ThinkGeek Parent Geeknet Giving Hot Topic Three Days To Match Rival Suitor’s Offer

ThinkGeek Parent Geeknet Giving Hot Topic Three Days To Match Rival Suitor’s Offer

The love triangle between the parent company of online retailer ThinkGeek and its two suitors continues to heat up, with Geeknet now telling original suitor Hot Topic it has until Monday to match or exceed the higher bid from a new mystery rival. Because like so many real life dating situations, it all comes down to an ultimatum. [More]

ThinkGeek’s Parent Company Says A New Suitor Has Followed Hot Topic Into The Bidding Ring

ThinkGeek’s Parent Company Says A New Suitor Has Followed Hot Topic Into The Bidding Ring

What’s a little retail merger romance without a love triangle thrown in for good measure? After the news yesterday Hot Topic was buying online retailer ThinkGeek’s parent company GeekNet in a deal worth $122 million, the purveyor of sci-fi curiosities and comic book inspirations says another suitor has thrown in a bid to buy it. [More]

Hot Topic Buying Parent Company Of Online Retailer ThinkGeek For $122M

Hot Topic Buying Parent Company Of Online Retailer ThinkGeek For $122M

Mall staple Hot Topic is taking another chain under its umbrella for a $122 million price tag, announcing that it’s acquiring Geeknet, Inc., parent company of online retailers ThinkGeek and ThinkGeek Solutions, for $122 million. Commemorative T-shirts with cheeky sayings for everyone! [More]

Time Warner Cable Also Being Wooed By French Suitor

Time Warner Cable Also Being Wooed By French Suitor

It’s like something out of a romantic comedy that stars a couple of mid-level TV actors and gets dumped into theaters in mid-March: Fresh on the heels of being left at the altar by big-bucks beau Comcast, Time Warner Cable apparently finds itself being courted by a pair of very different suitors — a nice guy from Connecticut with rich friends and a mysterious French billionaire currently on a stateside shopping spree. [More]

That Was Then, This Is Now: How 72 Brands From ‘Mad Men’ Have Changed Since Don Draper Was In Charge

AMC

Because nothing gold can stay, AMC’s popular Mad Men has reached the final episode of its final, seventh season. Over the course of the show, we’ve seen pitches for a multitude of companies, brands, sports, groups and even cities. While some of those brands were created for the show, the large majority were very real — and some continue to exist today. In the spirit of nostalgia, we thought now might be the right time to check in on those products and companies pitched by Sterling Cooper (and its various rebirths), to see which have been lost to the mists of time, and which still remain. [More]

FTC: ‘Clinically Proven’ Menopause And Weight Loss Supplement Helps With Neither

FTC: ‘Clinically Proven’ Menopause And Weight Loss Supplement Helps With Neither

American consumers have spent $65 million on Amberen, a supplement meant to ease the symptoms of menopause and perimenopause. These symptoms can include hot flashes, insomnia, irritability, and weight gain. Did Amberen help with these symptoms, as promised? No, the Federal Trade Commission says: it mostly helped to lighten customers’ bank accounts, and has filed a complaint against the company that sells it. [More]

(20 buckz)

Nearly 35% Of Consumers Have Never Checked Their Credit Reports

While consumers are often urged to take advantage of the free once-a-year opportunity to request a credit report and make sure they aren’t riddled with errors, a new survey suggests many Americans simply aren’t heeding the suggestion. [More]

(Mike Mozart)

NHTSA Won’t Open Investigation Into Unintended Acceleration In Toyota Corollas

Toyota will not face another probe regarding unintended acceleration in its vehicles, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration announced over the weekend. [More]

(Eric Norris)

Chinese Luxury Car Buyers Shop The Very Unglamorous Gray Market

Here at Consumerist, we’re fascinated with the global gray market: the system of parallel imports that gives us Omega watches from Paraguay at Costco and a pirate Trader Joe’s store in Canada. There are even bigger things that trade on the gray market, though: in Shanghai, there’s a place where luxury car buyers can save money by purchasing cars that haven’t been imported through official channels. [More]

Beech-Nut Nutrition recalled nearly 2,000 pounds of baby food that may be contaminated with small pieces of glass.

