privacy

@ORIG3N_Inc

Baltimore Ravens Postpone DNA Test Giveaway After Public Health Officials Get Involved

If you showed up to the Baltimore Raven’s home opener on Sunday expecting to receive a free DNA test, you were likely sorely disappointed. The NFL team’s planned promotion with Orig3n was canceled at the last-minute following increased scrutiny from federal and state health officials.  [More]

unobtainable

California ISP Privacy Bill Stalls Out After Heavy Pushback From Industry

There is no federal-level law protecting your private web data from your internet-providing company anymore, and there likely won’t be a replacement anytime soon. So some states are trying to take matters into their own hands. But the latest, last-ditch effort in the tech capital of the U.S. has failed, after strong pushback from the very companies it would regulate. [More]

@ORIG3N_Inc

Would You Take A DNA Test At An NFL Game? The Baltimore Ravens Want You To

Fans attending the Baltimore Ravens’ home opener on Sunday will be leaving more than empty cups, nacho tins, and possibly their team spirit when they exit M&T Bank Stadium: Guests can leave their DNA to be tested if they take part in the team’s latest promotion. [More]

Motel 6 Admits Some Locations Were Sharing Lists Of Guests With Immigration Officers On Daily Basis

Motel 6 Admits Some Locations Were Sharing Lists Of Guests With Immigration Officers On Daily Basis

When you check into a hotel and provide a photo ID, your expectation is that the hotel will be holding this info for its records in case you mess up the room or try to skip out on your bill. What you don’t expect is that the hotel management is taking its daily guest logs and turning them over to federal immigration officials. [More]

Blogtrepreneur

It’s Not Just The U.S. — Equifax Security Issues Causing Headaches Around The World

We already know that more than 143 million Americans’ personal identify information was compromised as part of Equinox’s two-month-long data breach. If you thought that was bad enough, it gets worse: The credit reporting agency’s lax data security may have affected tens of millions more consumers across the world. [More]

USACE HQ

Department Of Homeland Security Sued Over Warrantless Searches Of Electronic Devices At The U.S. Border

Although it’s illegal for a police officer to search your electronic devices without a warrant — even after you’re arrested — the Department of Homeland Security says warrantless searches of digital content are allowed at any U.S. border. Privacy advocates and civil rights organizations are now suing the agency, claiming that border protection officers should also have a warrant before they’re allowed to search through residents’ laptops and phones. [More]

Equifax Already Being Sued Over Massive Breach; Company Criticized For Amateurish Response To Theft

Equifax Already Being Sued Over Massive Breach; Company Criticized For Amateurish Response To Theft

Within hours of Equifax — one of the nation’s three major credit bureaus — confirming that the records of some 143 million people had been compromised in a data breach, the company now faces a lawsuit accusing it of failing to protect its stockpile of sensitive consumer information. Meanwhile, some critics are saying that Equifax’s response to the breach may be causing more harm than good. [More]

Lenovo Will Pay $3.5 Million To States For Privacy-Invading Ad Software

Lenovo Will Pay $3.5 Million To States For Privacy-Invading Ad Software

Only hours after Lenovo got off with what amounted to a warning and a promise to not do illegal stuff going forward, the tech company has agreed to pay a total of $3.5 million to a coalition of 32 states to settle allegations that Lenovo knowingly sold laptops that came with ad-injection software that put all of their online data at risk. [More]

Lenovo Gets Slap On Wrist From Feds Over Pre-Installed Ad Software With Gaping Security Hole

Lenovo Gets Slap On Wrist From Feds Over Pre-Installed Ad Software With Gaping Security Hole

Remember that time that Lenovo sold all those laptops with crappy ad-injection software built in, leaving users at risk for both bottom-of-the-barrel advertising and cyber attacks? Today, the tech company settled a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission, promising not to do this all again and not paying a penalty for its alleged transgressions. [More]

jsbn123

CVS Accused Of Revealing HIV Status Of 4,000 Ohio Customers

Days after insurance giant Aenta was accused of revealing the HIV medication use of 12,000 customers, CVS has found itself in a similar boat: The pharmacy giant allegedly sent letters to customers that inadvertently revealed their HIV status. [More]

Uber | YouTube

Uber Finally Lets You Opt Out Of Having Your Location Tracked After Your Ride Is Over

Late last year, Uber made a change to its app that let it track customers after their rides had ended. Many troubled months later, the company is finally walking back that tweak, and will once again let customers have more control over when their locations are used. [More]

Aetna Accused Of Revealing HIV Medication Use Of 12,000 Customers

Aetna Accused Of Revealing HIV Medication Use Of 12,000 Customers

Something as minor as an envelope window has landed one of the country’s largest insurance companies in legal hot water. Aetna is being sued for sending out thousands of letters that inadvertently revealed that the recipient has taken medication for the treatment or prevention of HIV. [More]

Aetna Letters Publicly Revealed Patients’ HIV Status

Aetna Letters Publicly Revealed Patients’ HIV Status

Health insurance giant Aetna recently alerted thousands of policyholders of a change to their pharmacy benefits. Problem is, Aetna sent those letters out in envelopes that revealed that the recipient is HIV positive. [More]

Sonos

Sonos Holds Software Updates Hostage If You Don’t Sign New Privacy Agreement

Sonos, the current popular brand of smart speaker that people don’t [yet] talk to, really wants its customers to agree to the company’s new privacy policy; so much so, that failing to acknowledge the new rules can turn your Sonos speakers into very expensive shelf decorations when they eventually “cease to function.” [More]

Justice Dept. Decides It No Longer Wants Info On 1.3 Million Visitors To Anti-Trump Site

Justice Dept. Decides It No Longer Wants Info On 1.3 Million Visitors To Anti-Trump Site

The U.S. Department of Justice recently tried to compel a website hosting company to turn over all the information the company has on the approximately 1.3 million internet users who visited a site created to organize a protest during President Trump’s inauguration. Now the DOJ is rethinking that plan, withdrawing its demand for this mountain of data. [More]

Joe Gratz

Why You Should Care About This Lawsuit Against A Data Company You’ve Probably Never Heard Of

The legal system has long taken a “no harm, no foul” approach to certain legal disputes: If you haven’t actually been injured by the other party’s actions, you’ll have a hard time convincing the court that your lawsuit shouldn’t be thrown out. But the internet, where incorrect information can be disseminated globally within seconds (and may never truly be erased), is causing courts to reconsider the question: When can you sue a company for an intangible harm? [More]

Elliott Brown

Uber Settles Federal Allegations It Deceived Customers About Privacy & Data Security

Uber has reached a deal with the Federal Trade Commission to settle the government’s investigation into the ride-hailing service’s allegedly questionable privacy practices.
[More]

LinkedIn Can’t Block Third-Party Scanning Of Public Profiles To Identify Employees Most Likely To Leave

LinkedIn Can’t Block Third-Party Scanning Of Public Profiles To Identify Employees Most Likely To Leave

LinkedIn is trying to stop a third-party analytics firm from scanning publicly available profiles on the networking site with the purpose of identifying employees most likely to jump ship to a competitor. But a federal judge has granted an injunction against LinkedIn, saying the company appears to be misinterpreting the law in a way that “could profoundly impact open access to the Internet.” [More]