Quality Van Lines Responds To Complaint

Earlier this week we posted about Cory, a man who had a bad experience with the moving company he hired to schlep his belongings from New York to North Carolina. Now Quality Van Lines has responded with their side of the story.

This was left as a comment on the original post yesterday afternoon.

This is a response from Quality Van Line Management directly. First and foremost we last spoke to Cori about a week ago, and he was making an outrageous demand for money and threatened us by saying that if we do not pay him what he wants he will immediately try to ruin our business reputation and start making us look as bad as he can on the internet. If we were to give him the money, he would be happy with the service and the situation would be over. Obviously, we did not.

Regarding the facts, the job was picked up on July 31, 2008 and delivered on August 8, 2008. Within contracts Cori and Ali signed and were well aware of, we had 7-14 BUSINESS days to deliver the furniture, it arrived in 5 BUSINESS days, which is in fact an early delivery. After delivery Cori came to us with complaints of damages. By law we have a claim department that handles these issues and we give a valuation with signing up with our company of $0.60 per lb per article. Before signing up with us you are more than welcome to buy additional insurance, Cori chose not to do that. Therefore, he went to the claims department for damages and recieved an offer of $288.00 for reimbursement. He was not happy with this and refused, he called us back and said he wanted $800.00 back for his inconvienences, stress, and lack of professionalism in his opinion. He did understand the reasons the quote went up and had no problem paying for that, it was just his stress upon delivery he decided $288.00 would not be enough. We offered to make it $350.00 just to satisfy his demands, and he declined once again and told us in these exact words, “Your company will be sorry”.

We have all legal documents of Cori and Ali complying to the terms of the move, and understanding the contracts. This complaint is coming directly out of spite because a customer is not getting what they wants, it is our job to make sure every customer gets everything they deserved by the law and the terms of moving policy.

Read the original post and ensuing comments here.

Comments

Edit Your Comment

  1. georgi55 says:

    Holy crap…a company that actually “cares” about their reputation…what has happened to this country?

  2. Shark1998 says:

    That sounds reasonable enough!

  3. JBlair42081 says:

    nice to see a logical response to a story which doesn’t include ‘taking it seriously’. If the consumer knew of the amount of insurance and neglected or declined additional coverage what can he expect? If I crash my car tomorrow I know my insurance company will only pay out the value of the car as they determine it. This is why I paid for gap insurance which would pay off any remaining balance of my car loan. Accidents happen and everyone is human. If the damage was so little it makes me think the moving company was not grossly negligent with the consumers belongings (unlike the one who tried to go under an overpass and failed) so I am putting the blame on no one and scolding the consumer for making this web site a means of trying to gain unjust retribution.

    • @JBlair42081: Just remember that the company’s written promises conflict with what Cory says he was told over the phone repeatedly. It’s a good lesson for others: make sure what you’re being promised matches what you’re legally agreeing to.

      • @Chris Walters: I had a client with a similar problem (although much more nefarious on the part of the company), being told one thing over the phone but the company kept refusing to provide it in writing. He was fairly low literacy; they kept assuring him it was in the contract and refusing to clarify further. His boxes arrived looking liked the company had KICKED them across the three states, were left out in the rain (totally open to the sky, since they were 3/4 destroyed), and with his birth certificate and other ID-theft-relevant documents gone — as were a huge number of high-dollar collectible albums and concert T-shirts.

        He had actually paid the $200 for the supplemental insurance; he had the CC statement to prove it; but he’d never gotten a contract from the company for the insurance, so they wanted to pay him 60 cents/pound for loss and damages.

        I handed the case off when it was removed to federal court, but he was looking to bring criminal charges against whoever stole his shit, and was suing for something in excess of $80,000 (a big chunk was damages for enabling ID theft, under a fairly clever theory relying on some new state law).

        The moral of the story is: GET IT IN WRITING. And don’t ship your birth certificate.

    • NYGal81 says:

      @JBlair42081: I don’t think it’s that it the damage was insignificant–it sounds like their stuff was trashed–but the damage insurance gets paid out at a price-per-pound or price-per-foot rate–NOT at the actual value of the damaged goods. If the guy signed the contract for the stated rate of insurance, he really has no recompense if he’s not satisfied with the payout.

      Using a moving company is one time where it may actually be very wise to spring for additional insurance coverage of your belongings. Moving is also one of those times where it might be worth the extra cost of going with a known moving service. It’s expensive as hell–we packed our own boxes and paid $600 to be moved 12 miles!!!–but it was a worth-while expense to know that our stuff was going to be loaded properly (we watched the whole time) and transported (presumably…) safely.

