Sorry, Your 3-Month-Old Starbucks Mug Is Out Of Warranty

Mark has a warning: it’s fine if you want to hand over your money for a venti Java Chip Frappuccino, but don’t buy durable items at Starbucks if you expect them to be, well, durable. He bought a mug back in December, and the mug now has a defect that makes coffee drip on you while you drink. Not liking this feature, he contacted Starbucks and learned that their warranty on mugs lasts only 60 days. “I was shocked that Starbucks would only stand behind their products for 60 days,” Mark writes, “specifically because those same products come at a premium price and sold with overpriced coffee.”

He writes:

I don’t know if I’m just being nit-picky since it’s happening to me, or if this is something that should be a concern.

I purchased a coffee mug from Starbucks in December during the 12 days of deals for approximately $20. It was very handy because it held the via packets in a metal container that also acted as a ‘cuff’ protecting my hand from the heat of the ceramic. Fast forward a few months, and the top on the mug shifts and allows coffee to drip when you hold it at a certain angle (i.e. when you drink it). They no longer offer the mug I purchased at the stores, so I called the customer service number.

I still had the mug and figured I could swap it out for a replacement, but instead the gentleman was quick to offer me a $10 gift card for which I was very appreciative. I thanked him, but asked him if there was any more that can be done since I paid about twice that amount not even 3 months ago. He interrupted me mid-sentence (which may have been accidental), and told me that their products have a 60 day warranty. At that point I was shocked that Starbucks would only stand behind their products for 60 days specifically because those same products come at a premium price and sold with overpriced coffee.

I guess I should be happy that I got a $10 gift card since I was ‘out of warranty’, but it doesn’t seem right. Hopefully this will raise some awareness with consumers and Starbucks so that the policies change. Though I didn’t think I had to worry about warranties when purchasing a coffee mug, in the future I’ll be sure to get my coffee products where I can be sure about the quality (or warranty).

Mark could always try wearing a Slobstopper and continuing to use the Starbucks mug, but replacing the mug is a more cost-effective and less embarrassing option. Perhaps Mark will appreciate suggestions of great non-Starbucks mugs with better durability and longer warranties.