You Can Now Finally, Really Truly, Opt Out Of Verizon Wireless Tracking “Supercookies”

You Can Now Finally, Really Truly, Opt Out Of Verizon Wireless Tracking “Supercookies”

Back in January, Verizon Wireless said they would let users opt out of a problematic universal tracking “super cookie” they had been using for years. This week, Verizon’s finally got their act together and the opt-out option is live. [More]

(Josh Bassett)

Lawmakers Receiving Anti-Net Neutrality Messages From People Who Never Sent Them

In the wake of the FCC’s vote to adopt the new net neutrality rule, Americans of every stripe have bombarded their lawmakers with feedback. Some applaud the rule; others condemn the action. And that is all well and good: it’s the American system of democracy at work, exactly as designed. [More]

Akamai's top 10 worldwide best average internet connection speeds for the end of 2014.

Virginia’s Got The Fastest Broadband In The U.S., But South Korea’s Still The Speed Fiend’s Place To Be

It’s that time again! Internet company Akamai keeps a sharp eye on the state of broadband at home and abroad, and delivers a quarterly report lining up just how we’re doing. But despite a whole huge pile of brand new data, the story remains the same: the U.S. still has a lot of catching up to do if we want to consider ourselves among the global broadband elite. [More]

Charter Digs This Whole Cable Merger Thing, Plans To Buy Bright House For $10.4B

Charter Digs This Whole Cable Merger Thing, Plans To Buy Bright House For $10.4B


In cable, merger mania isn’t just for the biggest players. The next tier down wants to play, too. And so we have the announcement this morning that Charter is planning to buy regional operator Bright House Networks for a cool $10.4 billion. [More]

T-Mobile's dynamic coverage map for the greater Washington, DC area.

T-Mobile Decides To Base New Coverage Map On Real Data From Real Phones

T-Mobile has been trying, for the past few years, to break away from the dominant competition in the mobile space by doing anything they can think of differently. And now, that extends to information for potential customers, too: their coverage map. [More]

How Baseball Became America’s Favorite Monopoly

(Allan)

In theory, spring has finally sprung. But forget crocuses and breathably warm air; the real sign of seasonal change is baseball, America’s favorite monopoly. Major League Baseball has the dubious distinction not only of being entirely exempt from antitrust law, but also being the only major league sport with such a privilege. With the start of the 2015 season still some days away, we have time to take a look at the history, and the possible future, of this quirk. [More]

FCC Chair: Net Neutrality Is “Right Choice” Because Big ISPs Want “Unfettered Power”

FCC Chair: Net Neutrality Is “Right Choice” Because Big ISPs Want “Unfettered Power”

The net neutrality rule hasn’t yet taken effect, but it’s been under heavy political fire for the past few weeks. Lawmakers hauled FCC chairman Tom Wheeler and other FCC commissioners in before a series of Congressional committees to justify (or, for dissenting commissioners, to vilify) the open internet rule. Those hearings, in large part, were heated and adversarial. But in a speech at Ohio State’s law school today, Wheeler took the chance to say everything that committee members cut him off from. [More]

House Committee Asks Same Net Neutrality Questions As The 4 Previous Committees

House Committee Asks Same Net Neutrality Questions As The 4 Previous Committees

FCC chairman Tom Wheeler was once again called before Congress today. His task: to justify the commission’s vote to protect consumers from the potential, likely harms of monopoly ISPs out to make a buck in any way they can. Or, in other words, to defend the agency’s recent vote on net neutrality. [More]

Google Fiber To Expand More, Adds Salt Lake City To List Of Lucky Locales

Google Fiber To Expand More, Adds Salt Lake City To List Of Lucky Locales

Google said earlier this year that the FCC’s net neutrality rule wouldn’t stop them from investing more in Google Fiber, and it looks like they really meant it. The service is now slated to expand to yet another location: Salt Lake City. [More]

Bill Seeks (Again) To End Over-Use Of Antibiotics In Farm Animals

Bill Seeks (Again) To End Over-Use Of Antibiotics In Farm Animals

Antibiotic resistance is a big problem. Farmers know it. Consumer advocates know it. Doctors, the CDC, and the FDA all know it. You know it. And the largest contributor by far to the crisis is the 80% of antibiotics that are used in industrial farming. And Congress is, once again, taking a stab at making agricultural antibiotic abuse against the law before it’s too late. [More]

