Newegg Challenges Alabama Over Collection Of Online Sales Tax

Newegg Challenges Alabama Over Collection Of Online Sales Tax

For nearly 25 years, the general standard for whether a state could compel a mail-order or online retailer to collect sales tax from customers was that retailer’s physical presence (or lack thereof) in that state. More recently, some states have tweaked their laws so that total sales — and not physical connection — is the determining factor. Online tech store Newegg is the latest retailer to challenge these new rules, taking issue with Alabama’s determination that the company owes the state more than $185,000 in sales tax. [More]

Mike Seyfang

States Hungry For Online Sales Tax Looking At Challenge To South Dakota Law

Amazon now collects sales tax in more than half the states, but that still leaves a substantial portion of the country not paying taxes on their purchases. Even in states where Amazon is collecting taxes, some other online retailers say they don’t have to collect taxes because they have no physical presence in the state. A new South Dakota law is a direct attack on these companies, and if it stands up to legal scrutiny it could have nationwide implications. [More]

Roebot

New York’s Tampon Tax Will Soon Be A Thing Of The Past

It looks like women in New York will be saving some money when they buy tampons in the future, now that the state’s Assembly has agreed with the Senate, and unanimously voted to repeal a sales tax on feminine hygiene products. [More]

(Brad Cerenzia)

Illinois Could Be Next State To Do Away With “Pink Tax” On Feminine Hygiene Products

Just a week after five New York women filed a lawsuit against the state’s Department of Taxation and Finance for tacking on sales tax to tampons, Illinois lawmakers have advanced a bill that would exempt feminine hygiene and incontinence products from state sales tax.  [More]

Roebot

Lawsuit: New York Shouldn’t Charge Sales Tax On Tampons

Should tampon sales be taxed by the state? Five Manhattan women don’t think so, and have filed a lawsuit against New York’s Department of Taxation and Finance saying it should be tax-free. [More]

Lawsuit Claims Dunkin’ Donuts Overcharged NJ, NY Customers By $14 Million Over Three Years

Lawsuit Claims Dunkin’ Donuts Overcharged NJ, NY Customers By $14 Million Over Three Years

Dunkin’ Donuts customers in New York and New Jersey are claiming in a new lawsuit that the company doesn’t understand how sales tax works in those states, resulting in combined overcharges worth nearly $14 million. That could buy a lot of coffee. [More]

Mike Mozart

Ulta Has A Great Return Policy, Except For Keeping My Sales Tax

Vee made a small purchase from the cosmetics store Ulta, and needed to return it. That happens. Where things got confusing, though, is that she didn’t receive a refund of the sales tax she had paid. When she questioned this, a store representative’s response was that “the website does not state that we do not give the taxes back when making a return.” What? [More]

No, You Shouldn’t Incorporate And Register Your Car Tax-Free In Montana

No, You Shouldn’t Incorporate And Register Your Car Tax-Free In Montana

Car ownership is fun and convenient, but paying sales tax, use tax, or personal property tax on your car is expensive and annoying. What if you could avoid that, and avoid annual car inspections, just by filling out a little bit of paperwork? That’s the premise of companies that offer to help you incorporate in Montana, have your corporation own the vehicle, and pay no taxes. [More]

12 States Holding Sales Tax Holidays This Weekend

Were you thinking about doing some shopping this weekend, for back-to-school season or just in general? Find out whether your state is holding a tax holiday, where state sales taxes are waived on certain categories of items: usually clothes, but sometimes also personal electronics, appliances, and hunting supplies, including firearms. Tax holidays and their limits vary regionally and your county or municipality may not be participating; check the rules before you shop. However, make sure that you don’t confuse it for a shopping spree. [Consumer Reports]

(Laurice Marier)

Chicago Will Have The Highest Sales Tax In The U.S. At 10.25%

Sales taxes are variable from place to place and very visible, and they’re visible day-to-day as we dig in our pockets for change to pay a coffee tab of $3.14. Starting next year, Chicago will have the highest sales tax in the country, with state, county and city taxes adding up to 10.25%. [More]

(Mike Mozart)

Class-Action Suit Over Shortchanged Walmart Returns Allowed To Move Forward

While Walmart customers enjoy the ability to return items to any of the retailer’s locations, a number of these shoppers have claimed over the years that they were getting less for their returns than they should have because of sales tax differences between the purchase and return locations. Last week, a federal judge allowed a pending class action regarding shortchanged Walmart customers to continue. [More]

(Great Beyond)

Minnesotans Only Have A Week Of “Tax-Free” Shopping Left On Amazon

You can now add Minnesota to the growing list of states where Amazon will be collecting sales tax from customers after a surprise announcement on Monday that, starting Oct. 1, shoppers in the state will start seeing the tax added to their purchases. [More]

Find Out If Your State Has A Back-To-School Sales Tax Holiday This Month

Don

Earlier today, the calendar flipped from July to August, and kids everywhere groaned with the realization that they will soon have to be going back to school. But the even louder grousing you’re hearing this morning is from parents envisioning their bank accounts being drained by purchases of backpacks, clothes, pencils (do kids even use those anymore?), and those individual packs of tissues that will never be used but you buy anyway. What some of these parents don’t know is that a number of states have sales tax holidays in August — many of them starting today — to ease the burden of back-to-school spending. [More]

In States With Amazon Sales Tax, People Spend Less On Amazon

In States With Amazon Sales Tax, People Spend Less On Amazon

Many people order things from Amazon because it’s incredibly convenient — no driving to the store; no waiting in line; no shoving into the back of your car… and in many states, no collection of sales tax. A new study tries to figure out the impact of removing that last incentive from the equation. [More]

It’s Florida Customers’ Turn To Pay Sales Tax On Amazon Purchases

It’s Florida Customers’ Turn To Pay Sales Tax On Amazon Purchases

There’s good news and bad news for Florida: yes, there is an Amazon distribution warehouse in their fine state now, which means faster delivery of the stuff they impulsively ordered at 3 A.M., and also gives some people jobs. The downside to this sprawling city of stuff is that it means Amazon now has a physical location in their state, and they’ll have to pay sales tax on their purchases. [More]

Online State Sales Tax Solution Remains Elusive After Congress Declares ‘Fundamental Defects’ In Senate Bill

Online State Sales Tax Solution Remains Elusive After Congress Declares ‘Fundamental Defects’ In Senate Bill

After years of attempts to craft a federal law that would affirm states’ rights to tax online purchases, the issue may still be far from being resolved. The House Judiciary Committee has put the brakes on the Marketplace Fairness Act passed by the Senate in May. [More]

Connecticut Walmarts Charged Sales Tax On Tax-Exempt Gun Safes

Connecticut Walmarts Charged Sales Tax On Tax-Exempt Gun Safes

Since 1999, shoppers in Connecticut have not had to pay the state’s 6.35% sales tax on gun safes and other firearms-safety items, but someone forgot to tell the Walmarts of Connecticut, which have been improperly charging the tax to customers. [More]

Lawsuit Accuses Walmart Of Overcharging Taxes On Coupon Purchases

Lawsuit Accuses Walmart Of Overcharging Taxes On Coupon Purchases

A Pennsylvania man’s purchase of two cans of shaving cream at Walmart has ballooned into a lawsuits against the nation’s largest retailer, which stands accused of not taking coupons into account when calculating sales tax. [More]