Senators Introduce Bill To Ban Mandatory Binding Arbitration Clauses In Cellphone Contracts

Senators Introduce Bill To Ban Mandatory Binding Arbitration Clauses In Cellphone Contracts

When you buy a new cellphone you have to sign a contract where you give up your right to sue. You agree to what’s called, “mandatory binding arbitration.” This is a bad thing to give to an industry that has high levels of complaints about hidden fees and abusive anti-consumer practices. Because if their crummy customer service fails to remedy an issue, your last resort option is to participate in a kangaroo court system that is paid for out of fees paid by the cellphone companies themselves. So Senators Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) and Al Franken (D-MN) have today introduced The Consumer Mobile Fairness Act that would ban mandatory arbitration clauses in cellphone contracts.

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"Guess The Next Cashier To Be Fired!" Contest Not Good Morale Booster For Cashiers

"Guess The Next Cashier To Be Fired!" Contest Not Good Morale Booster For Cashiers

A judge has ruled that the “guess the next cashier who will be fired” “contest” concocted by a convenience store manager created a hostile work environment. Several of the employees left after it and the judge ruled that their unemployment claims could not be dismissed on the basis of the workers leaving voluntarily. Here is the text of the kooky contest memo:

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Bill Introduced To Let Robots Call Your Cellphone

Bill Introduced To Let Robots Call Your Cellphone

Since ’91, it’s been illegal for telemarketers to use autodialers and other robot-like devices to call your cellphone. Last week, a bill was introduced to change that. While in the past email hoaxes have gone around saying that your cellphone could be opened up to telemarketers, HR 3035 seeks to let businesses contact your cellphone “for informational purposes.”

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SEC Warns S&P It May Sue Them

SEC Warns S&P It May Sue Them

In an unprecedented move, the SEC warned S&P that it might be suing it over its rating of a mortgage-backed bond. It’s the first warning a credit rating firm has gotten over its behavior leading up to the financial crisis.

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Berliner Suckered Into Paying $680 For Free Government Forms

Berliner Suckered Into Paying $680 For Free Government Forms

A woman from Berlin Googled for US citizenship application info and thought the site she landed on was an all-in-one place for taking care of all her forms. She forked over $680, and what she got back were forms she could have gotten from the government for free.

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Despite Their Protests, Airlines Are Indeed Liable For Lost Luggage

Despite Their Protests, Airlines Are Indeed Liable For Lost Luggage

Many airlines have inserted “checked baggage limitations of liability” into their contracts which try to act like it’s not their fault if jewelry or gadgets somehow go missing during transit from your luggage. They’re bunkum.

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Landlord Refuses To Rent To Single Mother Because There's No Man "To Shovel The Snow"

Landlord Refuses To Rent To Single Mother Because There's No Man "To Shovel The Snow"

A Wisconsin landlord has been sued by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development after refusing to rent a property to a single mother. The landlord, who is a woman, said it was because the renter didn’t have a man “to shovel the snow.”

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Get $500 Each Time Sprint Called You After You Said
Stop

Get $500 Each Time Sprint Called You After You Said Stop

If Sprint telemarketed you after you told them not to call you again, you could get $500 for each time they rang you up, thanks to a recent class action settlement.

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How A Wall Street Lobbyist Is "Reforming The Reform"

How A Wall Street Lobbyist Is "Reforming The Reform"

Banks are none too happy about how the passage of Dodd-Frank has been crimping their style. So they hired a Wall Street lobbyist, former Congressman Steve Bartlett, to lead the well-funded rearguard action by the ” Financial Services Roundtable” to neuter the laws. And darned if those cocktail parties aren’t working.

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Bank Of America Paying Out $410 Million For Reordering Your Transactions To Maximize Overdraft Fees

Bank Of America Paying Out $410 Million For Reordering Your Transactions To Maximize Overdraft Fees

What makes this Bank of America $410 million class action settlement special is that it’s over a basic consumer banking business practice. For years, banks have been processing your daily transactions in order from highest to lowest, rather than real-time. They say they’re doing us a favor so that if we have a check bounce, it’s the one for the babysitter and not the mortgage payment. But this class action suit claims that Bank of America did this to unjustly enrich itself. It’s one of over 60 lawsuits against various banks for similar practices, and it could reshape the entire industry.

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Convicted Bank Fraudster Could Get 385-Year Sentence

Convicted Bank Fraudster Could Get 385-Year Sentence

Prosecutors in the case against Lee Farkas, who was convicted of leading a $2.9 billion scheme that wrecked Taylor, Bean & Whitaker Mortgage Corp., have asked the judge in the case to sentence Farkas to at least 50-years in prison, adding that the maximum sentence for his crime is 385 years.

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Mom Sues Four Loko For Teen's Death

Mom Sues Four Loko For Teen's Death

The parents of a teen who died after drinking two Four Lokos and running onto a highway have sued the beverage maker, reports the Chicago Tribune. The lawsuit claims the manufacturer was “careless and negligent” in making a caffeinated alcoholic drink that “desensitizes users to the symptoms of intoxication and increases the potential for alcohol-related harm.”

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College Kid Is Pro At Taking Companies To Small Claims Court

College Kid Is Pro At Taking Companies To Small Claims Court

Most of us have trouble scratching a simple customer service call off our to-do list, but The Red Tape Chronicles profiles a college kid who has turned taking companies to small claims court into a bit of a hobby. And he’s won 10 out of 12 times.

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Telemarketer Won't Show "Do Not Call" Policy? You Can Sue For $500

Telemarketer Won't Show "Do Not Call" Policy? You Can Sue For $500

If you can’t get rid of annoying telemarketers, you can at least make a profit off them. Under Federal law, they have to give you a written copy of their “Do Not Call” policy for free if you ask them to. If they don’t, you can take them to court and sue them for a cool statutory $500. Here’s a sample script for doing this from a guy who has sued several telemarketers over this violation and won.

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Jehovah's Witness's Suit Over Being Fired For Refusing To Wear Santa Hat Reaches $55,000 Settlement

Jehovah's Witness's Suit Over Being Fired For Refusing To Wear Santa Hat Reaches $55,000 Settlement

A woman who says the Belk department store fired her after she refused to wear a Santa hat during Christmas has won a in a $55,000 suit against the company, reports the News & Observer. The worker was a Jehovah’s Witness, and said her religious beliefs prevented her from wearing such a cap. However, she had no problem with fulfilling her job, which was to wrap presents. For Belk to have won, they would have had to have proved that letting her not wear the cap would cause them “undue hardship.” Apparently, they were not able to meet this requirement.

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Bill Introduced To Delay Swipe Fee Reform

Bill Introduced To Delay Swipe Fee Reform

Bills were introduced in both the House and Senate to delay “swipe fee reform” by at least a year and they call for a study of its potential effects. The new rules, scheduled to take effect July 21, would cap the fee banks can charge merchants for processing debit card fees at 12 cents per transaction.

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Disabled Janitor's $311,000 Victory Against Abusive Firm Trying To Collect $3,800 Debt

Disabled Janitor's $311,000 Victory Against Abusive Firm Trying To Collect $3,800 Debt

They just wouldn’t stop calling, and now they have to pay. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has upheld a ruling that a debt collection firm will have to pay a former janitor suffering from a head injury $311,000. Quite a turn of events, considering the debt they were hounding him on was only about $3,800.

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Is The 30-Year Mortgage On Death Row?

Is The 30-Year Mortgage On Death Row?

Plans are in the works to dismantle Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, and that could mean that what many Americans had assumed came fourth after “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness,” the 30-year mortgage, could be on the outs.

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