Reader's EECB Persuades HTC To Actually Open Phone And Check Moisture Sensor

Katherine’s HTC Hero smartphone was only four months old and still under warranty, but the company wouldn’t repair it, claiming that a moisture sensor had been tripped. She knew that she had never dunked the phone, and was determined to fight HTC’s decision. But how? She turned to the Consumerist archives for answers.

I have an HTC Hero smart phone through Sprint and within 4 months the speaker went out and so started my journey to get it repaired through the company as I did not elect the $7/month and $100 refurbished phone option through Sprint.

In frustration I was told after sending in my phone to HTC that a “liquid indicator” was tripped and my phone was not covered under warranty. I did not expose my phone to any liquid so disputed and appealed this assertion. I lived in SW GA where temperatures and humidity reach 115 degrees! Then moved to ND where winter temperatures were 40 below with wind chill.

[The] only options were: They would charge $28 and send it back, or I could pay $300 to get it fixed. I appealed to a manager and was dissatisfied. I tried again and was even more angry with their repeating the disclaimer and saying essentially “so sad, too bad”

I came to Consumerist and saw stories of EECB getting results, so I sent one to everyone on the list at your website. I just wanted to have someone listen and honor the repair.

Thank you. Thank you. Within 24 hours I received a call from a manager who researched the Repair findings on my claim. One indicator WAS tripped but the internal one was not. She authorized my repair and is shipping my phone back overnight. She was kind and courteous and now I am happy. I appreciate your website and the information you provide.

You’re welcome, Katherine! We’re glad that were were able to help you reach someone in power who could talk someone into actually opening up the phone.

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