Insane Sears Repair Guy Pours Olive Oil and Super Glue Everywhere

Sometimes tips come in and they’re too insane not to be true. Not that you people don’t have imagination, but a Sears Repair Guy that pours your olive oil all over the inside of the dishwasher? We had to ask for photos. Joseph writes in after two experiences with Sears Repair Guys. The first guy was nice, on-time, and couldn’t fix Joseph’s dryer. So he didn’t charge. No problem. The second guy was, apparently, insane. From Joseph’s email:

    “Next the repairman pulls a tube of super glue from his pocket and informs me he will now attempt to fix the problem by gluing it back together. He then went ahead and wiped off his excess super glue on my F***ING counter-top !! It was at that point I told him that,
    “We pay for a service plan, which means new parts to replace broken parts, not super glue wiped all over everything”
    “Fine. I’ll order the new part, when you receive it, go ahead and replace it yourself”
    ” Well actually, Sears told us you already ordered the new part (supposedly) and thats why you’re here, to put in the new part. And also, once again we pay for a service plan, which means we want you to put in the new part for us, why would we pay to do our own labor?”
    His response?
    Without a word, he grabbed a bottle of olive oil from our counter and then dumped half the contents of the oil all over the internal components of the dishwasher. WTF!!! I still don’t know why he did that. “

Dude. We do not know either. Unfortunately, we are the Consumerists, not psychiatrists. Even if there is a pressing need for olive oil to be inside the inner workings of a dishwasher, he should have brought his own. The good news is that Joseph seems to have the situation well in hand.

“Being the loyal Consumerist.com reader that I am, I knew it was time to escalate, escalate, escalate….I live a mere 15 minutes away from from Colorados only Sears Grand, and since I am a retail merchandiser, I am 1) In Sears Grand every single week 2) have complete access to all levels of upper-management. So this isn’t just going away, Sears. And you’d better make it right ! “

Sears, your repair guy dumped the man’s olive oil inside the internal workings of his dishwasher and then told him to install his own replacement parts. You’re already the most hated repair service in the history of the planet, now you’re just showing off. —MEGHANN MARCO

Joseph’s email inside.

    I’ve read some of the horror stories about Sears repair men, and this morning I had the pleasure of experiencing it myself.

    One year ago our dishwasher conked out, it was no big deal and we’ve since been hand-washing our dishes. Last week our clothes dryer conked out, and so we broke down and called Sears, and we made an appointment for two different service calls, one for the dryer and one for the dishwasher.

    The dryer repair men were very professional and also very nice, waiving the 60$ fee since they couldn’t fix the dryer. A few days later (yesterday) we were called by an automatic messenger informing us that we would need to have a NINE HOUR window available on Monday. Fine, whatever. It’s no big deal to totally re-arrange entire work schedules in order to accommodate Sears blase approach to service.
    No Big Deal, IF Sears would actually 1) fix the appliance, which they didn’t 2) send a repairman with an ounce of professional courtesy, which they didn’t.

    It started like this, 8am this morning I get a call from a surly sounding repairman informing me that,

    “I’ll be at your place inna minute…*CLICK* “.

    ..dial tone without waiting for a confirmation or response from me. That sent up a red-flag right away as to what this encounter would be like. Ten minutes later the repairman shows up, without a word to me he storms over to the dishwasher, opens it up and proceeds to do the following,

    Raises an eyebrow and admonishes me that,

    “You all are using too much soap”

    “Is that what broke it?”

    “No”

    “Whats your point then?”

    Then I remind him that we couldn’t possibly be using “too much soap” because we haven’t even used the thing in over a year. He didn’t respond.

    Next the repairman pulls a tube of super glue from his pocket and informs me he will now attempt to fix the problem by gluing it back together. He then went ahead and wiped off his excess super glue on my F***ING counter-top !! It was at that point I told him that,

    “We pay for a service plan, which means new parts to replace broken parts, not super glue wiped all over everything”

    “Fine. I’ll order the new part, when you receive it, go ahead and replace it yourself”

    ” Well actually, Sears told us you already ordered the new part (supposedly) and thats why you’re here, to put in the new part. And also, once again we pay for a service plan, which means we want you to put in the new part for us, why would we pay to do our own labor?”

    His response?

    Without a word, he grabbed a bottle of olive oil from our counter and then dumped half the contents of the oil all over the internal components of the dishwasher. WTF!!! I still don’t know why he did that.

