(Ron Dauphin)

T-Mobile Agrees To Pay $112.5M To Settle FTC Mobile-Cramming Lawsuit

Rounding out a week punctuated by new accusations of mobile carriers overcharging consumers using a practice known as “bill-cramming,” one past lawsuit is being put to rest. T-Mobile agreed today to shell-out at least $112.5 million to settle a Federal Trade Commission lawsuit that the “Un-carrier” tacked-on unwanted third-party charges to customer’s bills. [More]

Verizon: We Can Basically Charge Netflix For Peering Forever And There’s Nothing The FCC Can Do To Stop It

Verizon: We Can Basically Charge Netflix For Peering Forever And There’s Nothing The FCC Can Do To Stop It

The FCC is facing a lot of opposition this year, but Verizon in particular just really seems to thrive on challenging the agency. The latest move from the telco giant is a message to the FCC that even if they use Title II to regulate net neutrality, there is nothing the commission can do to prevent interconnection fee spats like the one Verizon and Netflix had this year. [More]

(Mississippi Snopes)

CFPB: College Credit Card Agreements On Decline; Debit, Prepaid Card Agreements Increase

Since Congress passed the Credit Card Accountability, Responsibility, and Disclosure (CARD) Act in 2009, the cozy relationship between credit card issuers and institutions has fractured. But while the number of agreements between the two entities has declined drastically, that doesn’t mean banking on campus has gotten any safer for students. [More]

Photographer Still Trying To Claim Ownership Of Monkey Selfie

Photographer Still Trying To Claim Ownership Of Monkey Selfie

Even though the U.S. Copyright Office has explicitly stated that one can not register a copyright for “A photograph taken by a monkey,” the photographer whose camera was used by a monkey for a now-famous self-portrait is still trying to claim that he is the owner of the photograph and demanding that a website purchase a license to run the image. [More]

(sheridesabeemer)

Cruise Ship Diners Suspected Of Tossing Live Lobsters Overboard In Effort To Save Them

So a Canadian lobster walks into an English bar– er, bay, and he kind of scuttles. Anyway, despite whatever punchline you might’ve been expecting, there’s a story out there that Canadian lobsters are showing up in English waters, and not because they were in the mood for a 3,000-mile swim. No, the recent influx of foreign crustaceans is said to be the fault of guilty diners crossing the Atlantic on cruise ships — if the stories are to believed. [More]

(Smacks Well)

1-In-5 Shoppers Has Done Something Awful To Obtain A Coveted Holiday Gift

Because there’s this widely held assumption that people should get the thing they desire most during the holidays, and because a lot of people desire the same things, some holiday shoppers will cross that line between naughty and nice to make sure they check certain items off their shopping lists. [More]

(me and the sysop)

Ranchers Legacy Meat Co. Recalls 1,200 Pounds Of Ground Beef Over E.Coli Contamination

Sure, it’s Thanksgiving week and we’re all preparing to devour our fair share of turkey. But some consumers prefer a main dish that’s a little more beefy. If you’re part of that camp, you might want to check the label after a Minnesota firm recalled ground beef that may be contaminated with E. coli. [More]

(Adam Fagen)

Southwest Airlines Sued Over “Early Bird” Fees That Don’t Guarantee Priority Boarding

When you pay a $25 fee to board a flight — especially one without assigned seats — ahead of other passengers, you might be ticked off to arrive at the gate and find out that not only aren’t you in the highest-priority boarding group, but that some of the people in front of you didn’t pay any additional money for their place in line. This is why a pair of Southwest passengers have filed a class-action suit against the airline, claiming the airline’s Early Bird Check-In program is “deceptive, fraudulent, and misleading.” [More]

Bob Marley’s Family Is Starting A Line Of Branded Marijuana For Reasons No One Must Explain

(ChrisGoldNY)

In a branding combination that goes together like Bob Marley black light posters and college students, the late musician’s family says it’s starting a new line of Bob Marley marijuana. If you need someone to explain the relationship between Marley and Mary Jane, go ask your 19-year-old niece/nephew/son/daughter living in the basement. [More]

Check USDA.gov for more package labels.

1.2 Million Pounds Of Pretzel Hot Dogs Recalled Because Boxes Didn’t Disclose Presence Of Soy

If you’re allergic to soy you might want to put that pretzel hot dog down — I know, it’s cruel, but really: The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection service says close to 1.2 million pounds of frozen pretzel hot dogs have been recalled by a food company for containing soy lecithin, common allergen, but not listing its presence on the boxes’ labels. [More]

(MarteaDesignCo)

Massachusetts City Considering Banning Tobacco Sales Completely

While most cities have banned smoking indoors in public places, and companies like CVS have decided to stop selling cigarettes outright, no U.S. town has actually banned the sale of tobacco… yet. One Massachusetts city is considering taking tobacco off the shelves, a choice that would make it the first town to do so. [More]

(Belinda Hankins Miller)

1-In-4 Americans Turn To Payday Loans & Other High-Cost Financial Products

When discussing the topic of payday loans — or other high-cost, short-term financial products like auto-title loans and check-cashing — there can be a tendency to treat them like something that only a small percentage of Americans use. But a new report from the FDIC confirms that 25% of us have turned to one of these potentially predatory services in the past year, and that this rate has not been going down. [More]

(Christopher.V)

Senator Asks Comcast To Stick With Net Neutrality Beyond Its Legal Obligation

While its counterparts (we can’t call them competition, since that doesn’t exist) at other cable and Internet service providers have been drooling over proposed “net neutrality” rules that would allow ISPs to charge content companies for “fast lane” access to end-users, Comcast has consistently maintained that it is the only ISP to hold to the since-gutted 2010 version of neutrality (without mentioning that it’s legally obliged to follow those rules for a few more years). Now the Chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee is asking Comcast to stick to those rules even after it no longer has to. [More]

(Misfit Photographer)

Google Reportedly Testing Telemedicine Service To Give Consumers Basic Medical Information

Soon you might not have to leave the couch to find out whether or not your feverish symptoms could be related to food poisoning. While we’re not sure of all the particulars, Google is reportedly dipping its toes into the telemedicine waters. [More]

Facebook Reportedly Planning An App Where Nobody Knows Your Name

(SCHMEGGA)

At the moment where you might be suffering from Facebook fatigue — knowing that that girl from your biology class in high school has a craving for froyo gets exhausting — the social media company is reportedly planning a mobile app that’d be separate from Facebook, and would allow users to interact under pseudonyms. That way you’ll know when a stranger has a craving for froyo instead. Much more interesting. [More]

Hey You! Consumerist Is Looking For A Weekend Writer

(photographybynatalia)

As you may have noticed, we don’t do much updating on weekends. It’s not because we don’t want to. Maybe you could help us correct this lapse in coverage. We’re currently looking for a freelance writer to cover weekends on Consumerist to keep the good stuff flowing seven days a week. [More]

(Eric Spiegel)

Know Your Crowdfunding Platforms: Missions, Fees, And Rules

You have an idea, or you have an urgent financial need, and you want to turn to the Internet to make funding happen. Or let’s say some acquaintance is asking for money on Facebook for what seems like a cool project or worthy cause, but you wonder: what the heck is an “indie go go?” Why is the site itself asking me for a donation, too? [More]

(StellarViewer)

NHTSA Examining 163 New Complaints Of Unintended Acceleration In Toyota Vehicles

Just six months after it was announced that Toyota would pay $1.2 billion to close a case involving the unintended acceleration in a number of vehicles, the car manufacture is facing a federal probe over the same issue. [More]