IKEA To Pay $50M To Families Of 3 Toddlers Killed In Dresser Tip-Overs

IKEA To Pay $50M To Families Of 3 Toddlers Killed In Dresser Tip-Overs

Six months after IKEA and the Consumer Product Safety Commission announced the recall of more than 29 million topple-prone Malm dressers now linked to four deaths, the furniture maker has agreed to pay $50 million to three of the affected families. [More]

Faux Fish Company Ordered To Stop Using “Chickpea Of The Sea” Name

Faux Fish Company Ordered To Stop Using “Chickpea Of The Sea” Name

As more and more companies jump on the fake meat bandwagon, producing meatless burgers that bleed and now “vegan sushi” meant to mimic the experience of eating fish, it isn’t just consumers that are paying attention: established names in the meat industry are on the lookout for imitators, and ready to protect their trademarks. [More]

AmandaSG

Labor Dept. Tries To Revive Overtime Rule Derided By Trump’s Pick For Labor Secretary

In November, with only days to go before a new federal overtime rule was set to kick in — adding an estimated 4 million American works to the list of those eligible to receive overtime pay — a federal court granted a nationwide injunction blocking the new rule from being enforced. Now Labor Secretary Thomas Perez is appealing that injunction, even though his successor under the incoming Trump administration will almost certainly drop that appeal once in office. [More]

20 States Accuse Teva, Mylan & Other Pharma Companies Of Price-Fixing

When the Justice Department announced it was bringing criminal charges against two former executives of a pharmaceuticals company, alleging a conspiracy to fix prices on generic drugs, we said that this was likely just the tip of the legal iceberg. Today, the industry ran smack into that iceberg — in the form of a lawsuit filed by twenty states against six different drug companies, including notables like Teva and Mylan. [More]

Customer Sues Over Citric Acid In “Preservative-Free” Lean Cuisine Pizza

Customer Sues Over Citric Acid In “Preservative-Free” Lean Cuisine Pizza

“Preservative-free” is a food label that plenty of shoppers seek out, and it’s printed right on the front of Lean Cuisine’s boxes of frozen pizza. One customer claims, however, that this label isn’t accurate. Whether she’s right depends on whether citric acid — a chemical that serves different purposes in different kinds of food — is considered a “preservative.” [More]

Ashley Madison’s Penalty For Exposing Details On 36 Million Users? About $.04 Per Person

Ashley Madison’s Penalty For Exposing Details On 36 Million Users? About $.04 Per Person

In 2015, a major data breach at AshleyMadison.com — the dating site targeted at cheaters — exposed information for some 36 million accounts. The company has now entered into a deal that settles federal and state charges that Ashley Madison: misled users about data security and failed to protect user information; charged users to delete profiles (but didn’t); and used fake profiles to lure in customers. While the settlement has a price tag of $8.75 million, Ashley Madison will actually pay significantly less than that. [More]

Great Beyond

A new federal law will be born today. If it is signed by President Obama, one of his final acts in office will be to enshrine into law one of the core principles on which Consumerist — now in its eleventh year — was founded: That honest consumers have the right to complain. [More]

“Security As An Afterthought:” 3 Frightening Privacy Claims From Former Uber Staffers

Even if you’re a fan of Uber’s service, it’s often difficult to not take issue with the company’s short history of: disregarding taxi regulations, having questionable screening procedures for drivers, taking a casual approach to customer privacy, and forbidding both its employees and users from bringing lawsuits. Now, several former Uber security staffers are pulling back the veil on what they see as problems at the hugely popular ridesharing service. [More]

Google

Even though collegiate athletes brings in untold fortunes for schools, TV networks, merchandise makers, ticket vendors, and the hospitality and travel industries, they are not — according to a federal appeals court — employees of their schools and are therefore not entitled to be paid anything. [More]

Robert Mooney

Android Phone Maker Accused Of Knowingly Selling Phones Loaded With Spyware

Some especially sneaky spyware, which takes all of a user’s messages and browsing data and quietly ships it to servers in China, was recently discovered on some inexpensive Android devices sold in this country. Two customers who own the offending phones have filed a class action against the company that sold them here in the United States, on behalf of the buyers of at least 120,000 devices. [More]

JetBlue Asks Court To Throw Out Lawsuit Over Misplaced 5-Year-Old

JetBlue Asks Court To Throw Out Lawsuit Over Misplaced 5-Year-Old

More than three months after losing track of an unaccompanied minor and sending him to an airport in an entirely different city than his intended destination, JetBlue is arguing that an international treaty prohibits the mother from bringing a lawsuit against the airline. [More]

afagen

Supreme Court Overturns $399M Verdict In Long-Running Apple/Samsung Patent Spat

The seemingly never-ending smartphone patent slapfight between Apple and Samsung continues on, with the U.S. Supreme Court ruling today that a $399 million jury award granted to Apple needs to be reassessed because the iPhone maker isn’t entitled to all of the profits from the infringing Samsung devices. [More]

Open Grid Scheduler / Grid Engine

Airbnb Won’t Be Held Liable For Law-Breaking Listings In NYC

Back in October, the state of New York passed a new law specifically aimed at micro-hoteliers who rent out one or more New York City apartments to tourists. Airbnb immediately sued the state and the city over how the law will be enforced, and now the case has been settled. [More]

frankieleon

Intoxicated Best Buy Worker Can’t Hold Store Liable For Letting Him Drive Home, Crash His Car

If you show up to work so overly medicated that you won’t remember it the next day, it’s pretty likely that your employer is going to notice and send you home (and maybe tell you to never come back), but if you wreck your car on the way home, can you hold your employer responsible for letting you drive away? [More]

Phil Hart

Feds Appeal Order That Halted Expansion Of Overtime Pay To Millions

This morning, around 4 million Americans would have gone to work, eligible to collect overtime pay that they hadn’t previously been entitled to receive. However, last week a federal court judge halted the new rule that would have expanded this overtime coverage. Even with a new administration coming into the White House in about seven weeks, the Justice Department has announced its intention to appeal this ruling. [More]