After Jacking My Honeymoon Cost, Expedia Makes Good

Last week we posted a complaint from Shawn, who said his honeymoon was ruined when Expedia sold him a $3,000 all-inclusive trip to Grand Cayman then left him on the hook for an extra $2,160 when it turned out the vacation was about half-inclusive.

Shortly after we posted the story, a PR rep working on behalf of Expedia stepped up. We forwarded her info to Shawn, who wrote yesterday gleeful that the company refunded the extra $2,160.

What’s the most money you ever shamed a company into returning to you?

Previously: Expedia’s Mistakes Nearly Doubled The Cost Of My Honeymoon

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  1. Loias supports harsher punishments against corporations says:

    If I recall, the couple found out about the issue mid-vacation, which very likely caused them to stop utilizing the “all-inclusive” features for fear they would be paying out of pocket, not to mention a lot of grief.

    So I’d say they deserve a partial refund.

    • greggen says:

      I will quickly contact Expedia and let them know about your ‘facts’ and brilliant conclusions so they can give them what they deserve.
      Thanks for sharing Loias.

      • Loias supports harsher punishments against corporations says:

        At least I shared. You just got snarky without actually contributing.

    • Big Mama Pain says:

      I see what you’re thinking; but all inclusive prices are fixed, whether you use amenities it offers or not. It’s fair that they paid the full price for the trip and the overages were refunded.

      • Loias supports harsher punishments against corporations says:

        Yes, but if you’re told no matter what your trip will cost $3,000 and the mid-trip you are told sorry, every is actually going to be charged individually, you would stop using the all-inclusive amenities.

        • ames says:

          That’s assuming they were fully using them to begin with. If I were the company, I’d want some backup – otherwise there’s a precedent set for people to book an all-inclusive, then claim they never used what was offered, and ask for money back.

          The way I understand the original post, they found out a week into it, Expedia agreed to fix it, and then changed their mind on the last day of the vacation. So, there probably wasn’t any real change in the couple’s decisions whether or not to use the included features.

  2. ExtraCelestial says:

    That is one heck of a PR person. I couldn’t make heads or tails of Shawn’s story. For Expedia to step up and take responsibility for something the majority of us couldn’t even decipher is totally above and beyond. The power of The Consumerist?

    • Verucalise (Est.February2008) says:

      I agree, but knowing Expedia’s policies they could have easily said that the OP was in the wrong, with proof. They most likely did breach their contract and the OP had proof. I’m glad these people got their money returned.

    • Dover says:

      Expedia has Shawn’s reservation and contact information as well as (presumably) records of their interactions. I’m sure the PR rep would have been able to piece together the real story (whether or not they actually did, I cannot say).

  3. sonneillon says:

    Sounds like Expedia ricked breach of contract by not living up to their end of the arrangement and tried to back out midway through. Still good thing they came through in the end and not after getting sued.

  4. Oranges w/ Cheese says:

    Glad they got it resolved! The initial letter suggested they had some issues and Expedia told them one thing but then changed their mind. We gotta vote with our $$s so companies know they can’t pull this kind of stuff.

  5. FatLynn says:

    I have heard over and over again that the online travel sites deliberately mislead people into thinking they are getting the all-inclusive package when they are not. I am glad the OP got his money back, but can’t we just put an end to the deceptive practice?

    • George4478 says:

      >>but can’t we just put an end to the deceptive practice?

      I did; I never use those sites to book a vacation. I don’t trust any of them to stand up if something goes wrong.

      • adamstew says:

        Agreed. I’ve always booked directly with the hotels any time I can. In most cases the travel sites won’t even save you much money. And then the hotel and the travel site can’t point fingers at each other with the only person to lose being the customer.

        That’s not to say that you won’t get burned, but it does remove a very convenient, and hard to overcome, excuse… “Well, it’s not our fault expedia told you that this was included.”…”Well, it’s not our fault the hotel told us it was.”