Beech-Nut Nutrition Recalls Baby Food That May Contain Pieces Of Glass

That last thing a parent wants to imagine is inadvertently feeding their child a small piece of glass. Unfortunately, that issue was all too real for one baby food manufacturer recalling nearly 2,000 pounds of baby food. [More]

(Frankieleon)

Undercover Investigation Finds Serious Problems With Paid Tax Preparers

With the deadline for filing your annual tax return coming quickly, millions of Americans are putting their 1040s and other forms in the hands of largely unregulated paid tax preparers. But a new undercover report from the National Consumer Law Center finds that many of these preparers either don’t know what they’re doing or are allowing taxpayers to file false information. [More]

How Did The Hot Dog Get Such A Bad Rap?

Watchcaddy

When I was but a wee MBQ, I’d often sit in front of the refrigerator when no one was watching and eat hot dogs straight out of the package. “Gasp!” friends would later say when I recalled that guilty pleasure. “Do you even know what’s in hot dogs?” That widespread urban caveat of hot dogs as tubes of mystery meat has persisted, but is there anything actually scary about the contents of a hot dog? [More]

(funny strange or funny ha ha)

Because Technology Isn’t Going Away, FTC Creates Division Dedicated To Internet Of Things

With technology now touching nearly every aspect of consumers’ lives, the Federal Trade Commission wants to put more focus on privacy, big data and “smart” everything. To ensure it’s capable of protecting consumers from these rapidly evolving innovations, the agency announced the creation of the Office of Technology Research. [More]

No, IKEA Is Not Selling A Rainbow Pillowcase Called “PUTIN”

No, IKEA Is Not Selling A Rainbow Pillowcase Called “PUTIN”

The Internet, while a vast and varied resource rich in information on innumerable topics, is also a rascally son of a boomerang and will often regurgitate fiction as fact. To that end: Though a photo circulating Twitter yesterday appeared to show a rainbow-striped pillowcase called the “PUTIN” on sale at an IKEA store, the company says it doesn’t sell that particular item anymore and oh yeah, it was never named after the president of Russia. [More]

Google To Start Doing Its Mega-Personalized Ad-Serving Thing On TV, Too

Google To Start Doing Its Mega-Personalized Ad-Serving Thing On TV, Too

As dominant as it is and has been for decades, TV advertising is something of a crapshoot. Neilsen ratings are still the gold standard for every network out there, especially since they now finally track time-shifted viewing. But Neilsen still uses their own proprietary tech, and works on a sampling basis. In an age when every set-top box and most of the TVs they’re plugged into are themselves net-connected computers, there’s a more granular and accurate way to measure viewers and to advertise to them — and Google’s taking it. [More]

(me and the sysop)

Big Data Is Here To Stay. So Can We Use It To Make Recalls Actually Work?

Sometimes products are unsafe. From bacteria-filled food to shrapnel-shooting airbags, on occasion even the most conscientious company will find itself needing to recall a product if it turns out to be harmful to consumers. But recalls are a big pain in the butt all around. One of the biggest issues? Actually letting consumers know that the stuff in their hands or on their shelves has, in fact, actually been recalled. [More]

Facebook Clarifies: Bared Nipples, Hate Speech Not Allowed

Facebook Clarifies: Bared Nipples, Hate Speech Not Allowed

Facebook, like a lot of online sharing platforms with a large user base, frequently takes a “shoot first, ask questions later” approach to complaints about supposedly offensive posts. This has led to automated removal of rather innocent images — mothers breastfeeding, photos of nude paintings and sculptures — and other content that may offend some but was not intended to injure anyone. Today, Facebook tried to give users clearer guidelines about what sort of posts actually violate the site’s standards. [More]

(André-Pierre du Plessis)

Fraud Victim’s Impossible Choice: Eat $1,500 In Charges Or Be Banned From PayPal Forever

When a customer’s chargeback scheme left one PayPal customer down $1,500 and without the pricey headphones that they had sold, the person who sold the headphones was understandably upset. It’s wrong to rip anyone off, but they’re an individual seller rather than a faceless corporation. PayPal reduced the amount that this person owed to $700, but that was still $700 more than they really owed anyone. What’s a consumer to do? In this case, post to Reddit. [More]