Taber Andrew Bain

Senators To Wells Fargo CEO: Don’t Strip Wronged Customers Of Their Day In Court

Now that Wells Fargo is in the hot seat for allegedly pushing its employees to meet sales goals and quotas by opening millions of bogus accounts in customers’ names, will the bank use the anti-consumer terms of its customer contracts to get out of the inevitable class action lawsuits? A coalition of U.S. senators have written the bank’s CEO asking him to please not strip customers’ of their day in court. [More]

C x 2

AT&T Taking Nashville To Court To Try To Slow Down Google Fiber

They said they’d do it, and so, by gum, they’re doing it: Surprising basically nobody, AT&T has filed a lawsuit against the city of Nashville and its officials, seeking to block a recently-passed law that would make it possible for Google Fiber to come to town. [More]

Minnesota Vikings Let Wells Fargo Keep “Photobombing” Rooftop Signs After All

Minnesota Vikings Let Wells Fargo Keep “Photobombing” Rooftop Signs After All

Maybe the Minnesota Vikings are feeling generous after a 2-0 start, but the NFL team is reportedly going to allow Wells Fargo to keep the two rooftop signs the bank allegedly erected to “photobomb” the Vikes’ new stadium — even though a court already ordered Wells to remove the signs. [More]

News Organizations Sue FBI To Find Out Who & How Much It Paid To Unlock Terrorist’s iPhone

News Organizations Sue FBI To Find Out Who & How Much It Paid To Unlock Terrorist’s iPhone

In the months following the tragic Dec. 2, 2015 terrorist attack in San Bernardino, the FBI and Apple engaged in a heated legal (and publicity) battle over whether or not the tech giant could be compelled to unlock an iPhone belonging to one of the attackers. Then in March 2016, the FBI paid an unidentified third party to provide a solution this particular problem. The identity and actual cost of this unlocking is still unknown, but two of the country’s biggest media companies have sued the FBI to learn more. [More]

Consumers Suing Welspun Over Egyptian Cotton Bedding Made With Inferior Materials

Consumers Suing Welspun Over Egyptian Cotton Bedding Made With Inferior Materials

There’s more bad news for textile manufacturer Welpsun: after Target cut ties with the company, and Walmart pulled its sheets from shelves, U.S. consumers have filed two lawsuits claiming the textile manufacturer fraudulently labeled its bedding as premium Egyptian cotton when it was in fact made from lower quality fibers. [More]

Tesla on YouTube

Tesla Claims Man With Pals In Big Oil Tried To Impersonate Elon Musk

It sounds like an obvious plot in a movie: a man working for Big Oil tries to steal secrets from an electric car company by impersonating its CEO to steal financial secrets! Except it really happened, according to a new lawsuit from Tesla Motors that claims someone pretended to be Elon Musk in a bid to get juicy inside information. [More]

Beverage Industry Takes Philadelphia To Court Over Soda Tax

Mike Mozart

A few months back, the city of Philadelphia became just the second city in the U.S. to successfully pass a tax specifically on soft drinks, adding $.015/ounce to the price a distributor pays for sodas — including diet drinks — and other sweetened beverages. As expected, the beverage industry has fired back with a lawsuit challenging this tax, alleging that it illegally duplicates a state tax and diminishes the purchasing power of low-income Philadelphia residents. [More]

Josh Bassett

Lawsuit: Chipotle Worker Fired After Complaining That Coworkers Got Preferential Treatment

A new lawsuit filed in California claims that a former Chipotle worker was fired after she complained to her bosses that her coworkers were receiving preferential treatment, giving them coveted daytime shifts while she was stuck working at nighttime. [More]

No, Yelp’s Star Ratings Don’t Make It Liable For Bad Reviews

No, Yelp’s Star Ratings Don’t Make It Liable For Bad Reviews

Federal law generally protects websites from liability for content posted by third parties, otherwise online review platforms like Yelp would need to vet every single review before it gets published. But a small-business owner in Washington believes Yelp is liable because of its star ratings and because Yelp reviews can end up on Google search results. [More]

House Passes Bill Outlawing “Gag Clauses” That Try To Punish Customers For Writing Negative Reviews

Jennifer Moo

We’re nearing the finish line for a piece of legislation that will make it illegal for companies to put so-called “gag orders” in their customer contracts to prevent consumers from sharing their honest opinions with the rest of the world. [More]

Mike Mozart

Woman Stuck By Needle In Target Parking Lot Awarded $4.6M

More than two years after a woman was pricked by a hypodermic needle her daughter picked up in a Target parking lot, a jury has awarded her more than $4.6 million. [More]

Mom Says College Stole Her ID, Forged Signature To Take Out Student Loan For Son Who Didn’t Attend School

Mom Says College Stole Her ID, Forged Signature To Take Out Student Loan For Son Who Didn’t Attend School

A for-profit educator that was recently hit with a $13 million settlement for allegedly filing false claims for student aid is now accused of stealing an Alabama woman’s identity and forging her signature to take out a student loan for her son, even though he never attended that school. [More]

Judges In Subway “Foot-Long Fraud” Appeal Ask Why Case Wasn’t Thrown Out Long Ago

Judges In Subway “Foot-Long Fraud” Appeal Ask Why Case Wasn’t Thrown Out Long Ago

More than three years after an Australian teen’s photo of a shorter-than-a-foot Subway sandwich kicked off a series of lawsuits against the fast food chain — and nearly a year after those suits were settled — the matter is still pending before a federal appeals court. Not because the plaintiffs are asking for more or Subway is trying to wriggle out of the deal, but because a third party is saying the case was so frivolous there should have been no settlement at all. [More]

Big Dairy Settles Claim It Killed Cows To Keep Milk Prices Up; Are You Due A Piece Of $52M?

Adam Fagen

What’s one way to keep milk prices from going down? Cut down on the number of cows producing that milk. An dairy industry group representing around 70% of the milk we buy has agreed to pay $52 million to settle an antitrust complaint alleging that industry illegally inflated milk prices by paying farmers to slaughter cows prematurely. [More]

Appeals Court: Sorry Uber Drivers, You Signed Away Your Right To Sue Company

Uber

Just like a growing number of companies are quietly stripping consumers of their right to a jury trial, so too are employers using workers’ contracts to insert clauses that prevent them from bringing lawsuits in court. Yesterday, a federal appeals court ruled that most Uber drivers signed away their rights to pursue legal action against the company, putting multiple lawsuits — and a potential $100 million class action settlement — at risk. [More]

Lawyer: Employers Should Take Away Workers’ Right To Sue; Arbitrators “Know Where Their Bread & Butter Comes From”

SarahMcGowen

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is currently working on rules to stop banks, credit card issuers, and others from forcing customers to sign away their right to a jury trial. Opponents claim that this change will only benefit trial lawyers, but some candid advice from one lawyer shows exactly why these protections are needed — and who really stands to benefit. [More]

Ken Shelton

Airbnb Says City’s Ban On Short-Term Rentals Violates Federal Law, Constitution

In May 2015, the California city of Santa Monica — the one with the famous pier that’s in just about every beach movie ever made — revised its laws to effectively bar most Airbnb rentals. Now the online home-sharing platform is accusing the city of violating the Constitution and multiple federal laws. [More]

(paul bica)

GM Settles Two Ignition Switch Injury Lawsuits

Nearly two years after General Motors’ decades-long ignition switch defect came to light, the automaker continues to face hundreds of lawsuits. However, the company recently settled a pair of complaints that could set the tone for future litigation. [More]