  6. It'sRexManningDay! says:

    I understand going it alone if you’re just booking a quickie trip someplace domestically, but when you’re planning a major vacation, such as a honeymoon, why are people so averse to using a living, breathing, honest-to-goodness travel agent? They generally can get as good or better deals than the online sites, and they often can offer other perks you might not even have thought to ask for if you’re using a website.

    We booked our honeymoon thru an agent after trying to decipher the fine print at a number of online sites. The agent got us a better vacation for less money, but even if it had cost a bit more, I’d have stil been happy since she demystified so much of the travel arrangements for us on our first big trip overseas.

    • kennedar says:

      I agree. Your honeymoon is the one vacation you do not want to have messed up. And in all the stress of the pre-wedding days, no one has time to call and triple check that everything is ok. This is why we used a travel agent for ours. When swine flu hit Mexico and our flights were cancelled, we were very happy that we had a travel agent who could just take care of everything!

      • Jevia says:

        Well, for one thing, finding a good travel agent is not easy. Frankly, I don’t know anyone who has used one, everyone I know uses the internet to book flights, rental car, hotels, etc. Every time I’ve asked people for a travel agent reference, I get shrugs, blank stares and “I don’t know anyone, we use the computer.”

        Three times, I’ve played the travel agent roulette, just picking one who’s office I’ve seen close to home or my work. None of those were good experiences, either with bad information or no information, and certainly little actual help in doing anything that I couldn’t have done just as easily on my own.

        The only time I’ve ever had a good travel agent experience was one time using the agent supplied by my work (and then she left the office and I have no idea where she went to try and find her again).

        So how does one find one of these rare “good” travel agents if no one else is using a travel agent?

      • Jevia says:

        Well, for one thing, finding a good travel agent is not easy. Frankly, I don’t know anyone who has used one, everyone I know uses the internet to book flights, rental car, hotels, etc. Every time I’ve asked people for a travel agent reference, I get shrugs, blank stares and “I don’t know anyone, we use the computer.”

        Three times, I’ve played the travel agent roulette, just picking one who’s office I’ve seen close to home or my work. None of those were good experiences, either with bad information or no information, and certainly little actual help in doing anything that I couldn’t have done just as easily on my own.

        The only time I’ve ever had a good travel agent experience was one time using the agent supplied by my work (and then she left the office and I have no idea where she went to try and find her again).

        So how does one find one of these rare “good” travel agents if no one else is using a travel agent?

      • Dinhilion says:

        They are all gone. My parents were travel agents for years and are now out of the business. It is just not a cost effective service anymore.

  7. ThunderRoad says:

    Amazing how these companies suddenly “do the right thing” when there’s a little negative press out there….

    • Loias supports harsher punishments against corporations says:

      I think that’s the new corporate policy being pitched by PR firms right now.

      “Do nothing unless Twitter says it’s wrong.”

      • LadySiren is murdering her kids with HFCS and processed cheese says:

        Um, so you work for a PR firm, do you? Well, I do. And no, only the bad PR firms spout such nonsense. Our firm strongly advises clients to be proactive and up front about their mistakes, and resolve them ASAP. “Daylight burial” is always a good policy.

        Also: comment FAIL today. Consumerist needs more donations?

    • dg says:

      It’s too bad that it takes the negative publicity to get it done…

    • common_sense84 says:

      The question is will all inclusive mean all inclusive, or did expedia just credit people this one time.

      There is little detail over what was purchased.

  8. Happy13178 says:

    Yeah, that’s great Expedia, but I still won’t be using your service. Do I really want to risk the same nonsense if I’m on vacation? You might as well have kept the $2000+ to offset the business you’re going to lose from allowing this to get to the public shaming stage.

  9. kyramidx3 says:

    Hello – Long time reader, first time commenter. This story is actually about my brother and sister-in-law…unfortunately the initial post had A LOT cut out of the story. I just wanted to post the full story to try and resolve some confusion:

    It can be found at : http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/5660930/expedia_will_only_fool_me_once.html?cat=16