INVESTIGATIONS

Nicholas Eckhart

Arby’s Admits Malware Infection And Credit Card Breach At Hundreds Of Restaurants

The last time you satisfied your craving for seasoned curly fries at Arby’s, did you use a credit or debit card? It’s time to start watching your statements for fraudulent transactions and also to watch your mailbox for a new card: Arby’s announced a payment card breach at a few hundred of its restaurants. [More]

Phillip Bradshaw

FTC Opens Antitrust Investigation Of Mylan Over EpiPen’s Market Dominance

The EpiPen was a perfect symbol of the current state of pharmaceutical companies and health care expenses: It was a life-saving drug that had been around for decades, often used by children, and with a price that kept rising. The controversy over the epinephrine injectors led to news stories, a Congressional hearing, a $465 million settlement for overcharging Medicaid, and investigations by the states of New York and West Virginia.

[More]

Feds: No Proof That ‘Breathometer’ Blood Alcohol Content Test Actually Works

Feds: No Proof That ‘Breathometer’ Blood Alcohol Content Test Actually Works

The Breathometer promised to be a pocket-sized law-enforcement-grade device that could be used to accurately measure blood alcohol levels to determine if the user is sober enough to drive. It’s a good enough idea that it won over the panel on Shark Tank, but according to federal regulators, the only thing you can definitely say about this device is that it does fit in your pocket. [More]

inajeep

Senators Question Comcast, Charter About “Broadcast TV” & “Regional Sports” Fees

The 115th Congress only just came into town and got properly sworn in and down to business on Tuesday, but returning members aren’t wasting any time picking their favorite projects back up. And so, only a few days into the new year, a pair of senators are turning on Charter and Comcast to ask what, exactly, those two think they’re doing with their pricing schemes. [More]

SoCal Metro

Holiday Inn Owner InterContinental Hotels Investigating Possible Credit Card Breach

The Intercontinental Hotels Group — parent company to a number of hotel chains, including Holiday Inn and Holiday Inn Express — is investigating a possible breach of customers’ payment card data. [More]

FTC Investigating Ashley Madison, New CEO Confirms

FTC Investigating Ashley Madison, New CEO Confirms

The hack that leaked 30 million customers’ data all over the internet may be a year in the past, but things are still rough for intentional-infidelity dating site Ashley Madison, which now finds itself the target of a federal probe.

[More]

poppet with a camera

Dole Found Listeria In Salad Processing Plant As Far Back As 2014, Kept Shipping Veggies

Is it a crime for a company or its representatives to keep on shipping food products that may be dangerous to the public if they know that the items may be contaminated? Dole’s Springfield, OH processing plant has started shipping salad again, but new evidence shows that the company kept shipping lettuce even as it was aware of Listeria contamination in the building as far back as 2014. [More]

poppet with a camera

Dole Restarts Production At Salad Facility That Had 9-Month Listeria Outbreak

Back in January, the state of Ohio and federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention discovered and investigated Listeria contamination in salad greens that came from a Dole processing plant in Springfield, OH. The plant has been closed since January, and Dole started limited production this week, but the company announced exactly what the source of contamination was or how they were able to eradicate it. [More]

Police Investigating Death During Walmart Shoplifting Incident

Police Investigating Death During Walmart Shoplifting Incident

Early on Sunday morning, a 62-year-old man piled DVDs worth $380.74 in a shopping cart at a Florida Walmart and headed for the door. When he couldn’t produce a receipt for the greeter, he ran out the door, and employees followed him. He collapsed and was resuscitated, but died in the hospital 12 hours later. [More]

New Student Aid Enforcement Unit Created To Address Alleged Fraud At For-Profit Colleges

New Student Aid Enforcement Unit Created To Address Alleged Fraud At For-Profit Colleges

With thousands of former Corinthian Colleges students waiting to find out if their federal student loan debts will be discharged because the now-defunct for-profit college allegedly deceived them with false promises related to their future careers, the Department of Education announced the creation of a special enforcement unit with the goal of being able to respond quickly to allegations that colleges are violating the law. [More]

(Frontline)

7 Things You Need To Know From Frontline’s Investigation On Supplements & Safety

They look like drugs, they’re regulated by the Food and Drug Administration, but Frontline‘s new investigation found that supplements are very, very different. [More]

(Jeffrey Beall)

Colorado Investigating Scammers Who Hoard DMV Appointments, Sell Them To Undocumented Residents

When something is free, but it’ll take a long time to get it, there’s always the chance that someone will try to take advantage of the situation to make a profit off impatient people. In Colorado, the attorney general’s office is investigating a scalping scheme that involves scammers hoarding driver’s license appointments with the Department of Motor Vehicles, then turning around and selling them to undocumented residents. [More]

(Scott Lynch)

10 States Investigating Movie Theater Chains Over Antitrust Violations

You know how it’s almost impossible to ever see one of those big blockbuster films showing at the little movie theater down the street? That issue is largely the result of exclusive agreements between large theater chains and film studios that effectively prevent independent rivals from showing certain films. While these deals might be great for the bigger companies, they aren’t so awesome for consumers. And so, 10 state attorneys general are looking into whether or not the contracts used by Regal Cinemas, AMC Entertainment, and Cinemark constitute antitrust violations.  [More]

(jayRaz)

Anheuser-Busch Distributor Incentive Program Raises More Concerns Of A Stifled Craft Beer Market

With its $107 billion merger with SABMiller making waves and federal regulators investigating its purchase of several small distributors, one might think that Anheuser-Busch InBev would lay low when it comes to rocking the distribution boat. But that’s apparently not the case, as the company recently unveiled an incentive program that would provide distributors with a sliding scale of bonuses if most of the beer they sell comes from the brewer.   [More]

Subprime Credit Reporting Company To Pay $8M For Illegally Obtaining Consumers’ Credit Info

Subprime Credit Reporting Company To Pay $8M For Illegally Obtaining Consumers’ Credit Info

Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act, companies – and lenders – are allowed to access credit reports only for “permissible purposes,” like determining if a person is creditworthy. But federal regulators say a Florida-based subprime credit reporting company illegally obtained tens of thousands of consumers’ credit reports for use in marketing materials for potential clients, including payday lenders.

[More]

(eren {sea+prairie})

Nestle Investigation Results: Yep, Your Cat’s Food May Have Been Caught By Slaves

In a series of recent lawsuits, consumers have taken issue with the treatment of workers on fishing boats from Thailand that work far out to sea. The issue got consumers’ attention after reports from non-governmental organizations and a New York Times investigative series this summer, and companies that buy and sell fish conducted their own investigations. Nestle has now concluded theirs, and admits that yep, there were vendors who severely mistreated along their supply chain. [More]

Feds Once Again Increase Scrutiny Of Allegiant Airlines After Repairs For Unsecured Bolts

Feds Once Again Increase Scrutiny Of Allegiant Airlines After Repairs For Unsecured Bolts

When an Allegiant Airlines flight from Las Vegas to Peoria was speeding down the runway and the nose lifted too soon, pilots aborted the takeoff. That August incident – in which a bolt was found to be insecure – led the budget carrier to inspect all of its aircraft. While the company deemed its planes were in working order, a new report suggests that might not be the case.  [More]