IBM & Visa Team Up To Turn Everything Into A Mobile Payment System

IBM & Visa Team Up To Turn Everything Into A Mobile Payment System

Consumers make millions of purchases each year through their phones with systems like Apple Pay, PayPal, Samsung Pay, and other programs. But soon, people might be able to use any number of other connected devices to buy products or pay for services, as IBM and Visa announced a partnership to bring payment systems to a number of “smart” products.  [More]

Mr Seb

Hackers Use College’s Connected Vending Machines To Attack Network

What do you get when you combine Internet of Things devices, an overworked network, and an over abundance of seafood-related domain searches? A university attacked by its own malware-infected connected devices. [More]

Al Ibrahim

Don’t Want Your TV To Report Back Everything You Watch? Here’s How To Turn That Off

Vizio got busted early this week for spying on users and sharing their data without permission. But the key there is the “without permission” part, because pretty much all smart TVs are collecting and sharing some kind of data on you. And so many consumers are now asking: Can I make them stop? [More]

Mateus André

Raising a baby can be pretty nerve-wracking, especially for first-time parents. Babies make weird sounds, do bizarre things, and can’t describe when something’s actually wrong. Meanwhile, it’s 2017 and our solution to basically every old problem is: “Have you tried throwing new technology at it?” [More]

andy_57

If You Have An Original iPhone, It Won’t Work On AT&T Anymore

It’s unlikely that anyone other than the most stubborn users are still using the original iPhone or feature phones from the era of 2G networks, but AT&T has announced that it has finally cut these users off. [More]

Eric Hauser

Samsung “Smart” Camera Is Ridiculously Hackable

A security camera in your house, that you can access remotely, might seem like a good idea at first. You can log into it from anywhere, to see what’s going on and if it really was the cat who opened your kitchen cabinets every day last week. But the problem with a thing you can access remotely is that a sufficiently determined bad actor can, too. And sometimes it doesn’t even take much determination to do. [More]

Flyinace2000

Got An Idea On How To Make ‘Internet Of Things’ More Secure? You Could Win $25,000

Internet-connected (“smart”) devices are becoming ubiquitous, but they have this persistent problem: they’re internet-connected. A huge number are extremely vulnerable to being taken over by bad actors, for a whole host of reasons. And so, before your fridge becomes part of the next record-breaking botnet, the Federal Trade Commission wants to give someone cold, hard, cash money for coming up with a way to prevent it. [More]

Mr Seb

Senator Asks Federal Agencies For Information On Massive Internet Of Things Breach

A massive denial of service attack last week has already resulted in the recall of a number of webcams that may have been used to aid hackers in taking popular sites like Twitter, Github, Reddit, and others offline throughout the day. Now, lawmakers are asking federal agencies what else can be done to prevent future attacks. [More]

Mr. Seb

Millions Of Hijacked “Smart” Devices Already Aiding Criminals, Research Finds

Ever since “smart,” connected devices began to form the internet of things a few years back, some experts have warned that we could be facing a future where your toaster, washing machine, and TV become part of a sophisticated botnet used to attack others. Well, those experts say, the future is now. [More]

Google Launching Home AI Competitor To “Accidental Winner” Amazon Echo This Week

Google Launching Home AI Competitor To “Accidental Winner” Amazon Echo This Week

If growing up on Star Trek: The Next Generation reruns taught us anything, it’s that the future would be brought to us by computers that could recognize our voice commands and do whatever we asked. And while none of the products on the market today sound like the late Majel Barrett-Roddenberry, we are still surrounded by machine-generated female voices that answer our questions, queue up our favorite tunes, and dim our room lights on request. But the dominant player in that space is one that, just a few years ago, nobody would have expected — because it’s Amazon, not Google, connecting homes.

[More]

frankieleon

TCP Disconnects “Smart” Lightbulb Servers, Leaves Buyers In The Dark

This is, unfortunately, becoming one of the most predictable stories of the early 21st century. It goes something like this: new tech product comes on the market. Consumers, finding product solves their problem, eagerly buy. Then the company that made the product turns off the server that made the thing “smart,” and suddenly early adopters are up a creek with no recourse.

[More]

SirMo76

Sprint’s Parent Company Spending $32 Billion To Buy A Piece Of Everyone’s Phones

A big tech deal was announced between two international companies today. Japan-based SoftBank bought UK-based ARM for $32 billion, a sentence that’s meaningless to most of us. But put another way, it starts to make a whole lot more sense: the company that owns Sprint just bought the company that makes the parts that make your iPhone actually work.

[More]

Tsvetomir Tsonev

Bluetooth-Enabled Pregnancy Tests Are Now On The Market

Is there any everyday item that wouldn’t benefit from adding some electronic components and Bluetooth connectivity? Of course not! That’s why you can now buy, in actual stores, a pregnancy test with Bluetooth connectivity. This is apparently because Millennial women are in their peak child-having years, and are incapable of sitting for three minutes without syncing our smartphones to something. [More]

Nest May Compensate Revolv Users Who Will Own $300 Paperweights As Of May 15

Nest May Compensate Revolv Users Who Will Own $300 Paperweights As Of May 15

There’s a serious problem with “smart” devices that can power items in your home: many of them are designed so that they only work with their creators’ cloud service. That’s fine, as long as your internet access is reliable and the company doesn’t go out of business or decide to shut off the servers where those cloud services run. Unlike Nest, companies should probably anticipate that some users might be a bit upset about this. [More]

Your Home Router Was Probably Out-Of-Date And Insecure Before You Even Plugged It In

Your Home Router Was Probably Out-Of-Date And Insecure Before You Even Plugged It In

Here’s some depressing news for your morning: even if you set up your home network yourself and followed all of the best practices for doing so, it’s probably got some big fat vulnerabilities in it.

[More]

Internet-Connected Video Baby Monitors Are Basically The Most Hackable, Least Secure Thing Ever

Internet-Connected Video Baby Monitors Are Basically The Most Hackable, Least Secure Thing Ever

The implacable march of technology has, in many ways, made parents’ lives easier. But in other areas, it’s added a whole new layer of complication. Like the fact that video-enabled baby monitors, designed to let parents have peace of mind while their kids are sleeping in another room, almost universally have completely crap security that any random stranger on the internet can tap into.

[More]

(jayRaz)

Hackers Can Now Remotely Attack A Gun, Change Its Target, And Lock The Owner Out

Over the past few years we’ve heard a lot about the smart, connected devices that make up the internet of things. From ceiling fans to cars and cameras, they’re everywhere. Unfortunately, anything that can connect to the internet can be hacked through the internet… and now, it seems, that includes guns.

[More]

(funny strange or funny ha ha)

Because Technology Isn’t Going Away, FTC Creates Division Dedicated To Internet Of Things

With technology now touching nearly every aspect of consumers’ lives, the Federal Trade Commission wants to put more focus on privacy, big data and “smart” everything. To ensure it’s capable of protecting consumers from these rapidly evolving innovations, the agency announced the creation of the Office of Technology Research. [More]