  4. Pylon83 says:

    Wow. That’s not exactly a glowing testament to the competency of the company. First, it’s full of grammatical errors. I hate it when a company can’t even take the time to make sure that statements that it publishes are even remotely intelligible. Second, I like how there is absolutely NO mention of customer satisfaction, etc. The customer is not owed a good experience, only what is required by law. While I do happen to agree with that (one cannot expect more than what the law requires), but one can certainly choose only to businesses with companies that do indeed go above and beyond only what the law requires. It doesn’t seem like a good marketing strategy to advertise that “We do what the law requires and nothing more!”. That aside, I’m also amused by the companies seemingly solid belief that since the contract says x, that’s what a judge would enforce. While I haven’t researched it, I have a hard time believing that one couldn’t make a somewhat persuasive argument that $.60/lb per item isn’t unconscionable. I’m also bothered when companies choose to engage in wars with the customers like this. In my opinion, a short response that just says “the contract said X, we did X” or no response would have been more appropriate. I feel like a response that essentially attacks the customer does nothing but make them look bad. I do somewhat agree that the customer isn’t owed anything more than the actual damage that occurred. Compensation for “stress”, etc. is complete BS.

    • chrisdag says:

      @Pylon83: The last time I moved (intra-city) the contract had a very special big/bold box regarding insurance and it clearly stated the $.60/lb valuation for damages. Both the sales person and the moving people went out of their way to highlight that area and make sure I initialed it. The contract also had really clear information about what to do if you wanted additional insurance for replacement-value.

      While .60 is really low it is not something that is hidden in the fine print (I’d call it unconscionable only if it was a hidden gotcha…). Because of issues like this the moving companies generally make people specifically recognize and sign off on this provision.

    • Steeb2er says:

      @Pylon83: They DID offer to go “above and beyond” by offering $350 for the damaged goods. Sure, it’s a long way from the $800 Cory asked for, but they’re sticking within the lines of the contract. Isn’t that the entire purpose of having a contract in the first place?

      Would you make the same statement about Amazon? “It’s not a glowing statement to the competency of Amazon that they ONLY sent the item you paid for, and shipped it in the manner you specified.”

    • Bakkster_Man says:

      @Pylon83: On the other hand, as we know from reading the Consumerist, the worst way to get what you want from a company is by making ridiculous threats. This seems to imply that the consumer did just that. Why would a company do more than they had to for a guy who (allegedly) flips out and makes threats?

      Sure, it would be nice if every company went above and beyond. I think it’s perfectly reasonable for a company to not give into a consumer demanding they give more than was signed for in the contract, and to protect themselves from what could be considered Libel, if the OP did, in fact, lie to make their company look worse.

    • agnamus says:

      @Pylon83: People who have no clue what they’re talking about shouldn’t toss out their two-cents on what judges will and will not enforce. I hate to break it to you, but the van line’s attorney(s) drew up this contract. Being that, you know, those people are actually lawyers and you’re obviously not, I’m sure they’re right and you’re wrong. Seriously.

    • baristabrawl says:

      @Pylon83: I understood it just fine. It was remotely intelligible.

  5. Klaus_Kinsky says:

    This complaint is coming directly out of spite because a customer is not getting what they wants, it is our job to make sure every customer gets everything they deserved by the law and the terms of moving policy.”

    If the customer isn’t getting “what they wants,” because the company is hiding behind their interpretation of contract language, I think future customers would like to know this so they can stay away. This kind of crap happens all the time and its nice to know the kind of company you are dealing with before something crappy like this happens.

    • Synth3t1c says:

      @Klaus_Kinsky: I don’t think the customer is owed more than the $0.60/lb simply because they DO offer insurance. It remind me of when I worked in retail customers coming in after 1.5 years with a laptop that had broken somehow and expect us to fix/replace it, when the service plan would have covered it. I’m not saying all or even most of the time service plans/insurance are good purchases, I’m just saying they DO fulfill a niche in the market that many customers turn down, and some regret it in the long run.

    • harlock_JDS says:

      @Klaus_Kinsky: they aren’t hieing behind the contract language, they are honoring the contract. Why bother having a contract if you aren’t going to follow it?

  6. Synth3t1c says:

    I believe Cory is taking advantage of this website in order to further his own financial gain. The company coming here and revealing the other side of the story really is an eye opener; I would not be stopped from using these people any more.

    • supertechman-protests disemvoweling by disemvoweling himself says:

      @Synth3t1c: Do you have any evidence to support your view that the OP is attempting to “further his own financial gain”, or do you simply believe anything a company says is true.