News Sites Consider Moving Their Content Inside Facebook (Because That Worked So Well In The AOL Era)

News Sites Consider Moving Their Content Inside Facebook (Because That Worked So Well In The AOL Era)

There’s news in the world of news today, as some major sites are on the cusp of a new publishing deal with Facebook. The deal would actively keep their content inside of Facebook, rather than having links on everyone’s love-to-hate-it social network lead back out to other companies’ respective websites. But there is one specific lesson this deal highlights: even on the internet, you can’t escape the cycles of history. Somehow, everything old will be new again. [More]

Google To Start Doing Its Mega-Personalized Ad-Serving Thing On TV, Too

Google To Start Doing Its Mega-Personalized Ad-Serving Thing On TV, Too

As dominant as it is and has been for decades, TV advertising is something of a crapshoot. Neilsen ratings are still the gold standard for every network out there, especially since they now finally track time-shifted viewing. But Neilsen still uses their own proprietary tech, and works on a sampling basis. In an age when every set-top box and most of the TVs they’re plugged into are themselves net-connected computers, there’s a more granular and accurate way to measure viewers and to advertise to them — and Google’s taking it. [More]

AT&T Might Hate Title II For Broadband, But Is Happy To Use It For Millions In Refunds

AT&T Might Hate Title II For Broadband, But Is Happy To Use It For Millions In Refunds

AT&T just won an FCC proceeding against two smaller companies that were illegally charging them fees they should not have been. And while the telecom giant is poised to pick up a few million in refunds, that’s not the interesting part. This is: the section of law that worked out in AT&T’s big giant favor? That’d be exact same Title II that they claim will ruin internet business for everyone. [More]

Report: New Streaming TV Services Trying To Sidestep Net Neutrality Rule

Report: New Streaming TV Services Trying To Sidestep Net Neutrality Rule

A segment of consumers has for many years been begging for an unbundled, à la carte option for programming. That future is now taking its first shambling steps into our homes — only, it’s happening through the magic of the internet, and not in pay-TV subscriptions. But right now, we are in a particularly turbulent time for sorting out the rules of what is and isn’t allowed when it comes to giving preferential treatment to certain services. While the virtual ink is still drying on the brand-new, not-yet-implemented open internet rule, new players in the field of over-the-top internet TV are already trying to see just how far that rule bends. [More]

Whatever Happened To GeoCities, Lycos, Netscape & Other Giants Of Web 1.0?

(Ben)

Long before Facebook and Twitter, well before even Friendster and MySpace, before the first dotcom bubble burst, in the eons before Google was a glint in anyone’s eye, there was the first web. In comparison to everything that’s come after it, you could call it Web 1.0 or perhaps even just “the dark ages.” But for anyone born before, say, 1990, this was the dawn of our now-ubiquitous digital world. But as the digital giants of yesteryear have been replaced by the now-ubiquitous Facebook and Google, how many are still in play now? [More]

(me and the sysop)

Big Data Is Here To Stay. So Can We Use It To Make Recalls Actually Work?

Sometimes products are unsafe. From bacteria-filled food to shrapnel-shooting airbags, on occasion even the most conscientious company will find itself needing to recall a product if it turns out to be harmful to consumers. But recalls are a big pain in the butt all around. One of the biggest issues? Actually letting consumers know that the stuff in their hands or on their shelves has, in fact, actually been recalled. [More]

What Net Neutrality Opponents Are Saying Now — And Why It’s A Lot Of Hot Air

Steve

While supporters of an open internet are excited about the FCC’s recent net neutrality ruling, some folks in the telecom and ISP world are a whole lot less happy. Many of the big businesses affected by the rule had their say in February when the vote happened, but the recent release of the full rule (all 400 pages of it) this week has become an opportunity for many groups afraid of new regulation to once again put their concerns front and center in the limelight. [More]

Hackers Can Now Use One Free Tool To Hijack Your Facebook-Linked Login For Pretty Much Any Site

Hackers Can Now Use One Free Tool To Hijack Your Facebook-Linked Login For Pretty Much Any Site

Modern life means logging in to about a zillion different websites and apps every week, with about a zillion different accounts. But there are ways to streamline it all — for example, logging in to everything with your Facebook account, as millions do. That’s much more convenient not only for you, but for hackers who have a new way to target you: a free, easy-to-download tool that exploits a bug in those logins to let them hijack your account. Oops. [More]