    He stood up, threw the broken arm and screws on our counter and said,

    “Leave these parts here until I come back”

    ” When will you be back?”

    “Whenever the part I need arrives from Kentucky”

    “We have many children around here, could we put the parts inside the dishwasher?”

    “Do whatever you want”

    Then he left.

    Being the loyal Consumerist.com reader that I am, I knew it was time to escalate, escalate, escalate.
    I phone up Sears Customer Service, which was a whole different pile of BS, and I wont go into it here. Suffice to say the phone rep was just as bad, and ABSOLUETLY NOTHING was resolved, except I now know that Sears will be shipping the new part to my address instead of the repair-shop. I explained to the phone rep that i receive dozens of packages daily from Fedex, UPS and USPS, and their part might get lost. She went ahead and confessed that she didnt really know who would receive the new part, it could be us, it could be them. Her advice was to call back later and see if they knew more, basically doing everything she could to get us off the line, threats to cancel our service plan ignored.

    Thats OK, because I live a mere 15 minutes away from from Colorados only Sears Grand, and since I am a retail merchandiser, I am 1) In Sears Grand every single week 2) have complete access to all levels of upper-management. So this isn’t just going away, Sears. And you’d better make it right !

    Thanks Consumerist,
    Joseph in Colorado.

Comments

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  1. bluegus32 says:

    Ok, that is freaking hilarious!

    My vote? They owe you for cleaning the countertop and now they owe you a new dishwasher. If you don’t get it, file a small claims action.

  2. bluegus32 says:

    That is freakin’ hilarious! My favorite part is when, after the insanity ensues, this dude actually asks the wacky repairman when he’ll be back. Why on Earth would you want this maniac in your house again?

    For that matter, why are you writing the Consumerist? Go down to Sears and yell, yell, yell until you’re heard or arrested.

    Then file a small claims action for a new countertop and new dishwasher.

  3. Bluegus32, that’s funny.

    It’s sort of like “The Aristocrats”: after what you’ve just seen, why could you possibly care what this act is called?

    Asking “When will you be back?” is the height of comedy. A better question would be, “why did you just dump olive oil on the inner components of my dishwasher?” Nope: “When will you be back?”

  4. Triteon says:

    Yeah, that’s it– instead of trying to settle this maturely, sue ‘em first!
    Joseph, it looks like you’re taking the correct steps so far. Do follow-up in person, especially if you have the legitimate threat of taking a considerable volume of business away from them.
    Two questions– not knowing what type of countertop you have: acetone will dissolve the super-glue away, though this is not recommended for marble or granite. And generally on hard, smooth surfaces this glue can be carefully flaked off with a razor blade. But why did you wait a year to call in the repair? Is your service plan perpetual? Most plans end after a prescribed time. It sounds like you accepted a risk there.
    Let us know how this turns out. Good luck!

  5. Weird…. Sounds like the repairman is on drugs or needs to be on drugs… one or the other.

    I’m not sure if small claims is enough for this… I suppose it depends on the value of your countertop and the new dishwasher. You might want to contact your attorney and see what the limits are here… IANAL, but honestly, the repairman’s behavior borders on assault and vandalism/destruction of property, and there might be criminal charges to file here besides the civil.

  6. bluegus32 says:

    Triteon:

    Sorry, man, I’m a lawyer. Knee jerk reaction.

    Joseph, do what Triteon says. If that doesn’t work then sue the bastards.

  7. Hoss says:

    Is it possible that he was trying to wipe off some grease with what looks like lemon dish detergent? If not, you really got him pissed — repair guy revenge!!! Hall of Fame candidate!

    If you do take this to a judge — relevent facts only, and don’t get pissed if the judge doesn’t greet you to your liking

  8. homerjay says:

    I once accidentially put regular dish soap in my dishwasher instead of dishwasher detergent. After a few minutes I noticed foam coming out from the bottom of the door. Upon opening the door I was faced with a fast moving dishwasher-shaped cube of foam and in much the same way reminiscent of when Peter and Bobby Brady put too much soap in clothes washer, hilarity ensued.

    I was told by my repairman to put a little olive oil in the dishwasher and rerun the cycle to clear out all of the foam.

    So, let that be a lesson to you. One guys psycho behavior is another guys quick fix. :)

  9. almaden says:

    Wow, more great service from Sears. These guys go by another name – A&E Factory Service. Kitchen Aid and Whirlpool service is outsourced to A&E, and my family was a victim.