      It’s true that there are always two sides of a story, but if both sides have opposing stories, they can’t both be correct.

      What exactly makes you side with the company?

  7. hills says:

    While the letter makes some good points, it doesn’t address their raising of the estimate by 50% on the day of the move, nor does it address the packing items Cory was charged for but didn’t receive (tv box, etc….. ).
    Also, it really does take a pro to pack items well – anyone can haul the crap outside and toss it in the truck, but hiring 2 guys off the street in the morning is not professional at all.

    • Synth3t1c says:

      @hillsrovey: do you think that any of cory’s story can be a blatant lie?

      • Ms. Pants says:

        @Synth3t1c: It’s possible, surely. I’d prefer to not believe anyone is a blatant liar from the get-go.

        It’s true that the comment doesn’t address the verbal promises/changes but most likely, the person writing the comment wasn’t a witness to those verbal exchanges, so it would be difficult to comment on such a manner.

        I think this is simply a lose-lose here. *sigh*

    • onesong says:

      @hillsrovey: it bothered me, too, that these issues weren’t addressed. a simple, “cory’s claims regarding blah blah blah are entirely false,” would have done it. i think it’s suspect that this company is not answering the claims directly.

  8. PinkBox says:

    This letter only guarantees that I will NEVER use Quality Van Line Management to move my belongings.

    Very unprofessional response (come on – responding in a post to a blog forum?), and little regard for the customer having his belongings destroyed.

    The letter didn’t address the fact that Cory had to pay for supplies they did not use, why they used guys off the street instead of hired professionals, that they badly packed the belongings AND smashed into Cory’s car.

    I understand that people should pay for the insurance, but even with it not paid I’d expect a company to still ATTEMPT to do a fairly decent job when hired to do so.

    Btw, Consumerist… when I try to look at the extended replies, it takes me to a new page that says “true”. Just thought I’d let you know.

  9. mir777 says:

    Interesting that a company does take the time to read Consumerist!

  10. Pinkbox wrote:

    “Very unprofessional response (come on – responding in a post to a blog forum?)”

    I can’t disagree more. I think it is an extremely professional for them to come and post.

    Exactly where else are they supposed to tell thier side of the story?

    Whether you would do business with this company or not is up to you–but I for one would like to see more companies reply to postings on Consumerist so we can get a better view of what happened.

    • NYGal81 says:

      @CreativeLinks: Agreed. Even though this is a forum tailored to consumers, doesn’t the company have the right to address complaints being made against them?

      Probably the most frustrating thing about the consumer-company interface is that everything is based on perceptions, and very rarely will the perception of the consumer and the perception of the company align. It leaves us wondering what “really” happened–if we assume that the truth of the matter is somewhere in between–but you can sure get a feel for a lot by the language and care used in the complaints and responses.

    • PinkBox says:

      @CreativeLinks: I personally think a professional response would have been dealing with the customer directly, or writing to the Consumerist themselves to resolve any problems.

      Also, I find the letter itself very unprofessional. It is full of grammatical errors that didn’t attempt to explain many of the matters Cory complained about.

      • mmmsoap says:

        @NYGal81: While I appreciate that the company responded at all, the initial response (word for word) came in the form of a comment to the OP’s (Cory’s) article, where there is little we can do to verify the information they give, or that they are who they say they are. This is not professional behavior, it seems more like whining.

        (I assume that Chris has since verified that the moving company is the one who made the comment, since it got it’s own article.)

        That being said, it sounds like there are definitely two sides to the story. Frequently OP’s think they’re cool as cucumbers, when a more impartial observer would characterize their behavior as “flipping their sh*t”. On the other hand, the moving company’s comment doesn’t really address many of the complaints initially reported by the OP, including non-official (and thus non-insured) employees being hired, damage to his car, and being (over)charged for packing materials. If the OP was totally off base, I’d expect a thorough response to each item, not just an explanation about the difference between “days” and “business days”.

  11. sleze69 says:

    What about the car damage?

  12. JustThatGuy3 says:

    “Within contracts Cori and Ali signed and were well aware of, we had 7-14 BUSINESS days to deliver the furniture,”

    It would be great if they could post an (appropriately redacted) contract showing that they did sign off on this provision.

    It certainly seems at least _possible_ that the real story here is the Cori was, in essence, trying to blackmail the company into giving him more money. If so, Consumerist should pull the original story from the site entirely, to ensure that it doesn’t end up as a Google hit for the company.

  13. PinkBox says:

    @PinkBox: Ack! I’m wrong – he asked for $800. I wonder if that quote included car damages?

