Pilot Who Failed Drug Test Can’t Try To Use DNA To Prove He Was Clean

Steven Depolo

Imagine you’re one of the many American workers subject to random tests for the presence of drugs or alcohol in your system, and a test turns up high levels of heroin and cocaine. If you contend that the lab must have mixed up your urine sample with someone else’s should you be able to demand a DNA test to prove your innocence? If you’re a pilot, the answer is no. [More]

frankieleon

Senate Fails To Approve Bill Allowing FBI Searches Of Web, Phone Records Without Court Order

Earlier this week, in response to the recent massacre of 49 people at Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Senators John McCain of Arizona and Richard Burr of North Carolina introduced a controversial piece of legislation that, if approved, would allow federal law enforcement to perform searches of suspects’ electronic and online records without a traditional court order. However, this morning the Senate narrowly failed to approve the bill. [More]

Uber

Uber Investigator Pretended To Be Reporter To Dig Up Dirt On Lawsuit Plaintiff

Two years ago, Uber was heavily criticized (by basically everyone except investor/sort-of actor Ashton Kutcher) when an executive suggested the company should probe the personal life of a reporter who criticized the ridesharing service. Now Uber has gone from trying to dig up dirt on reporters, to hiring investigators who pretend to be reporters to dig up dirt on a someone suing the company. [More]

Why Is Microsoft Spending $26 Billion To Acquire LinkedIn?

Why Is Microsoft Spending $26 Billion To Acquire LinkedIn?

Microsoft will soon have your resume on file — or at least the resume of a few hundred million LinkedIn members. The two companies announced a deal this morning that would see Microsoft pay $26.2 billion to acquire the job-networking site. [More]

Ciaran McGuiggan

Law Enforcement Agencies Using New Card Reader To Seize Prepaid Card Funds

Millions of unbanked consumers unable to open a traditional bank account have turned to prepaid debit cards in recent years. But now these reloadable, and often untraceable, cards have also become a method of choice for criminals to transport a large amount of cash from one place to another. A new device aims to make it easier for police to seize these ill-gotten funds, but some advocates worry the card scanner could be putting legitimate prepaid card users’ civil rights at risk.  [More]

Adam Fagen

IRS Relaunches “Get Transcript” Online Tool, Promises It’s More Secure

A year after the Internal Revenue Service said hackers used stolen Social Security numbers and other information gleaned from the agency’s system in an attempt to access hundreds of thousands of taxpayers’ accounts, the agency says that the Get Transcript tool at the heart of the attack is back online. [More]

Vileinist

FBI Wants Computers To Scan Your Tattoos To Learn All About You

Law enforcement has long used tattoos as a way to identify people (“The suspect has the name ‘Marge’ on his forearm”), or as an indicator of group membership (“All members of the gang had the same exact tattoo on their forearms”), but the FBI’s in-development tattoo recognition program seeks to create an algorithm to make instant inferences about a person’s behavior based on their tattoos.
[More]

Brad Clinesmith

Popular E-Mail Privacy Bill May Get Unpopular, Privacy-Reducing Amendments In Senate

This week’s episode of “Congress Tries To Cope With The 21st Century” is all about e-mail, and how much privacy yours gets. [More]

Poster Boy

PSA: You Need To Update Your Facebook Privacy Settings Again To Opt Out Of New Targeted Ads

Facebook announced in recent weeks that they’re expanding their advertising empire. With that change, came a stealthy new privacy setting for users — one that all of us are opted-in to by default. [More]

(Mr Seb)

Over 427M Hacked Myspace Passwords Set Loose Online

Okay, okay, we know what you’re thinking: “Myspace?” you scoff, “It’s 2016! I haven’t had a Myspace account since I was a kid! My gosh, what’s next, CompuServe?” [More]

Sam Michel

Is Facebook Trying To Scuttle Facial-Recognition Lawsuit By Changing Illinois Law?

Earlier this month, a federal court gave the go-ahead to a lawsuit alleging that Facebook’s photo-scanning, facial-recognition feature violated Illinois state law. Having lost that legal battle, it looks like Facebook may be trying to get out of the lawsuit by simply changing that Illinois law. [More]

photographybynatalia

Bill Requiring Security Backdoors On Phones & Other Devices Appears To Be DOA

Last month, Senators Diane Feinstein of California and Richard Burr of North Carolina were set to bring forth legislation that would end the debate on whether companies like Apple should help law enforcement unlock users’ devices, by requiring them to do so. In spite of the bipartisan, high-level sponsorship and the spotlight of the disputes between Apple and the Justice Department, it looks like this controversial legislation may never even be formally introduced. [More]

OpenMedia

Privacy Activists Set Up Giant Mobile Billboard Across From Netflix HQ To Protest VPN Blocking

From a business standpoint, it makes sense for Netflix to block VPNs — virtual private networks — to cut down on users accessing its content in foreign countries. But privacy activists who just want to use VPNs to keep their internet connections, well, private, aren’t too pleased with Netflix’s recent blocking campaign. [More]

All Those Smart Devices That Listen To Your House May Be Unlawfully Violating Kids’ Privacy

All Those Smart Devices That Listen To Your House May Be Unlawfully Violating Kids’ Privacy

“The walls have ears” used to be a metaphorical expression. These days, as the era of the Internet of Things dawns and marches on apace, it’s becoming a little more literal every day. And while that’s all well and good for the adults who buy and install a device in their home, it might not be quite so legal for the house to listen to their kids. [More]

The Way You Drive, Not Just Where, Is Yet Another Piece Of Totally Identifiable Personal Data

(Atwater Village Newbie)

“Individuality” does not exactly spring to mind when you’re in the middle of the workday commuter crush, trawling the same roads at the same time as every other 9-5 worker who has to get to work and pick the kids up from school. And yet it turns out that you — yes, you — have a unique way of approaching that commute. So unique, in fact, that it only takes a few minutes of driving data for you to be completely identifiable. [More]

I Know My ID Thief’s Name & Address, But Police Won’t Do Anything About It

Van Swearingen

When you think of an identity thief, you probably envision some squirrelly jerk in a third-world country selling your data on the black market. He’s untraceable and living someplace where the police don’t care. However, that ID thief could be only miles away from you, living an otherwise normal life… in a police where police also don’t really care. [More]

CVS Will End Yard-Long Receipts (For Rewards Program Members)

CVS Will End Yard-Long Receipts (For Rewards Program Members)

Five years ago, a CVS representative explained that the reason why the pharmacy chain keeps printing such long receipts for customers is that customers like it. Maybe the public’s preferences have changed since 2011, since the chain officially announced today that it’s getting rid of the lengthy coupon-filled receipt streamers, and pre-loading coupons to customers’ rewards program cards instead. [More]

Andy Jones

Turns Out It’s Easy To Pinpoint A Grindr User’s Location, Even With Privacy Settings Enabled

Usually when you think of “privacy,” that comprises ideas like, say, other people not knowing who you are, or being able to locate you down to the nearest meter. And yet that last bit seems to have been grossly overlooked by the developers of certain dating and hookup apps, which, it turns out, leak your exact location even if you have location-based services turned off. [More]