scotus

brett jordan

2 Years After Being Sentenced, Egg Execs Behind Massive Salmonella Outbreak Are Finally Going To Prison

In April 2015, a federal judge sentenced the father and son former executives of the inaccurately named Quality Egg — the company behind a salmonella outbreak that sickened around 60,000 people — to three months in prison, but neither of the two men have begun to serve their sentence, hoping the U.S. Supreme Court would see things their way. But now that the Supremes have snubbed the eggs-executives, it’s finally time for them to do their brief stints behind bars. [More]

Ben Sutherland

SCOTUS To Hear Case Of Bakery That Refused To Make Wedding Cake For Gay Couple

The owner of a Colorado bakery who refused to make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple back in 2012 will have his day in the highest court in the land, after the U.S. Supreme Court agreed today to hear his appeal. [More]

Supreme Court Rejects ‘Dancing Baby’ YouTube Copyright Case

Supreme Court Rejects ‘Dancing Baby’ YouTube Copyright Case

After 10 years, the legal battle over a silly 29-second YouTube video of a baby dancing to a Prince song has hit a dead end, with the Supreme Court announcing this morning that it will not hear arguments in this high-profile copyright case. [More]

afagen

Supreme Court: It’s Unconstitutional To Reject Potentially Offensive Trademarks

The Supreme Court has struck down a longstanding clause in federal law that prohibits the Patent and Trademark Office from registering trademarks that “disparage… persons, living or dead, institutions, beliefs, or national symbols, or bring them into contempt, or disrepute.” [More]

(Jeff Kubina)

Supreme Court: Protections Against Debt Collectors Don’t Apply To Banks That Purchase Defaulted Loans

The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act prohibits debt collectors from a number of annoying and aggressive practices, like calling late at night to hassle folks about their debt or publicly outing people as debtors. However, this morning — in Justice Neil Gorsuch’s first opinion — the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that this law doesn’t apply to banks that purchase defaulted loans with the intention of collecting on them. [More]

Justice Dept. Says Supreme Court Should Not Hear ‘Dancing Baby’ YouTube Case

Justice Dept. Says Supreme Court Should Not Hear ‘Dancing Baby’ YouTube Case

A decade-old legal dispute over a 29-second YouTube clip featuring a baby dancing to a barely audible Prince tune may not have its day before the Supreme Court, at least if the nine justices take the suggestion of the Justice Department. [More]

eric_harvieux

Supreme Court Says Cities Can Sue Banks Over Fair Housing Violations

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled this morning that cities are allowed to sue banks for alleged violations of the Fair Housing Act if the city is able to show that it was harmed by a bank’s discriminatory actions. [More]

afagen

Supreme Court: General Motors Can’t Use Bankruptcy To Avoid Lawsuits Over Deadly Ignition Defect

The Supreme Court has denied General Motors’ legal efforts to use its 2009 bankruptcy to block lawsuits over injuries and financial losses related to the carmaker’s long-ignored ignition switch defect. [More]

frankieleon

Supreme Court: State’s Restriction On Credit Card Surcharges Is A Free Speech Regulation

The U.S. Supreme Court has determined that a New York state law barring merchants from adding credit card surcharges is indeed a state regulation on businesses’ free expression. However, whether that law goes so far as to violate the First Amendment is a matter still to be decided. [More]

Supreme Court’s Ruling In Cheerleader Uniform Case Could Lead To Higher Prices For Clothing, Furniture

Supreme Court’s Ruling In Cheerleader Uniform Case Could Lead To Higher Prices For Clothing, Furniture


This morning, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a ruling in a case that involves cheerleader uniforms, but which some critics believe could eventually result in higher prices for everything from clothing to furniture to housewares. [More]

afagen

Supreme Court Hears Arguments In Dispute Over “Scandalous” Trademarks

Should your company’s brand, slogan, or logo lose its federal trademark protection just because it’s offensive? Under current law, yes, but today the Supreme Court heard arguments in a case that questions whether or not the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office should involve itself in questions of taste. [More]

Adam Fagen

Supreme Court Asked To Settle Battle Over Courtroom Ban On Phones, Computers

For more than 35 years, states have been allowed to let cameras in the courtroom, but some courts have enacted full bans — not just on TV cameras and photographers but on all electronic devices, and at all times. A Michigan man thinks this is going too far, and has officially petitioned the Supreme Court to settle the matter. [More]

Gem

Is A Restriction On Credit Card Surcharges A Free Speech Violation?

When you think of First Amendment disputes, your mind probably conjures images of protestors, or investigative journalism, or maybe you think of the never-ending debate over where to draw the line between obscenity and protected forms of expression. You probably don’t immediately connect the dots between the First Amendment and a state law about credit card surcharges — but the U.S. Supreme Court has been asked to decide that very issue. [More]

afagen

Supreme Court Overturns $399M Verdict In Long-Running Apple/Samsung Patent Spat

The seemingly never-ending smartphone patent slapfight between Apple and Samsung continues on, with the U.S. Supreme Court ruling today that a $399 million jury award granted to Apple needs to be reassessed because the iPhone maker isn’t entitled to all of the profits from the infringing Samsung devices. [More]

Why The Supreme Court Suddenly Cares About Cheerleader Uniforms

Why The Supreme Court Suddenly Cares About Cheerleader Uniforms

When you strip off the logos from your typical cheerleader’s uniform — especially in high school and college — you’re left with something that is still distinctly an outfit meant for a cheerleader. But can a uniform manufacturer copyright that basic uniform design? It’s a question currently before the U.S. Supreme Court, and one whose answer could have far-reaching implications. [More]

Supreme Court Asks Feds To Chime In On Decade-Old “Dancing Baby” YouTube Case

Supreme Court Asks Feds To Chime In On Decade-Old “Dancing Baby” YouTube Case

A nearly decade-long copyright dispute over a silly YouTube video of a baby dancing to a barely audible Prince song continues, with the U.S. Supreme Court now asking for the federal government to give its thoughts on the matter. [More]

Jim Chambers

Should Police Need A Warrant To Obtain Your Cellphone Location Data?

On TV and in the movies, when the police want location information on a suspect’s cellphone, the world-weary detectives just mosey into the office of a wireless company and bully/sweet-talk the receptionist into handing over this information by saying things like “You don’t want us to have to wait here while we get a warrant, do you?” In the real world, it’s not that simple, and the question of whether or not an actual warrant is needed has yet to be resolved. [More]

photographybynatalia

23 Lawmakers Want To Know What DOJ Would Do With Expanded Hacking Authority

The U.S. Congress has a month to decide on what it should do about a pending rule change that would arguably grant federal law enforcement agencies more authority to remotely hack into computers. Congress can let this amended rule go into effect by doing nothing, so before they let their idleness get the better of them, a group of nearly two-dozen members of the House and Senate are now pushing the Justice Department for more details. [More]