    • PinkBox says:

      @SkokieGuy: That is the same way I’m looking at the story. There are too many questions left unanswered, and in my own opinion, the company’s response really isn’t addressing these issues.

  14. SkokieGuy says:

    Based on the original post, Cory claimed:

    The company raised the fee by 50% on the day of the move;
    Cory was charged for special packing supplies that weren’t provided;
    two of the movers were guys hired that morning off the street;
    the agent who worked with the couple to set up the move stopped returning calls, then went on vacation;
    the van was late to Chapel Hill by 5 days;
    the van’s driver smashed into Cory’s car and damaged it;
    the items arrived badly packed and damaged.

    These items weren’t addressed in the moving company’s response. The indication of his claim for $800.00 seems rather low if the moving quote doubled, his car was damaged, etc.

    Something is not adding up and we are not hearing the full story.

    • Shadowman615 says:

      @SkokieGuy: I just looked back on the initial complaint and was wondering the same thing. Why didn’t this moving company respond to any of these complaints?

  15. PinkBox says:

    Is anyone else having issues with their replies? Two of mine have shown up in the wrong place, and I was careful with the second one to try and make sure I didn’t make a mistake.

  16. revmatty says:

    @PinkBox: I’m using FF3 and if I click on a thread I simply get a plain page with the text ‘True’ in the upper left corner (yes, I know this is the return of an eval function but I’m trying to make this plain for non-technical people to understand as well). There is something wrong with the comment threading feature.

  17. cwicseolfor says:

    I’m hardly an unbiassed subject — I know Cory (not Cori — the least they can do is remember how to write his name) personally from college. But to respond to the comments that attack his character as using the website to unfairly gain profit — that’s about as far from the truth as possible. I asked him to write his experience on Consumerist (though he might have mulled the idea around in his head before my mention) because this is the best place to get a lot of eyes to look at the issue. Cory isn’t the type to try and blackmail a company by threatening their image to the online community. But he’s not the type to ignore such blatant ignorances of anything resembling “quality”.

  18. grouse says:

    This doesn’t say anything about the car they damaged, among many other things. Frankly, I think it is a whitewash.

  19. KerriNiger says:

    I have to agree with this comment. It’s OK to hire people off the street to haul packed boxes, but not to pack the boxes.

    In addition, if the moving company did not choose to come to the location to view it before giving their estimate, but rather chose to give an estimate over the phone, then the company should be bound by the estimate unless it’s clear that the customer deliberately lied.

    I moved from California to upstate NY some years ago. The moving company did the estimate over the phone, at their choice. They asked “how many beds? how many chairs? etc.” and gave me a figure. I kept saying “Are you SURE? I have LOTS of books.”

    They honored their estimate, even though my belongings went over. Cory should not have agreed to those charges, but I understand why he did because moving is stressful, and I’m sure he felt he couldn’t really cancel and start all over at that point.

    I’m glad the company responded — but I wouldn’t use that company or recommend it to others.

  20. zerj says:

    Well I think its the problem of pushing the insurance costs onto the end user that is the real issue. That kind of cost really should be covered by the movers. How does a customer know what to insure for? How do they know QualityVanLines won’t just hire 2 guys off the street to dump your boxes onto the truck? Only Quality has this kind of control so should be responsible for buying the insurance policy.

    $0.60/lb is pretty darn low anyway. So your saying if you broke a $5000 plasma TV in moving you would pay out about $10 bucks?

    • georgi55 says:

      @zerj: Your $5000 plasma wights 16 pounds?

      • Trick says:

        @georgi55:

        We have a 73″ Mitsubishi DLP HDTV that cost over $7000 in 2006 (we got it for $1700 thanks to a relative giving us a heads up on a once-a-year sale) and it weighs about 188lbs. (feels much lighter) so I guess we would only get about $112!

  21. Ron Draper says:

    I am never impressed when a company responds by blaming the customer. Not only did he have a poor customer service experience, he is now having a horrible customer service response. Oh, Quality, you just lost another customer, and his name is me.

  22. humphrmi says:

    It seems to me, having read Cory’s original complaint, and their response, that Quality Van Lines thinks this website is a ratings-type website.

    Poorly written responses that don’t address all the complaints may fly on those sites, but readers here have a clue (and an opinion).

    Nice try, Quality. Peddle your story elsewhere.

  23. Ms. Pants says:

    I’d love to hear from Cori/y again to see if Quality Van Lines actually responded to him personally before posting the comment. I do hope that’s the case.

