Man Who Made Fake News Sites To Sell “Pure Green Coffee” Must Pay $30M To Customers

Man Who Made Fake News Sites To Sell “Pure Green Coffee” Must Pay $30M To Customers

Two years after the Federal Trade Commission sued the marketers of the “Pure Green Coffee” for using fake news sites and fictional reporters to push the weight-loss supplement, the man behind those companies has been ordered to repay $30 million to customers tricked into buying the product. [More]

Dr. Oz Grilled By Senator Over “Miracle” Weight-Loss Claims

Dr. Oz Grilled By Senator Over “Miracle” Weight-Loss Claims

Since he started appearing on pal Oprah Winfrey’s show a decade ago, and especially since he launched his own inexplicably popular daytime talk show in 2009, Dr. Mehmet Oz has had a history of being a bit overly enthusiastic about some of the alternative and nontraditional treatments he’s highlighted, resulting in countless scammers cashing in on the questionable weight-loss treatments he’s described as “miracles,” like the green coffee extract that is the subject of an ongoing federal action. This morning, Dr. Oz is appearing before a Senate subcommittee and admitting that his “cheerleading” for products that he admits are just “crutches” has caused trouble for himself and for the Federal Trade Commission. [More]

Sellers Of “Pure Green Coffee” Accused Of Faking News Sites, Creating Bogus Reporter

On the left, "staff reporter Helen Hasman," who has an identical twin in Mélissa Theuriau on the right.

If you’re a regular watcher of the ethically questionable Dr. Oz, then you may remember how he helped start a minor “green coffee extract” craze a couple years back by declaring it a miracle weight loss drug. In an attempt to cash in on this dubious hype, a number of sites started popping up within weeks, repeating and exaggerating the already puffed-up claims, and using fake endorsements, faux news articles and fictional “reporters.” [More]