New York & Company Warns Customers Of E-Mail List Breach

Several readers have forwarded us an email from New York & Company warning customers that their email system had been compromised. The company assures subscribers that “only” names and email addresses were accessed, adding that customers might receive spam email as result.

While it is annoying to receive scam emails, the company does remind their customers to be careful when opening third party emails and that New York & Company would never ask for personal information such as social security numbers or credit card information.

One Consumerist reader doesn’t think an apology is enough, writing, “I would have expected them to at least acknowledge the pain points of spam and provide some sort of recompense to their subscribers.”

Read the email below. Do you think New York & Company should be doing more or have they taken all the appropriate steps? Is it still a big deal to have your name and email linked to unwanted parties?

Dear New York & Company Customer,

Yesterday, we were informed by our email service provider that your email address was exposed by unauthorized entry into their system. Our email service provider deploys emails on our behalf to customers who have opted into email based communications from us. We want to assure you that the only information that was obtained was your name and/or email address. Your account and any other personally identifiable information were not at risk.

Please note, it is possible you may receive spam email messages as a result. We want to urge you to be cautious when opening links or attachments from unknown third parties. We also want to remind you that we will never ask you for your personal information in an email.

We sincerely regret this has taken place, and we apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused you. We take your privacy very seriously, and we will continue to work diligently to protect your personal information.

Please visit http://faq.nyandcompany.com for answers to some frequently asked questions about this incident.

Sincerely,

New York & Company