    • Rhayader says:

      @Ms. Pants: No, they did not personally respond to me in any way (and still have not). I sent them a personal email notifying them of the original story on Consumerist a few days ago, and invited them to respond personally.

      By the way, my full story in the original post is almost exactly the email I sent to Quality directly, long before I reported the incident to anybody.

      • Ms. Pants says:

        @Rhayader: Ugh. That’s incredibly disheartening. And not especially business savvy in my opinion.

        To me, it comes off as rather childish to only respond once your story had gone public on Consumerist, and then to only respond publicly on the site.

        I am officially in the anti-Quality Van Lines category now.

  24. mrsultana can't get a password to work says:

    Um, if the article is blaming the OP, is it allowed to blame the OP in the comments?

    • @mrsultana: Whoa there, we’re not taking Quality’s side in this story. Just posting their response. In my opinion, this is of the “give them enough rope to hang themselves” variety. As several eagle-eyed readers have pointed out, Quality did not address most of the things Cory has mentioned.

  25. Ms. Pants says:

    Oh– PS so the people with issues with expanding comments and getting the javascript “True” page thing coming up….

    When you open the comments, just hit “expand all” at the top. It’s not a permanent fix, but it works for now.

  26. quackwhack says:

    The company says a lot when it dodges the worst parts of the complaint – that the quality of service provided was grossly inadequate, as was hitting Cory’s car, and being charged for workers off the street.

    Further, a spell-check and grammar check when writing on behalf of the company goes a long way. I definitely think less of Quality Moving that they wrote a hasty response riddled with grammatical errors. If they planned on using the comments section as their forum, at least take the time to make it look professional. Or better yet, formulate a real response, and e-mail it to the consumerist itself.

  27. kaitlind says:

    CONSUMERIST!!! ask them about the stuff they ignored!

  28. CountryJustice says:

    Based on Cory’s experience, I doubt I’d ever use Quality Van Lines to move, but at the same time, I’m the kind of person who’s more likely to rent a Penske and do it myself anyway.

    That said, QVL’s reply doesn’t seem unreasonable at all to me. Their choice of words, as far as providing the amount of service required by law is concerned, was a bit poor; instead I think it would’ve been a better choice of words to indicate that Cory received exactly what he agreed to and paid for, merits of value notwithstanding. What surprises me is that the charges that could probably be best disputed–such as TV crates and mattress bags–seemed to be the least pursued.

    Lack of foresight and failure to carefully read the terms of your agreement does not make for justified refund-extortion.

  29. Rhayader says:

    Hey everyone, Cory here. Reading these comments, I feel like I should make a few clarifications.

    1) I never “threatened” the company in any way (I never used the words they attribute to me in their reply). I had several discussions (obviously) with Quality, and once it was clear that they were not going to stick to their word, I pursued all of the avenues (Better Business Bureau, movingscams.org, Consumerist) that were at my disposal, just like many consumers who feel they have been treated badly.

    2) I am not looking for a free ride here. I understand the complexities involved with running a business like that, and I don’t expect perfection. I just feel that the treatment I received was improper and unprofessional, and that the experience entitled me to a refund which would result in my paying (in full) the original amount quoted. Quality has no legal obligation to agree with me, and given their service up to this point, I don’t expect them to acquiesce out of a desire to do ethical business.

    3) Most importantly, my complaint with Quality is not relating to damaged property or delayed delivery. It is a failure on their part to properly manage our expectations and to communicate with us during the process. There were obvious attempts to deceive us in order to get our business, and then a reluctance to update us or to help us out in any way once they had our things (and our money). I am more displeased with the process as a whole than I am with any one aspect of the experience.

    Anyway, thanks to everyone for giving us your thoughts, and to Consumerist for telling our story.

    • Pylon83 says:

      @Rhayader:
      So you think you are owed extra money simply because they made you mad and didn’t provide exemplary customer service? I can back you up 100% on the desire to get 100% of the damage they caused, but I think it’s totally wrong to make demands above and beyond that. If they truly were late, that’s one thing, but you get no compensation for “stress” or any other non-material BS.

      • Rhayader says:

        @Pylon83: I am not making “demands”, and at this point I don’t expect to get any more money back. Moe had told me several times that he was aware of the problems we experienced, and he wanted to make it right. Then, when it came time to actually discuss the numbers, he basically balked.

        Again, I am not looking to scam anyone here, and my claim is not that I was legally entitled to a stress-free move. I simply felt that we were mistreated by this company and that other people should be aware of their shoddy service.

