frankieleon

States That Expanded Medicaid Hope To Keep It Under Trump Administration

There’s no way to tap-dance around this one: healthcare access is an incredibly politicized and partisan issue in this country. And yet even while our two major political parties disagree vehemently, at every level, about whether existing healthcare laws are effective or worthwhile, at least one part now proving popular in a surprisingly bipartisan way. [More]

Tom Richardson

Net Neutrality, FCC Itself Likely To Face Big Challenges Under Trump Administration

In the two weeks since being named president-elect, Donald Trump has already named a handful of nominees to key positions and expanded his transition team to help determine who should fill in those other spots, and what policies will guide them. Based on the backgrounds of the two men heading up the FCC transition efforts, some of the Commission’s recent efforts will likely be rolled back, and the FCC’s entire role may be reconsidered. [More]

Where Attorney General Nominee Jeff Sessions Comes Down On Consumer Issues

Where Attorney General Nominee Jeff Sessions Comes Down On Consumer Issues

The election may feel like it happened just yesterday, but it’s now ten days behind us, and the building transition to the administration turnover in January is well underway. As part of that, today we learned President-Elect Donald Trump’s top choice for a key role that affects consumers and consumer rights nationwide: he will nominate Sen. Jefferson Sessions of Alabama as Attorney General. [More]

Chris Wilson

From Healthcare To Financial Protection: How Will The Trump White House Affect Consumers?

Elections always bring change; some more so than others. With yesterday’s results in the box and tallied, we now know that we are expecting not only a Trump administration next January, but also to have both houses of Congress and the White House all aligned under control of the same political party. That means that for at least two years, until the next midterm elections, the party in charge — in this case, the Republicans — has the ability to push through changes to policy and law, and we can expect it to do so. [More]

C x 2

The Consumerist Guide To Your 2016 Ballot Initiatives

We’re almost there: at long last, after one of the frankly just-plain weirdest years of news most of us can remember, Election Day is finally drawing nigh nationwide. And while the candidates at the top of the ticket have definitely captured most of the metaphorical air in the national room, there’s far more than just that at stake this year for most voters.

In addition to selecting candidates for dozens of federal, state, and local offices, voters have a wide array of state and local ballot initiatives to choose from this year. Many of those directly address major consumer issues of many kinds. So we’re helping you break those down, with a state-by-state guide. [More]

geetargeek

FCC Delays Vote On Set-Top Box Proposal

After much hullaballoo and a number of eleventh-hour political plays, the FCC has scrapped its plan to vote today on a proposal that would upend the cable set-top box marketplace. [More]

Brad Clinesmith

Ahead Of Tomorrow’s Vote, Several Senators Urge FCC To Approve Set-Top Box Plan

Tomorrow, at its monthly open meeting, the FCC will be voting on the most controversial rule it’s undertaken this year: whether, and how, to let consumers get out of paying their cable company a fee every month for mandatory set-top boxes.

[More]

Ryusaisei

Advocates, Lawmakers, Even Best Buy Call On FCC To Approve Cable Box Plan

The Federal Communications Commission has been stewing over a proposal that would shake up the cable set-top box market for months. They’ve got a vote on the final proposal coming up this week, but in the face of partisan bickering and opposition from the cable industry, the matter has become controversial. So today, a whole passel of folks called on the FCC to approve the measure ASAP, for consumers’ sake.

[More]

inajeep

FCC Explains Cable Set-Top Box Proposal, Everything Else It Does To Senate (Again)

Election years beget a compressed Congressional schedule. The House and Senate just got back to work in D.C. after a six-week break, and will be taking another six-week break as soon as we hit October 1 (picking up again after the election), so everything the committees want to do has to get done now. Like bringing in all five FCC commissioners for another episode of everyone’s favorite series, The FCC Explains And Defends Literally Everything It’s Doing. [More]

Why Queen & George Harrison’s Estate Probably Can’t Sue Over Having Their Songs Played At RNC

Why Queen & George Harrison’s Estate Probably Can’t Sue Over Having Their Songs Played At RNC

Regardless of your political leanings, you’ve probably heard this week that a number of prominent bands were unhappy to find out their music had been used without their permission at the Republican National Convention. However much these artists may not like having their famous tunes used for political purposes, they may not be able to do much about it. [More]

photographynatalia

FCC, Congress Go At It About Pretty Much Everything Once Again

The more the FCC actually tries to create or change regulations around communications companies, the more often chairman Tom Wheeler and the other four commissioners find themselves ordered to Capitol Hill for some kind of hearing. And so today in the continuing series, “The FCC And A Congressional Committee Argue With Each Other,” we learned more about privacy, set-top boxes, and zero-rating.

[More]

Former Presidential Candidate Must Pay $25,000 For Using “Eye Of The Tiger” Without Permission

Former Presidential Candidate Must Pay $25,000 For Using “Eye Of The Tiger” Without Permission

A lot of musicians find out after the fact that one of their songs is being used, without permission, by a politician at rallies and other events, but many of those artists don’t go so far as to actually sue the candidate. However, recently released election records show that the campaign for former presidential candidate Mike Huckabee has agreed to pay $25,000 to settle a lawsuit over its use of Survivor’s 1982 fist-pumper “Eye of the Tiger.” [More]

DoorFrame

FCC-Limiting, Net-Neutrality-Scuttling Bill Passes House

The House of Representatives passed a bill this morning that seeks to limit the FCC’s net neutrality authority and could limit the commission’s ability to investigate consumer complaints about unreasonable charges from and behavior by their ISPs.

[More]

inajeep

White House Promises To Veto Yet Another FCC-Limiting Bill If It Passes

It may seem like Congress never gets anything done, but sometimes they really do! Case in point: a bill, sponsored by lawmakers who are still angry about the FCC’s net neutrality ruling last year, has managed to come out of committee and is scheduled for a House vote. And should the House and Senate both vote on that bill, it will go to the White House… where the president’s top advisors recommend it promptly be vetoed.

[More]

Sigma.DP2.Kiss.X3

Report: New Bill Would Let Judges Order Tech Companies To Break Encryption; White House Not Thrilled

The public fight Apple and the FBI recently had over one particular phone may have resolved itself, but the national discussion over encryption is just warming up. Now there’s a bipartisan effort to make a decision wandering through Congress… but the politics of it say that this particular bill is going to go nowhere fast.

[More]

Congressional Committee Grills FCC About The Way They Do The Things They Do

Congressional Committee Grills FCC About The Way They Do The Things They Do

Agencies like the FCC operate under the auspices of Congress, which has oversight authority. And when an agency like the FCC touches a political third rail — in their case, regulation of powerful communications companies — they can expect to have to answer to Congress. Sometimes repeatedly. And so the FCC found itself on Capitol Hill today, being grilled by a panel of passionate Representatives.

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Apple, FBI Testify About Encryption And Privacy In Congressional Hearing

Apple, FBI Testify About Encryption And Privacy In Congressional Hearing

The angriest battle in tech right now is taking place between Apple and the FBI. Two weeks in to a very public fight, the argument is only heating up. Today, the debate went over to Capitol Hill.

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Senators Once Again Introduce Bill To Try To Stop FCC And Net Neutrality

Senators Once Again Introduce Bill To Try To Stop FCC And Net Neutrality

Since June, 2015, net neutrality — or specifically, the FCC’s Open Internet Rule — has been the law of the land. While the rule is a win for consumers, plenty of businesses and politicians still don’t care for it, to say the least. So while the court challenge against it takes its own sweet time to mosey through the judicial system, opponents are taking another approach. What’s the best way to undo a law you hate? Get a new law.

[More]