    It started with our 7 year-old, $4000 Kitchen Aid refrigerator not keeping things frozen. I called the 800-number on the inside of the door and was referred to A&E. I called the number and setup a service call. Of course, the first visit is the “order parts” visit, and the A&E tech practically ordered every major part in the fridge. He said to reschedule when all of the parts arrived at the house. At this point the fridge was still halfway working.

    Three weeks later, the parts arrive and we schedule the second service call. A different tech (#2) shows up and proceeds to spend four hours installing all of the parts. Finishing up, he tells my wife that the fridge will take about 24 hours to return to normal.

    “What’s that smell?” she asks. “Oh, that’s what happens when we do a little welding”, he responds. 24-hours later, the fridge has completely stopped working and the kitchen smells like a mix of bad fish and heater oil.

    Call A&E and complain tech #2 broke the fridge – schedule a third service call. A week later the service call comes and goes with no tech. Call and reschedule again for the following week.

    Tech #3 shows up and confirms tech #2 broke the fridge – he didn’t completely weld the copper tubing that cycles the refrigerant, the compressor worked too hard to keep the system cool, and it burned out. Tech #3 orders more parts including duplicates of the first set of replacement parts.

    Two weeks later, new parts have arrived but tech #4 doesn’t show for the service call. Reschedule again.

    I call A&E service to complain to a manager, but I can’t speak directly to the local manager – all communications have to go through the Texas office ?!?

    Eventually, two more techs (#4 and #5) show up and install the pallet-load of parts (new compressor, coils, tubing) and five hours later they get the whole thing working.

    So far, so good – it’s been three months and the fridge seems ok. But, it highlights the problems with any Sears related repair service (A&E included):
    – Poorly trained, or at least inconsistently trained techs
    – Missed service calls
    – “Replace every part in the appliance” approach to troubleshooting
    – Weeks and weeks to resolve repairs
    – Disconnected central and field office communications

    Fortunately, I did not have to pay for this debacle. My fridge has a 12-year warranty.

  10. homerjay says:

    I should be proofreading my posts.

  11. Myron says:

    Bizzare. I hope you took some photos. I suspect with the negative publicity on Consumerist, Sears will fire the repair man and send a NASA certified technician to your house to repair the dishwasher.

  12. Hoss says:

    Homer’s on to something…”You all are using too much soap”…it’s not just a floor wax

  13. Where’s your slow news day now, John?! ;-)

  14. kerry says:

    homerjay -
    Thank you for brightening an otherwise dull afternoon. Man, “fast moving dishwasher-shaped cube of foam.” Hilarious!

  15. Triteon says:

    bluegus32– thanks, and I didn’t want to sound like you should never sue, but use the ability to sue judiciously. (Pun intended!)

  16. madderhatter says:

    @ homerjay – too funny. I did the same thing once but left the kitchen immediately after starting the dishwasher. About 15 minutes later my then 2 year old daughter came in the living room saying “bubbles … bubbles”. Of course I had no idea what she was talking about and ignored her. Well, about five minutes later I knew exactly what she was talking about and the 3 foot thick bubble carpet was coming out of the kitchen and into the dining room.

    FYI – snow shovels are good for scooping up lots of suds and throwing them outside.

  17. Michael says:

    Well, when super glue gets stuck in one’s hair (not that this has never happened to moi… or not more than twice, anyway), it can be loosened by rubbing with olive oil. Maybe he was trying to undo some overzealousness with the glue.

  18. cryrevolution says:

    Well yeah…I used to work for the Sears Texas office that schedules these craptastic repairmen. We had a whole seperate department devoted to accepting calls when either repairmen didn’t bother to show up or f’ed up their assignments. It was pretty sad the amount of calls we got regarding repairman no-shows. And Almaden was right, they outsource repair guys for certain brands to A&E. The crappiness of THOSE repair guys is LEGENDARY with Sears CSR’s. Thankfully I got out of that industry before K-Mart and Sears did the whole buy out thing. I still have nightmares…ugh.

  19. LucyInTheSky says:

    WTF???

  20. timada says:

    I had my dishwasher broke, and I have to admit that I called a friend – not specialist – to repair it, and he spread oil all over inside too. Well, the problem is that after his failure, I called an electrician and he told me that the first problem were two simple small dishwasher parts that needed a replacement, but with that oil spread all over inside, the dishwasher is useless. Now I have to buy a new one. Next time I will forget about friends that could help… oil… and OMG! What a mess he made, just to totally break my dishwasher. Was insane!