  30. The response doesn’t address the fact the driver backed into the customer’s car.

  31. InezEuropa says:

    This is crazy, I used to work as additional labor for my father who works for United Van Lines. We had our fair share of crazy people who wanted to claim every little thing, even though everything we did for a shipment made sure the belongings were in pristine condition when we loaded it and unloaded it at the new home.

    I can see where Cori is coming from and where the Company is coming from, but really I still wouldn’t use a company called Quality Van Lines, Allied, Mayflower, United Van Lines, stick with those and you should be ok.

  32. bobert says:

    I went back and re-read Cory’s original post.

    If you like…
    – Having your car demolished
    – Getting charged extra for special packing materials that aren’t provided
    – Bait-and-switch pricing
    – Getting a four-day delivery estimate, and then having the move take twice as long
    – Having the company pat themselves on the back because they only delivered four days later than the estimate, instead of the sixteen days their contract gives them (14 business days is roughly 20 calendar days)
    – Having someone say they can’t deliver your stuff because they lost the keys
    – Having someone say they can’t deliver your stuff because they lost the delivery address
    – Trying to find out where your stuff is, and having people be rude, not call back as promised, have no idea when you’ll get it, and be suddenly unavailable when you call

    Hey, I’m down with that! Go get your move done by these “Quality” folks who provide a “logical” response and “reveal… the other side of the story.”

  33. Jimbo says:

    This a bunch of BS from the movers. All the company does is pass the buck to the “claims dept.” How many times has the “claims dept” helped you? What the guy writes might sound good on paper but it is the consumer who has to do all the legwork and fighting for what is owed. Their reply resolves nothing.

  34. airos4 says:

    I find it interesting that the tone of the respondent is not apologetic nor does he accept any of the blame whatsoever. Instead, he’s picking on the things that he can, and ignoring the rest.

    So, we acknowledge that the optional insurance would have been a good idea. And they fulfilled their contractual agreements regarding the date of delivery.

    Where’s the retribution for the damage to the car? Where’s an apology for poor customer service when answering the phone and providing status updates?
    Where’s an apology for having made them sit and wait not once, but multiple days for the delivery that was promised earlier THAT DAY and then missed?

    I just used Metro Movers, who are also in Clifton. I had a great experience with them (albeit it was a short-distance move). They used thick pads for everything as arranged, packed everything into the truck carefully so it wouldn’t shift, and although they ran late on the way to the pickup – they CALLED and gave an explanation of what happened, and exactly when they would arrive.

  35. shy31002 says:

    This is Ali (of “Cory and Ali,” one of the involved parties).

    First of all, I’m happy to see that Consumerist posted the response from Quality Van Lines. By all means, they should have the chance to tell their side of the story as well. This website serves as a balanced public forum for concerned consumers, and that factored heavily into our decision to recount, in such a public way, the unfortunate experience we had with this moving company. We simply hoped to get the word out to others that we would never use this company or recommend them to our friends (or our enemies…)!

    With this in mind, the response from QVL made it sound as though we’ve tried to blackmail them. This could not be further from the truth. While we did approach them after the ordeal was said and done with a request for a partial refund (about $800 because it would bring us back to the amount originally quoted and agreed upon), we in no way expect to see any of that back now as a result of this post. From their response, it is clear that they consider our satisfaction with the move as PURELY motivated by money; again, this is far from the truth. It is not as if they would give us back $800 and we would recommend them to everyone we know. The $800 seemed to us like a fair request given the numerous complaints Cory already established in his initial post. Bottom line, Quality Van Lines does not care about being fair or about the satisfaction of their customers; they cared only about getting our money. We hope that by knowing that upfront, you will choose not to give them your money for your own sake!

    In numerous conversations I had with Alan prior to moving day, he told me that our belongings could and WOULD be delivered within a matter of 3 days, as they “had trucks going down to Florida every weekend.” In fact, I emphasized my enthusiasm for using his company because of this fact. He agreed and emailed a quote, the contents of which DID NOT STATE ANYTHING ABOUT 7 – 14 DAYS. The only place this *may* have been stated, and I would have to go back and look to be sure, was on the contract that was given to me to sign ONLY after everything had been loaded on the to truck. There was no turning back at that point, as we had to vacate our apartment on that day. The first VERBAL notification I received that our expectations would not be met was when I FINALLY got a hold of Alan en route to North Carolina the next day. I inquired about when to expect the delivery over the weekend and Alan said it wouldn’t be coming over the weekend and then FLAT OUT LIED to me on the phone, saying that he had NEVER said it would be there over the weekend. Again, water under the bridge and an experience we’ve now learned from. Most of the people we dealt with at Quality Van Lines repeatedly lied to us; I was naïve. I will assume from now on that more people are lying to me and do not want to satisfy their customers or uphold their word.

