William Hook

Feds Use Search Warrant To Make Everyone In Building Unlock Their Phones

If the cops show up with a search warrant, well, you expect they can search the premises. But showing up with a warrant that says every single person on a certain property has to unlock their fingerprint-reading phones and present them for search, too? That’s… pretty surprising. And yet, it turns out, earlier this year, that’s what happened in California. [More]

Morton Fox

Yahoo Explains Why It Turned Off Email Auto-Forwarding; Turns It Back On

Earlier this week, we told you about Yahoo Mail users complaining that they could no longer use the auto-forward function to have things from their Yahoo account forwarded to a different address. Now Yahoo is explaining why it turned off this function, and why it’s turned it back on. [More]


Subway Worker Accused Of Filming Women In The Restroom

A Subway employee in Seattle is facing charges of voyeurism and possession of child pornography after allegedly filming women in the restaurant’s bathroom without their knowledge. [More]

Chris Blakeley

Final FCC Privacy Rule Won’t Ban Pay-For-Privacy, Will Require Some Opt-Ins

The FCC certainly is keeping busy this fall. After six months of mulling it over, commission chairman Tom Wheeler announced today that the final version of a privacy rule that would limit what your broadband carrier can do with your personal data is in fact real and on the agenda for the FCC’s October meeting later this month. [More]


Yahoo Calls Report Claiming It Snooped On Emails For U.S. Government “Misleading”

After a report this week claimed Yahoo built a tool specially designed to help U.S. intelligence and law enforcement agencies eavesdrop on its email users’ conversations, the tech company has issued another, lengthier response, without flat out denying anything. [More]


Why Is It So Hard To See What’s Inside The “Black Box” Determining What Prices You Get Online?

You’re a savvy shopper, a well-educated consumer. You know to shop around to look for the best price on something before you fork over your cash. And after doing all your homework, you find out from Facebook that a friend on the other side of the country got the same item from the same website for less than you just paid. Why? How? Because an algorithm decided how much each of you should pay, and there’s nothing you can do about it. [More]

Morton Fox

Yahoo Reportedly Built Tool To Snoop On All Its Emails For U.S. Government

It’s one thing to comply with a court order from law enforcement seeking access to a user’s email account; it’s another to build a tool specifically to help U.S. intelligence and law enforcement agencies eavesdrop on those online discussions. A new report claims that Yahoo did just that last year by creating a program that allowed the company to scour all of its messages on behalf of the government. [More]

Johnson & Johnson Warns Patients Insulin Pump Is Hackable But “Low Risk” Of Attack

Johnson & Johnson Warns Patients Insulin Pump Is Hackable But “Low Risk” Of Attack

Tech can be pretty great, and smart, connected tech can be really great. Miniaturization and the ability to control devices remotely has led to some fantastic advances in, for example, health care. But today in “wow, our glorious tech-driven future is so strange and dystopic some days,” we are reminded that anything that can be networked is vulnerable, and can be hacked. [More]

Mike Mozart

AT&T Ends Snooping Program, Stops Charging Internet Users Extra For Privacy

AT&T offers GigaPower subscribers in several cities two options: pay $70 for your connection and get your data snooped on, or keep your privacy and pay $99. The company has regularly defended the program from critics, and claimed that it’s basically the wave of the future. And yet today, seemingly out of nowhere, A&T has suddenly announced that it will be dropping the option nationwide, and charging all consumers the same — lower — price. [More]

C x 2

AT&T Again Complaining It’s Unfair If Web Companies Can Sell Your Data But They Can’t

We are sure you will be shocked, shocked to hear that a major telecom company that currently makes some money from having customers pay to keep private data private wants to be able to continue doing so whenever possible. And yet, here we are. [More]

Verizon Employee Illegally Sold Customer Information For As Little As $50/Month

Mike Mozart

A Verizon Wireless employee has pleaded guilty to violating federal law by selling customer phone records and location data to a private investigator, starting at a measly $50 a month. [More]

Trump Hotel Group Settles With NY Attorney General Over Credit Card Data Breaches

Trump Hotel Group Settles With NY Attorney General Over Credit Card Data Breaches

In the wake of two data breaches at hotels operating under the Trump Hotel Collection umbrella, the attorney general for the state of New York has reached a settlement with the company that involves a small financial penalty and promises of improved data security. [More]

How Much Control Do You Actually Have Over Your Private Data?

Library of Congress

“Privacy” is the buzz of our era, but… what even is privacy? Different consumers, businesses, and regulators each have their own definitions and perspectives on the issue, while the law, too, is always evolving. [More]

News Organizations Sue FBI To Find Out Who & How Much It Paid To Unlock Terrorist’s iPhone

News Organizations Sue FBI To Find Out Who & How Much It Paid To Unlock Terrorist’s iPhone

In the months following the tragic Dec. 2, 2015 terrorist attack in San Bernardino, the FBI and Apple engaged in a heated legal (and publicity) battle over whether or not the tech giant could be compelled to unlock an iPhone belonging to one of the attackers. Then in March 2016, the FBI paid an unidentified third party to provide a solution this particular problem. The identity and actual cost of this unlocking is still unknown, but two of the country’s biggest media companies have sued the FBI to learn more. [More]

Why Do I Suddenly Have To Log In Now To Use The Graphics Card I’ve Had For Years?

Why Do I Suddenly Have To Log In Now To Use The Graphics Card I’ve Had For Years?

Gaming can be, well, a kind of consumer-unfriendly industry. Players who build and upgrade their own PCs, though, usually expect a level of control over their experience that console gaming may not offer. And anything that changes that is not likely to go over well, as a change to certain Nvidia software is demonstrating. [More]

Mattel, Viacom, Hasbro Accused Of Tracking Kids’ Online Behavior

Mattel, Viacom, Hasbro Accused Of Tracking Kids’ Online Behavior

When your child uses a kid-targeted website for Barbie, Dora the Explorer, Neopets, Nerf, or Nickelodeon, federal law limits what information can be collected. But an investigation by the New York state attorney general found that some of the biggest names in toys and kids’ entertainment were violating that law by collecting information from their young users without authorization, and by allowing third parties to track users’ behavior across the internet. [More]

Louis Abate

Apple, Amazon, Google, Twitter, Dozens More Voice Support For Microsoft Lawsuit Against Justice Dept.

In April, Microsoft sued the U.S. Department of Justice, arguing that its “customers have a right to know when the government obtains a warrant to read their emails,” and that “Microsoft has a right to tell them.” While Microsoft might be the only plaintiff in this case, dozens of tech biggies, media companies, privacy advocates, and others have let the court know that they stand behind Microsoft. [More]

Robert Couse-Baker

Niantic Writes Back To Sen. Al Franken, Says Privacy Concerns Are All Fixed Now

Back in July, when the Pokémon Go fad first hit and users had serious questions about the types of personal data that the location-based game was gobbling, Senator Al Franken of Minnesota decided to step in and add some gravitas to the proceedings. Franken is concerned about privacy and technology and how they intersect in new products like the Oculus Rift or Apple Music. His office sent game-maker Niantic a letter back in mid-July. The company responded, and their response, predictably, is that users shouldn’t have any privacy concerns. [More]