Protect Your Home From Water Leaks With A Sensor

Unless you’re in the habit of strolling through your basement hourly, you probably wouldn’t be able to catch a water leak until it’s already significantly damaged your flooring. A way to stay on top of any problems is to install a water sensor.

Speaking from wisdom gleaned after suffering a basement leak a while back, the author of MoneyGreenLife preaches the virtues of the preventative tactic.

The writer recommends putting sensors in any rarely-trafficked areas in places where water disasters can occur, placing one in the laundry room as well as next to the water heater and basement. You can usually find three-packs of the sensors available from $30 to $60, using the investment to potentially prevent thousands of dollars of damage.

MoneyFail #7 – Protect Your Home With Water Sensor [MoneyGreenLife]

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  1. PHRoG says:

    I’ve got one of these in my hot water heater pan. :D

  2. LanMan04 says:

    LEAKFROG!!!

    • MrMagoo is usually sarcastic says:

      Yes! I have one of these under each sink, behind each toilet, and next to the condensation drains of our ac units.

      The one under the kitchen sink alerted me to a problem where the grout behind the sink had loosened up, and when the kids slopped a bunch of water up there it would drip down into the cabinet below.

      Last summer one of our condensation drains got clogged, and again the Leakfrog let us know before the water leaked out of the heater closet.

      At about $25/2 these things are definitely worth it.

      • Looseneck says:

        I bought a 2-pack for $7.99 at Woot! Well worth the price for the peace of mind.

        • chefboyardee says:

          Same here. Actually bought 3 2-packs, originally to give out the extras as gifts, and now use all 6 between my basement corners, kitchen, and bathroom sinks. They’ve saved me more than once.

      • flychinook says:

        If your refrigerator has an ice/water dispenser, put one behind there too. I work in water/fire mitigation, and the source lines for those things just love to leak.

    • ClemsonEE says:

      HOORAY WOOT.COM!!!!

    • Keep talking...I'm listening says:

      This times eleventy-seventy billion! The Leakfrog is both cute and awesomely effective!

  3. PBS says:

    My alarm system has water detector sensors so that the alarm system goes off in case of a water leak. I get the warning even if I am not at home.

  4. MerlynNY says:

    I have a sensor that allows me to run a cord across the floor. If water touches any area of the court, the alarm goes off. The best part is I believe you can contact the cords to make them longer.

  5. RecordStoreToughGuy_RidesTheWarpOfSpaceIntoTheWombOfNight says:

    This is like some straight up Star Trek shit, yo.

    “Captain, sensors indicate the presence of water in the crawlspace.”

    “Red alert, Commander Worf. Send Dax and an engineering team down there with all the corrosion resistant metal stucco lath we have on the station!”

    “Sir, inventory shows we have no corrosion resistant metal stucco lath on board!”

    “Then use carbon-fiber stucco lath!”

  6. BooCackles says:

    I have had sewage back up into my home 4 times and I am so getting these! The city I live in refuses to fix the sewage pipes (hey, they had a super bowl to hold!). I wont be able to prevent the poonami, but maybe it will buy me some time to save some of my things. (I wish I could go dump the contents of my toilets, showers, etc, on their floors and walls and see how much they liked it…) :P

    • Rachacha says:

      You might want to contact a plumber and see if thy can install a flapper valve on your main sewer line. This will allow waste to exit your home, but it will close if waste water begins to flow into your home through the waste pipes.

      • BooCackles says:

        One of our neighbors put in a check valve and still had sewage back up into her home (albeit not as much). Apparently the main sewage pipe the city put in was too small for the loads it would need to handle if there are heavy rains.(The city admitted this but still says there is nothing they will do.) At this point, I don’t even have to ask my neighbors if they had it back up- I just look for the dumpsters and the filthy carpet in the driveways. I had hoped the city would fix it’s faulty plumbing, but since that is unlikely, I think you are right- call a plumber. I’m not sure a sump pump will help given our downstairs is dry all other times and when we flood, our drains look like fountains of filth. I am hopeful the plumber can give us a proper fix so we can redo our downstairs. Wouldn’t wish this on anyone…

    • Nigerian prince looking for business partner says:

      We have a similar problem in my city. Every time we get a good rain, the combined sewer system is overwhelmed and dumps the sewage & rain water into the Ohio River, as well as backs it up into people’s basements. I’m very glad that I don’t have a basement.

    • Andy S. says:

      sewer Backflow Prevention Devices

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FMBznnNV-ss

  7. centurion says:

    My teenaged son called me at work one day. He said “Hey Dad, you know that alarm that goes off when there is water in the basement? It’s going off.”
    I made it home in record time to replae a failed sump pump.

  8. scoosdad says:

    Number one reason for water where it shouldn’t be is a burst hose on your washing machine, I’d guess.

    Awhile back I saw a device on This Old House that was way cool. It was made by Watts and it goes into your hot and cold supply lines and has fittings on it for your washing machine hoses. You plug the AC power cord from your washer into the device, and while your washer is off and not drawing current, the water supply to the hoses is shut off. When you turn the washer on and it starts to draw current, the device turns the water supply on again.

    If you’re thinking, ‘OK, what if my hose bursts while the washer is running? How does the water get shut off then?’ (This happened to me once.) Simple- it has a water sensor on a mini-plug cable that plugs into the device and it sits on the floor behind your washer. If it detects water back there, it also shuts off the water supply.

    It’s called the Intelli-Flow by Watts. I bought mine from Amazon. I had it installed by my plumber when I relocated my washer and needed to have the plumbing moved with it, but I could have done it myself. I mentioned having it installed to my insurance agent, and I even got a small discount on my bill.

  9. damageddude says:

    Great if your pipes are exposed. Mine are embedded in my house’s slab and looks to have developed it’s second leak in 6 years (leak detection company is coming next week). Hopefully it’s not under the wood floors, that was a pain (insurance covered it but we had to get out of the house for a week when the floors were repaired and stained).

  10. evilpete says:

    I 2nd the LeakFrog device. They work!

  11. keith4298 says:

    Cracked open a smoke alarm and soldered two wires to the test button. Then dropped the wires INTO the sump pump pit. If water rises too high, it starts beeping as if you pressed the test button on the smoke alarm — oh, and it also functions as a smoke detector and carbon monoxide detector for the basement furnace.

    Best of all, easy to change the batteries.

    • neilb says:

      That is brilliant. I will be doing this with those extra 2 detectors I have sitting around. Have you contacted LifeHacker? You should. Thanks.

  12. BooCackles says:

    One of our neighbors put in a check valve and still had sewage back up into her home (albeit not as much). Apparently the main sewage pipe the city put in was too small for the loads it would need to handle if there are heavy rains.(The city admitted this but still says there is nothing they will do.) At this point, I don’t even have to ask my neighbors if they had it back up- I just look for the dumpsters and the filthy carpet in the driveways. I had hoped the city would fix it’s faulty plumbing, but since that is unlikely, I think you are right- call a plumber. I’m not sure a sump pump will help given our downstairs is dry all other times and when we flood, our drains look like fountains of filth. I am hopeful the plumber can give us a proper fix so we can redo our downstairs. Wouldn’t wish this on anyone…

  13. Jules Noctambule says:

    I read the title as ending ‘With a Senior’. I think it’s time for new glasses.

  14. learned says:

    What is the name of the sensor, and where did you buy it?

  15. CalicoGal says:

    LeakFrogs are on sellout woot today