Price Comparison Apps That Help You Save On The Go

Your smartphone certainly costs enough in monthly service plans and data fees, so you can make it earn its keep by using price comparison apps when you’re shopping. Mobile apps help you pit retailers against one another to help you save money on your purchases.

Lifehacker named its top price comparison apps, and here are three that made its list:

* Amazon Price Check — Lets you quickly see if an item you’re about to buy is cheaper on Amazon.

* Google Shopper — Lets you compare online prices with local retailers.

* ShopSavvy — Does much of what Google Shopper does, and adds estimated shipping costs to online item quotes.

Click the source link to check out Lifehacker’s other favorites.

Five Best Mobile Price Comparison Apps [Lifehacker]

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  1. axhandler1 says:

    Also Fooducate! I love that app, I don’t care how many looks I get when I’m scanning 6 different types of whole wheat bread.

  2. Oranges w/ Cheese says:

    I did this the other day in Best Buy – we were looking for a simple antenna to get some local channels on our tv. So I scanned the UPC, bought it from Amazon right there in the store. Saved $10!

  3. mistyfire says:

    I have used a few of these. Was disappointed. For local stores it was limited. One, ShopSavvy, only gave me prices for WalMart and Walgreens. And I have a Fred Meyer, Sears, Kmart, JC Penny’s, etc in my area it had no price info from.

  4. mistyfire says:

    I have used a few of these. Was disappointed. For local stores it was limited. One, ShopSavvy, only gave me prices for WalMart and Walgreens. And I have a Fred Meyer, Sears, Kmart, JC Penny’s, etc in my area it had no price info from.

  5. mistyfire says:

    I have used a few of these. Was disappointed. For local stores it was limited. One, ShopSavvy, only gave me prices for WalMart and Walgreens. And I have a Fred Meyer, Sears, Kmart, JC Penny’s, etc in my area it had no price info from.

  6. mistyfire says:

    I have used a few of these. Was disappointed. For local stores it was limited. One, ShopSavvy, only gave me prices for WalMart and Walgreens. And I have a Fred Meyer, Sears, Kmart, JC Penny’s, etc in my area it had no price info from.

    • Dr. Ned - This underwear is Sofa King Comfortable! says:

      Clean your submit button, looks like you’re getting some misfires.

  7. scottydog says:

    Was at REI this weekend and decided to download and try out Amazons app. Of the 5 items that I scanned, amazon was about cheaper in every case, not even taking in to account sales tax. More often than not, brick and mortars are becoming a place for people to try things out before they buy them online.

    • Oranges w/ Cheese says:

      Yeah, we’re getting married next year, and I’m pretty sure we’re going to register at Amazon.. and only Amazon.

  8. The Lone Gunman says:

    This.

    THIS was the tipping point that started the decline and closing of Brick and Mortar stores.

    Before you flame me, consider the following:

    –In the B&M environment, you have three things; Price, Service and (depth of) Selection. Pick any two, as it is almost impossible to have all three.

    –In the B&M environment, those two things cost real money to provide. Hint: Service, as a function of payroll and training of employees, tends to get cut first as it is considered to be the most controllable cost by most B&M retailers.

    –In the B&M environment, a higher margin is required to keep the doors open for the public in order to cover the costs of the B&M location. Internet-only sites do not have this overhead cost to contend with.

    So–if people are going to treat B&M as the showroom for the Internet, what’s going to keep them open as sales are lost?

    • Kitty with attitude says:

      +1 Jobs are lost, wages are suppressed, benefits are not offered because the store can not make a profit, & the stores eventually close causing blight. Maybe Amazon can open stores where people can go in to check things out & then order product. Only loss prevention personnel & janitors will be needed.

    • Dallas_shopper says:

      It can work in reverse too, though. I used Amazon.com to research and compare wi-fi printers. I wanted one that day, but also wanted some feedback on the two models I was considering. If Amazon had been much cheaper than the B&M stores I was considering, I might have waited a few days for shipping to get the printer from Amazon. It was maybe $5. And I wanted the printer that day. So, B&M it was.

  9. KCDebi says:

    Amazon’s price matching is great, but I also love the access of reviews. I’ve saved more money by not buying poorly reviewed products than by ordering from Amazon, to be sure.

  10. ThinkingBrian says:

    I actually just bought a low-end Android smartphone (pre-paid cell phone) and I do use the AT&T bar code scanner that comes pre-installed as well as the bar code scanner app from the market place and I like it. But to me, it isn’t just about finding the best price tag around, its also about checking user experiences on the item as well.

    A good example would be the CAT dump truck I bought for my nephew, I have to make sure that I’m not only getting the best deal, but buying something that is safe for him to use at the age off 12 months.

    I will have to try some of these apps above if available on my phone. But I wouldn’t run around just to save a few dollars, I would just buy it instead right their. Good idea.

  11. coffee100 says:

    The Amazon vs. Brick and Mortar store issue wouldn’t be as big a problem if there were more than three suppliers for every product category.

    If America would stop establishing monopolies with massive barriers to entry in every market, real competition would solve this problem overnight.

  12. yurei avalon says:

    Yup, I pull out the smart phone and amazon things up in B&M stores all the time to check reviews on products and prices. If I need it now and can’t wait I buy the best available product in store according to reviews I can find online even if it’s a bit more then amazon. That’s usually for the times I go “Oh crap I forgot I need X for Y tomorrow!”

    Mostly we buy things from Amazon or other sites online ahead of time with plenty of researching for the best reviews/deals. We have a Prime membership in the household so the shipping cost is rarely an issue. And even if it doesn’t ship with prime I’d rather pay to ship something then waste time and gas going down to our local retail district and fighting traffic, especially at this time of year. I absolutely loathe Christmas, it makes it impossible to do your normal every day/week shopping for necessities. Running low on toothpaste or toilet paper? forget it, just buy enough of it on Amazon to tide you over until mid January. It’s probably cheaper anyway and I don’t have to risk battling crazy New England drivers on the roads that could potentially be icy and snowy to boot.

    I do 99% of my required holiday spending online, with that other 1% usually involving gift certificates to local restaurants or stores that I buy very early in the season to avoid the frothing mouthed masses. Online can’t be beat for time and convienence’s sake and usually prices too.