Why Is Microsoft Spending $26 Billion To Acquire LinkedIn?

Why Is Microsoft Spending $26 Billion To Acquire LinkedIn?

Microsoft will soon have your resume on file — or at least the resume of a few hundred million LinkedIn members. The two companies announced a deal this morning that would see Microsoft pay $26.2 billion to acquire the job-networking site. [More]

Remember That LinkedIn Breach Back In 2012? It May Have Been Bigger

Remember That LinkedIn Breach Back In 2012? It May Have Been Bigger

Hey, do you remember back in 2012 when hackers hit LinkedIn, stole a few million passwords, and released them online? It was a while ago, so don’t feel bad if you don’t. LinkedIn simply can’t leave the breach behind, though: there are now another 117 million e-mail addresses and passwords for sale on an underground marketplace. [More]

Michael Daddino

Facebook, Reddit, Wells Fargo, Bank Of America CEOs Among Those Urging North Carolina To Repeal New Anti-LGBT Law

Earlier this month, in a hurried legislative process, North Carolina lawmakers passed HB2, a bill that overrides and prevents local governments from establishing anti-discrimination rules against gay and transgender people. This morning, advocacy groups delivered a letter to NC Gov. Pat McCrory signed by top executives from more than 100 companies, all calling for the state to repeal the law. [More]

LinkedIn Jumping Into The Education Business (Kind Of) With $1.5B Purchase Of Lynda.com

LinkedIn Jumping Into The Education Business (Kind Of) With $1.5B Purchase Of Lynda.com

Human resources and professional networking site LinkedIn appears to be broadening its horizons by way of a little education. The company announced today that it struck a deal to buy online career-skills education company lynda.com for about $1.5 billion. [More]

(Effie.Y.)

The Numbers Show Startups Can’t Get Enough Of Calling Themselves The “Uber” For This, The “Airbnb” Of That

If you’ve been hearing startup companies throw around phrases like, “We’re the Uber of [insert industry that is not ride-hailing]!” or “Our service functions just like the Airbnb of [another industry that is not renting out rooms to strangers]!” you’re not alone. A recent analysis of language used by startups to describe their businesses show that a lot of them are hitching their apple carts to those brands’ rising stars.

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LinkedIn Settles Lawsuit Over Poor Password Protection For About $1/Person

LinkedIn Settles Lawsuit Over Poor Password Protection For About $1/Person

Back in 2012, hackers posted a stash of stolen passwords for several million LinkedIn accounts and was quickly sued for failing to protect its users’ information. Now the career-focused networking site has agreed to settle with 800,000 of its premium subscribers, for as little as around one dollar each. [More]

photographybynatalia

LinkedIn Ads Will Now Follow You Around The Web. Here’s How To Opt Out

Because we can’t go anywhere online without some social network tracking our data and using it to cash in on targeted advertising, LinkedIn has created its own online ad network that will allow advertisers to follow you around the web based on the information that LinkedIn knows about you. [More]

LinkedIn Must Pay Employees $6M For Unpaid Overtime

LinkedIn Must Pay Employees $6M For Unpaid Overtime

What happens when a company built on human resources and professional networking doesn’t act so professional? In the case of LinkedIn, the business is ordered to pay employees $6 million for unpaid overtime and damages. [More]

LinkedIn Has To Face User Lawsuit Over E-Mail Privacy Violations, Judge Rules

LinkedIn Has To Face User Lawsuit Over E-Mail Privacy Violations, Judge Rules

We’ve all been there: somebody you knew like eight years ago joins LinkedIn, and the site asks you to go add them as a contact. You ignore the e-mail, because hey, you don’t even remember Bob that well, but LinkedIn doesn’t let it go. It asks you again and again to go add Bob to your network. And by the third message you might well be thinking, “Bob! Stop it! I never want to hear from you again! Go away!” Well, now Bob — and all the real, actual people just like him — can sue LinkedIn about that, a court has ruled.

[More]

Virgin America Setting Up In-Flight Social Networking To Connect Flying Strangers

Virgin America Setting Up In-Flight Social Networking To Connect Flying Strangers

For those of you who not only can’t stand to be separated from some form of social networking for even a second but also have a burning desire to connect with strangers, Virgin America has got just the thing for you. The airline is teaming with a location-aware social app to boost in-flight networking, even with people not currently in the same airplane as you. [More]

Feds To Allow Tech Companies To Provide More Transparent Info On Data Requests

Feds To Allow Tech Companies To Provide More Transparent Info On Data Requests

While a number of the largest websites and telecom companies have recently published transparency data detailing the number of data requests made about consumers, these companies have been very limited with regard to what they could say about federal requests that fall under the header of national security. In response to a call for more transparency from several major Internet businesses, the government is changing its restrictions. [More]

Artist Turns 4.7 Million Hacked LinkedIn Passwords Into 8-Volume Book

Artist Turns 4.7 Million Hacked LinkedIn Passwords Into 8-Volume Book

Remember back in 2012 when someone hacked LinkedIn and revealed that millions of user passwords had been stored in plain-old cleartext? German artist Aram Bartholl has compiled, printed and bound 4.7 million passwords into “Forgot Your Password?,” an eight-volume set that visitors to next month’s Unpainted media art fair in Munich will be able to thumb through. [via Boing Boing]

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Ginormous Hack Targets 2 Million Accounts Spread Over 93,000 Websites Worldwide

Ginormous Hack Targets 2 Million Accounts Spread Over 93,000 Websites Worldwide

About two million people should be checking your social media accounts and anything else one might have a login and password for: Hackers have snagged usernames and passwords for millions of Facebook, Google, Twitter, Yahoo and other sites accounts, according to a new report. [More]

Google Mocks Opacity Of National Security Requests While Feds Try To Hide Court Action From Public

In a transparency report from last year, Google thumbed its nose at the federal laws that limit what can be said about national security requests.

For quite some time, Google and other Internet biggies have argued that they should be able to reveal relatively detailed data to the public about user-information requests from federal law enforcement agencies, and specifically those that fall under that black umbrella of national security. In its latest transparency report, Google uses a visual to show its distaste for this opacity. Meanwhile, the federal government is attempting to argue its case for the lack of transparency behind doors closed so tight that even the others involved in the request won’t be privy to what’s said. [More]

You Can Make Your LinkedIn Profile Stalker-Proof, But Then You Might As Well Not Have A Profile

You Can Make Your LinkedIn Profile Stalker-Proof, But Then You Might As Well Not Have A Profile

On Facebook, you can make your profile very private so that no one outside of your network can see anything other than your name. You can also block individuals from contacting you. Twitter allows you to make your feed private so that you pick and choose who can follow your Tweets. Meanwhile, LinkedIn allows you to limit who can see your profile, but does not give you the ability to block individuals, so it’s kind of an all or nothing. [More]

Graphic: Which Internet Biggies Are Even Slightly Concerned About Your Privacy?

Graphic: Which Internet Biggies Are Even Slightly Concerned About Your Privacy?

When it comes to online privacy, many consumers assume that their service provider, or the websites they are browsing, have the users’ best interest in mind and that these companies won’t simply hand over your information to authorities. These people are mistaken, as are those who believe that no online companies make user privacy a priority. The truth, as usual, is a bit from column A and a bit from column B. [More]