    As for the damage to Cory’s car, it was handled through a separate insurance claim and has been taken care of at this point. That said, it was a huge inconvenience for us as it happened two days before Cory was due to start his new job and definitely put added strain onto our attempts to “get settled in” before our daily obligations began.

    If you want to use Quality Van Lines, go right ahead. But, we are giving our wholehearted recommendation that you do not make the same mistakes that we did!! The experience of dealing with them was a nightmare for us. Do yourself a favor, and use a company that still cares about their customers!

  36. Smashville says:

    “We have all legal documents of Cori and Ali complying to the terms of the move, and understanding the contracts. This complaint is coming directly out of spite because a customer is not getting what they wants, it is our job to make sure every customer gets everything they deserved by the law and the terms of moving policy.”

    What part of the contract allows you to hit their car and charge for services not provided?

    Also, you say “a customer is not getting what they wants”, which is a) bad grammar and b) horrible business practice. The customer isn’t getting what they want…maybe that should be a giant hint to those reading that Quality Van Lines does not care about customer service. Customer satisfaction is not something Quality Van Lines can provide, nor do they want to, as they directly state in their letter.

  37. greggen says:

    I am confused why some people think OP is asking for more than he is owed, and blasting him for being upset for the damage done. The packing materials that were ordered and NOT provided would have provided some protection. If a company is negligent in doing its job, not buying additional insurance is not a ‘get out of jail’ card for the moving company. They need to be responsible for the damage they did.

  38. bobhope2112 says:

    With the exception of time of delivery, they didn’t deny any of the OP’s allegations.

  39. SteveZim1017 says:

    I never understand how a moving company can make a contract that says “we’ll move your stuff, but if we are negligent and destroy it we will only pay you for a small portion of what we broke. However if you want us to move it and be sure your stuff is safe, pay us more.”

    If your job is to safely move things then damaging them is negligence and you should have to pay for its value! how do they get away with this 60 cents per pound crap?

  40. raskolnik says:

    The contract is all well and good, but if they were negligent (which it definitely sounds like they were) and perhaps even trying to defraud someone, there’s no way the contract can be enforced on its face.

    I have a hard time taking the company’s argument seriously when they a) didn’t address several of the claims made, b) choose to get into a verbal battle with a customer on an internet forum, and c) can’t even find someone who writes proper English.

    So either it’s a troll impersonating the company or they fail at operating a business. My advice to the consumer would be to take them to small claims court, take the contract and as much evidence as possible, and let the judge sort things out.

  41. Jevia says:

    I too hate the ‘bait and switch’ on the price ‘estimate’ then get charged more on the day of the move, when your back is up against the wall and you have no choice but to “agree” with their price raise, or scramble to try and find another moving company in a short period of time. Based on past experience, its virtually impossible to arrange for (reputable) movers with less than a week’s notice, so if you have to get out of your home within a certain time frame, you have no choice but to take the price given.

    People generally don’t move till they have to, give or take a few days. So if something goes wrong with your movers on your scheduled day, you can be up a creek.

    I’m so sure that the OP “agreed” to the price increase. Likely he had no choice, he could “agree” or not get his stuff moved when he had to, because he would not have been able to make new arrangements in time.

    • Rhayader says:

      @Jevia: Yeah, it seems to me that this is what they hang their hats on. They know moving is a time-sensitive venture, and that if they low-ball you on the initial estimate you won’t be able to say anything on pick-up day.

      They raised the price by $800 on us, but we really had no choice; it probably would have cost us even more to scramble and find alternate arrangements at the last second.

  42. lalawgirl says:

    There are always two sides to every story. My general motto is, however, always that you can never buy too much insurance. period.

  43. shy31002 says:

    This is Ali (of “Cory and Ali,” one of the involved parties).

    First of all, I’m happy to see that Consumerist posted the response from Quality Van Lines. By all means, they should have the chance to tell their side of the story as well. This website serves as a balanced public forum for concerned consumers, and that factored heavily into our decision to recount the unfortunate experience we had with this moving company in such a public way. We simply hoped to get the word out to others that we would never use this company or recommend them to our friends (or our enemies…)

    With this in mind, the response from QVL made it sound as though we’ve tried to blackmail them. This could not be further from the truth. While we did approach them after the ordeal was said and done with a request for a partial refund (about $800 because it would bring us back to the amount originally quoted and agreed upon), we in no way expect to see any of that back now as a result of this post. From their response, it is clear that they consider our satisfaction with the move as PURELY motivated by money; again, this is far from the truth. It is not as if they would give us back $800 and so then we would recommend them to everyone we know. The $800 seemed to us like a fair request given the numerous complaints Cory already established in his initial post. Bottom line, Quality Van Lines does not care about being fair or about the satisfaction of their customers; they cared only about getting our money. We hope that by knowing that upfront, you will choose not to give them your money for your own sake!

