Your Personal Data Could Be For Sale In RadioShack Bankruptcy Auction

Your Personal Data Could Be For Sale In RadioShack Bankruptcy Auction

Have you handed your name, address, e-mail address, or phone number over to RadioShack as part of a purchase or, inexplicably, when you returned an item that you bought with cash? As the bankruptcy auction of the smoldering remains of The Shack continues into its second day, we’ve learned that one of the assets for sale is RadioShack’s customer list, which includes more than 65 million mailing addresses and more than 13 million e-mail addresses. [More]

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Amazon’s Streaming Gaming Service Twitch Says It Might Be The Latest Victim Of A Data Breach

The long list of data breaches got a bit longer on Monday after Amazon-owned game streaming company Twitch determined hackers may have gained unauthorized access to some users’ account information. [More]

AT&T Asked RadioShack To Destroy Customer And Proprietary Information

AT&T Asked RadioShack To Destroy Customer And Proprietary Information

The auction for the smoldering remains of RadioShack is happening right now at the offices of the company’s attorneys in New York City, and something caught our attention while we wait for news about the winning bidders and future of the Shack and its stores and employees. AT&T has filed an objection to the proceedings in court, asking RadioShack to destroy any sensitive information about customers and AT&T itself. [More]

(Adam Fagen)

Hilton HHonors Site Flaw Exposed All Accounts To Potential Hijacking

Following a report of a spike in hijacked accounts, Hilton recently asked its HHonors Awards members to change their passwords — offering them 1,000 bonus points if they did so before April 1. But cybersecurity experts say that hackers didn’t actually need passwords to take control of other folks’ HHonors accounts. [More]

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Legislation Would Limit How Education Companies Use Students’ Online Data

With the use of technology now tightly tied to education, consumer advocates and parent groups have increasingly voiced concern about how student data is used. New legislation aims to alleviate worries over the exploitation of students’ personal information by placing restrictions on how that data can be used by third-party technology companies. [More]

(Mike Mozart)

Target Poised To Settle Class-Action Suit Related To Massive 2013 Hack For $10M

More than a year after Target announced that it had been victim to a massive data breach during the 2013 holiday season, the company is poised to pay $10 million to settle a class-action suit stemming from the incident. [More]

Health Insurer Premera Blue Cross Latest Hack Victim, 11M Consumers Affected

Health Insurer Premera Blue Cross Latest Hack Victim, 11M Consumers Affected

Just a month after tens of millions of consumers’ personal information was breached in the hack of health insurance firm Anthem, another U.S.-based insurance provider says it was the victim of a cyber attack affecting as many as 11 million customers. [More]

This Talking Barbie Doll Can Listen To You… And Share What You Say With Third Parties

This Talking Barbie Doll Can Listen To You… And Share What You Say With Third Parties

Since some imaginative cave child made the first doll out of a dead marmot, kids have been talking to their make-believe pals. And for more than a century, some of these dolls have been talking back. But the newest generation of Mattel Barbie dolls may take things to the next level by not only listening to what you have to say, but by sharing your conversations with complete strangers. [More]

(Bill Binns)

Report: Google Error Leaks Hidden Data For 280,000 Domains

Usually when we hear that a company has had a bunch of data leaked to the world, hackers are responsible. But in the case of a Google leak involving hidden data for 280,000 domain names, a bug in Google’s system is apparently to blame. [More]

Apple Clarifies Requirements For Medical Research Apps

Apple Clarifies Requirements For Medical Research Apps

Earlier this week, Apple announced HeathKit, an open-source software framework to help medical researchers use iPhones to gather data for medical research. This raised some concerns about researchers’ plans to share data collected from the apps, as well as consent and privacy. Now Apple has revised their App Store guidelines before the kit launches, but is that enough to keep study participants informed and safe? [More]

FTC Chair Edith Ramirez Talks Privacy, Data Security

FTC Chair Edith Ramirez Talks Privacy, Data Security

You may now be able to change your thermostat from another continent, your fridge might know when you need to buy more eggs, and your connected TV recommends shows and movies. But is your data being used for things other than keeping your house warm, your eggs in stock, and your kids entertained — and, just as importantly — is it secure? [More]

The Privacy And Consent Issues With Apple’s New ResearchKit

The Privacy And Consent Issues With Apple’s New ResearchKit

Earlier this week, Apple gave us wrist computers and took away almost all of the ports in its notebook computers, and also announced something that gadget fans may not have expected: a set of apps called ResearchKit designed to help medical researchers collect data from ordinary citizens for their research. Tens of thousands of people have already signed up for studies, which is potentially great for science. Is it good for us, the potential research subjects, though? [More]

(Chris Blakeley)

Americans Don’t Think Personal Data Is Secure, Still Trade It For Coupons

What information are you willing to give up to get a discount or other benefits from a retailer? The consulting company Accenture wanted to know how comfortable we are with all of this, and what information we might be willing to give up for rewards from merchants. Broadly speaking, it depends on what they’re offering. [More]

(Mike Mozart)

Wikimedia, Amnesty International, Others Sue NSA Over Mass Surveillance

The foundation behind Wikipedia, along with several other high-profile non-profit organizations, has sued the National Security Agency challenging its “suspicionless seizure and searching of internet traffic” in the U.S., claiming that this mass data collection goes beyond what the law allows the NSA to collect and that it violates protections afforded by the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. [More]

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Lawsuit Claims Toyota, GM & Ford Deceived Consumers About Hackability Of Connected Cars

A recently filed class action lawsuit claims that Toyota, Ford and General Motors knowingly put consumers at risk by selling connected cars that can be susceptible to hackers looking to remotely control vehicle functionality.  [More]

Lawmakers Want To Know Who’s Tracking You Online, And Where The Info Goes

Lawmakers Want To Know Who’s Tracking You Online, And Where The Info Goes

Everything you do online — on your phone, on your computer, with anything — leaves a digital wake. Put those trails together and you’ve got one massive big data industry that can (and does) track it all and sell it to the highest bidder. After decades of digital detritus building up, regulators and Congress both are contemplating some steps that would help protect consumers’ info. [More]

What Is The FREAK Flaw And How Much Should I, Well, Freak Out About It?

What Is The FREAK Flaw And How Much Should I, Well, Freak Out About It?

There are certain websites that you expect to be secure. The NSA’s and FBI’s sites, for example, or any shopping site you enter your credit card information on. They say HTTPS, and they show a lock, so they’re fine, right? Wrong. A team of researchers this week has announced the finding of a flaw they’re calling FREAK. It interferes with that encryption and makes some sites vulnerable — and it’s everywhere. Not just on laptop and desktop computers, but also on mobile phones and tables. Here’s what you need to know. [More]

(Adam Fagen)

Report: Stolen Credit Card Information Used By Fraudsters To Make Purchases With Apple Pay

A rash in data breaches at national retailers may have led fraudsters to use Apple Pay to make big-ticket purchases with credit card information stolen during national data breaches. [More]