and not so great thing (Comcast/Time Warner Cable Merger, anyone?) that happened in 2014, there was also a seemingly endless supply of stories that left us wondering just who has control of companies’ social media platforms and why CEO’s just can’t keep their mouths shut. So without further adieu, here is Consumerist’s list of stories that make us go “What, The What?” [More]

What We Liked About 2014: The Editors’ Favorite Stories Of The Year

What We Liked About 2014: The Editors’ Favorite Stories Of The Year

The clock hasn’t even struck midnight yet, and already we’re reminiscing about the year gone by. For us here at Consumerist, 2014 wasn’t only about how many times our stories were read, or who was clicking where, but about the process of bringing those stories to our readers and how we felt about working on them. [More]