    In numerous conversations I had with Alan prior to moving day, he told me that our belongings could and WOULD be delivered within a matter of 3 days, as they “had trucks going down to Florida every weekend.” In fact, I emphasized my enthusiasm for using his company because of this fact. He agreed and emailed a quote, the contents of which DID NOT STATE ANYTHING ABOUT 7 – 14 DAYS. The only place this *may* have been stated, and I would have to go back and look to be sure, was on the contract that was given to me ONLY after everything had been loaded on the to truck. There was no turning back at that point, as we had to vacate our apartment on that day. The first VERBAL notification I received that our expectations would not be met was when I FINALLY got a hold of Alan en route to North Carolina the next day. I inquired about when to expect the delivery over the weekend and Alan said it wouldn’t be coming over the weekend and then FLAT OUT LIED to me on the phone, saying that he had NEVER said it would be there over the weekend. Again, water under the bridge and an experience we’ve now learned from. Most of the people we dealt with at Quality Van Lines repeatedly lied to us; I was naïve . I will assume from now on that more people are lying to me and do not want to satisfy their customers.

    As for the damage to Cory’s car, it was handled through a separate insurance claim and has been taken care of at this point. That said, it was a huge inconvenience for us as it happened two days before Cory was due to start his new job and definitely put added strain onto our attempts to “get settled in” before our daily obligations began.

    If you want to use Quality Van Lines, go right ahead. But, we are giving our wholehearted recommendation that you do not make the same mistakes that we did!! Use a company that still cares about their customers, and not just about getting their customer’s money!

  44. trashbaby says:

    The OP should check if their renter’s/homeowner’s insurance has coverage for items damaged in a move. Many dwelling policies have a 10% coverage of the value of the policy. I understand wanting the company to take ownership of the issue, but at the same time if it is a financial impact to the OP, I hope he checks with his insurance company.

  45. wellfleet says:

    Moving insurance is just like luggage insurance when you fly. You are welcome to buy more insurance if you want, but the company will only cover up to X amount without charging you more. I have never NOT seen this on a contract, and I always pay extra because I’m paranoid and have expensive crap.

    That said, I’m sure that somewhere between the OP and the van line’s story, there’s some truth.

    I believe that the OP should be compensated for their damaged stuff, only up to the amount in the contract, and a little more for the sheer irritation. However, as a manager at BBY, I have had customers attempt to blackmail me by mentioning the Consumerist/AG/BBB etc. I’m not sure where the line is between making the customer happy and bending to unreasonable demands. It’s often quite blurry. Plus, I don’t really *love* being threatened.

    It seems to me that the litigious nature of many Americans leads them to believe that the gentlest breeze is cause for compensation.

    • Rhayader says:

      @wellfleet: I guess I will say this one more time: we did not “threaten” QVL in any way. The words they attribute to me in their reply were never used. I simply told them that I was displeased with the entire experience, and that if they would not reconsider trying to make it right, I would not be left with anything good to say about their company. They had ample time to respond to me directly regarding this before I ever contacted Consumerist or the BBB.

      Like many displeased consumers, I decided to report my experience using the avenues at my disposal. I never lied, sued, or extorted in any way. I don’t even expect to get any more money back. I simply wanted to warn other people not to use this company.

  46. Anonymous says:

    Quality Van Lines moved me from CT to FL and absolutely destroyed my furniture. They completely lost some of my belongings, and damaged beyond repair numerous antiques. Their offer of settlement? $200. Beware of this company!!!

  47. Anonymous says:

    I used Quality Van Lines for a move from CT to Miami. They were over 30 hours late with the pick-up, which cost me a days work. When my furniture arrived, they had left my new mattress sitting in water (total loss) and many items were destroyed beyond repair. Also, items were “lost” in transit. I got the same answer regarding their “insurance” policy, although their slick salesman did not explain or offer an alternative. They were totally negligent with my belongings, and hide behide a $.60 per pound rule to refuse reponsibility for their careless actions. My belongings were so damaged, I asked if the truck had been in a major accident! Also, the man making the delivery in Miami refused to unload the truck until I paid him $100 cash up-front. QVL doesn’t take responsibilty for that action either.

    So if you don’t care about your personal belongings, go ahead and use Quality. Otherwise, look elsewhere.