transunion

Experian Fined $3M, Accused Of Misleading Consumers About Usefulness Of Credit Scores

Experian Fined $3M, Accused Of Misleading Consumers About Usefulness Of Credit Scores

Two months after federal regulators fined two of the nation’s largest credit reporting agencies — Equifax and TransUnion — $23 million for misleading consumers about the cost and usefulness of credit monitoring services, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has announced a $3 million settlement with Experian over allegations that the credit agency misled consumers about the usefulness of the credit scores available for purchase. [More]

(Chris Blakeley)

Credit Reports Soon Won’t Include Some Tax Lien, Civil Judgment Data

Millions of consumers could soon see their FICO credit scores increase as the three credit reporting agencies — Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion — take another step to overhaul their systems by excluding certain negative information related to tax liens and civil judgments from credit reports. [More]

(frankieleon)

My Identity Was Stolen, Then TransUnion Let The Fraudster Unfreeze My Accounts

One of the smart things to do when your identity has been stolen is to contact the three major credit reporting agencies — TransUnion, Equifax, and Experian — to discuss placing a temporary fraud alert and credit freeze on your accounts. But as one Consumerist reader found out, all it takes to remove those restrictions is the same information that any good ID thief already knows about you. [More]

Chris Blakeley

Equifax, TransUnion To Pay $23M For Misleading Consumers About Credit Monitoring

The nation’s three largest credit reporting agencies — TransUnion, Equifax, and Experian — not only collect consumers’ financial information to assist lenders in gauging whether or not someone is qualified for a loan, fit for a job, or can afford a place to live, they also provide people with credit-related products and resources that are meant to help them keep tabs on or improve their credit. But, according to federal regulators, Equifax and TransUnion haven’t been upfront about the costs and usefulness of these products, and now they’re on the hook for a total $23.1 million in fines and refunds.  [More]

How Much Investigating Should A Credit Bureau Do When Someone Disputes A Debt?

How Much Investigating Should A Credit Bureau Do When Someone Disputes A Debt?

The nation’s three credit bureaus — Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion — are also three of the four most-complained-about companies to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, with 77% of those complaints involving incorrect information on consumers’ credit reports. But when a consumer attempts to dispute a debt on their report, what legal obligation do these agencies have to actually investigate? [More]

John Oliver Trolls Error-Prone Credit Bureaus With Horrible, Sound-Alike Companies

John Oliver Trolls Error-Prone Credit Bureaus With Horrible, Sound-Alike Companies

The three major credit reporting agencies — Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion — receive more complaints from consumers than most banks, primarily because these reports frequently contain errors and they make it incredibly difficult to resolve disputes. The credit industry seems to think its mistakes are within acceptable standards, but will they feel the same way when their brand names are facing similar odds for a disastrous mistake? [More]

Credit Bureaus, Bank Of America, Wells Fargo Top List Of Most Complained-About Financial Companies

Credit Bureaus, Bank Of America, Wells Fargo Top List Of Most Complained-About Financial Companies

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has released its latest report on the various complaints the agency has received about banks, lenders, debt collectors, and other financial services. Amid a sudden increase in the number of complaints involving credit report errors, the country’s largest credit bureaus now dominate the top of the CFPB’s list of most complained-about companies. [More]

How Much Is A Company That Knows All About Your Financial Behavior Worth? Turns Out A Lot.

How Much Is A Company That Knows All About Your Financial Behavior Worth? Turns Out A Lot.

It’s no secret that consumer financial data is valuable: it determines if you get better rates on loans and allows lenders to predict the likelihood you’ll pay back debts. While we can’t necessarily put a price tag on that data (yet), we now know that one of the largest companies to collect that information is worth a bundle – 4 billion bundles, in fact. [More]

Senator Pushes For System To Notify Consumers ‘The Moment Access To Their Credit Is Requested’

Senator Pushes For System To Notify Consumers ‘The Moment Access To Their Credit Is Requested’

It seems like every day, another retailer, service provider, or government agency falls victim to a data breach, and if a hacker uses that stolen info to open up a new line of credit in your name, you may not know until long after the fact. One lawmaker is hoping to curb identity theft by giving consumers a heads-up whenever their credit reports are accessed. [More]

Credit Bureaus Must Pay $6M, Fix Errors More Quickly Under 31-State Agreement

Credit Bureaus Must Pay $6M, Fix Errors More Quickly Under 31-State Agreement

The three largest companies to collect and disseminate credit information for millions of Americans – Experian, Equifax and TransUnion – must significantly change the way they treat disputed information on credit reports as part of a massive multi-state settlement announced this week. [More]

(www.flickr.com/photos/33581199@N04/4231899887)

Nearly 26 Million American Adults Have No Credit History

While a recent survey found that nearly 35% of consumers have never pulled their credit report, a new report from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau points out that some of those consumer might not have anything on their reports anyway. [More]

(20 buckz)

Nearly 35% Of Consumers Have Never Checked Their Credit Reports

While consumers are often urged to take advantage of the free once-a-year opportunity to request a credit report and make sure they aren’t riddled with errors, a new survey suggests many Americans simply aren’t heeding the suggestion. [More]

(Chris Blakeley)

FICO Expands Program To Give Millions Of Consumers Free Access To Credit Scores & Reports

Millions of financially struggling consumers who work with qualified nonprofit counseling agencies now have access to free credit scores and credit reports with the expansion of the FICO Score Open Access program. [More]

Chris Blakeley

Credit Bureaus Agree To Revamp Practices For Handling Errors, Unpaid Medical Bills

Experian, Equifax and TransUnion – the three largest companies to collect and disseminate credit information for millions of Americans – must undergo an overhaul of credit reporting practices as part of an agreement with the New York Attorney General’s Office. [More]

How To Not Suck… At Disputing Credit Report Errors

How To Not Suck… At Disputing Credit Report Errors

Like it or hate it, your credit report and credit score have lots of power. These may determine whether or not you’re approved for a mortgage, car loan, or other borrowing, and will determine the interest rates on your credit cards. This information is often even used when you’re evaluated for an apartment, insurance or a job, or try to get a bank account. That’s why it’s incredibly important to check your credit report for errors, as mistakes on your report can haunt every part of your financial life for years. [More]

(frankieleon)

Companies That Furnish Info For Credit Reports Are Obligated To Investigate Disputes

More than 1-in-4 credit reports contain some sort of error, according to a recent Federal Trade Commission report, but one can’t lay all the blame at the feet of the three major credit bureaus — Experian, TransUnion, Equifax — as the companies that supply this information are not always fulfilling their legal obligation to investigate disputes by consumers. [More]

(Alec Peden)

Bill Would Allow Consumers To Get Free Credit Score When Receiving Free Credit Reports

Right now, U.S. consumers can check each of their three credit reports — from TransUnion, Equifax, and Experian — once a year for free through AnnualCreditReport.com, but getting your actual credit score will probably cost you. Legislation introduced today seeks to remedy this issue.

[More]

Knowing your accurate FICO score might be sweeter than chocolates.

This Valentine’s Day, Tell Congress You’d Really Love Access To A Free, Reliable Credit Score

While the three major credit bureaus each allow you to access your credit report once a year at no charge through annualcreditreport.com, getting your actual credit score will likely cost you some money. [More]