Pilot Who Failed Drug Test Can’t Try To Use DNA To Prove He Was Clean

Steven Depolo

Imagine you’re one of the many American workers subject to random tests for the presence of drugs or alcohol in your system, and a test turns up high levels of heroin and cocaine. If you contend that the lab must have mixed up your urine sample with someone else’s should you be able to demand a DNA test to prove your innocence? If you’re a pilot, the answer is no. [More]

Alan Rappa

FAA Announces Two New Potential Hazardous Materials Fines For Amazon

A few weeks ago, the Federal Aviation Administration proposed a $350,000 fine against online Everything Store Amazon.com for shipping corrosive drain cleaner without properly packaging or labeling it. Now the agency is proposing additional fines for the company over other incidents shipping hazardous materials. [More]

Northwest dad

FAA’s New Rules For Commercial Drones Require Aviation Exam, Ban Night Flights

After years of waiting, it looks like the Federal Aviation Administration is finally ready to release a new category of rules governing the use of commercial drones weighing less than 55 pounds. [More]

Mike Seyfang

FAA Wants To Fine Amazon For Allegedly Shipping Hazardous Materials As Air Cargo

Because you can’t just throw anything in a plane and ship it somewhere, the Federal Aviation Administration wants to stick Amazon with a $350,000 civil penalty for allegedly shipping hazardous materials as air cargo. [More]

Patrick

FBI Lends FAA Drone Detector For Tests At Kennedy Airport

Birds pose a danger to commercial aircraft, but unauthorized drones are also a threat. Fortunately for everyone, we don’t yet know what would happen if a solid unmanned aerial vehicle collided with a jet or flew into its engine. The Federal Aviation Administration doesn’t want to find out, which is one of the reasons why they tested an FBI drone-detection system to prevent crashes. [More]

cag2012

FAA Gives First Approval For Commercial Drone Flights At Night

The news that the Federal Aviation Administration has granted approval for the first flights of small commercial drones at night might not seem like a big deal to the average person, but the move also shows how U.S. regulators are now speeding up efforts to authorize expanded uses of the devices. [More]

bluwmongoose

Senate Votes Against Minimum Legroom, Spacing Standards For Airline Seats

Earlier this year, Sen. Chuck Schumer (NY) said he would try to get federal regulators to come up with limits for airline seat size and spacing. But yesterday, his fellow senators shot down that effort. [More]

Patrick

Please Stop Flying Your Drone Anywhere Near A Commercial Jet

Recreational drones have grown in popularity in the last few years, and there are officially more registered drones than aircraft with pilots. Here’s the problem, though: even a tiny drone can cause serious problems if it crosses the path of a jet. While a plane-drone accident hasn’t happened yet, there have been some close calls, and no one wants to find out what would happen. [More]

Are Airlines Deliberately Making It Too Difficult To File Complaints?

Are Airlines Deliberately Making It Too Difficult To File Complaints?

When you ask someone “How was your flight?” you never expect to hear too many positive things. At best, you’ll get an “Oh, fine,” but often the question will spark a detailed list of everything that went wrong. And yet, only about one out of every 43,000 air travelers in the U.S. ever file a complaint with the Department of Transportation. And airlines aren’t exactly leaping at the chance to tell customers how to file this sort of complaint. [More]

FAA: There Are Now More Drones Registered Than Piloted Aircraft

FAA: There Are Now More Drones Registered Than Piloted Aircraft

What’s that in the sky — is it a bird? A plane? No, it’s a swarm of drones, blacking out the sun as they rise as one to push other aircraft out of the sky. At least, that’s the vision we got after the Federal Aviation Administration announced that drone registrations have now outstripped registrations for piloted aircraft.

[More]

The CARES harness in use by children who are not related to this article.

American Airlines Should Not Have Told Family They Couldn’t Use FAA-Approved Safety Harness

Consumerist reader John and his wife were traveling with their two-and-a-half-year-old daughter on an American Airlines flight from New York to San Diego, and they’d brought along a special device to help keep their toddler safe, a CARES (Child Aviation Safety Restraint System) harness. Despite the fact that it’s approved by the Federal Aviation Administration, John says the flight’s pilot refused to take off while his daughter was using it in her seat.

[More]

Drone Owners Must Register Their Unmanned Aircraft Starting Dec. 21

Drone Owners Must Register Their Unmanned Aircraft Starting Dec. 21

Nearly a month after a task force recommended the Federal Aviation Administration require drone hobbyists to register their unmanned aircraft, the agency has finally solidified a process to keep tabs on the flying devices.  [More]

FAA Task Force Recommends Requiring Registration For All Drones

FAA Task Force Recommends Requiring Registration For All Drones

A task force directed by the Federal Aviation Administration to recommend guidelines for drone operators has announced the results of its work, issuing a report today that covers which unmanned aircraft will need to be registered before taking to the skies.

[More]

FAA: You Don’t Need To Pay Someone To Register Your Drone

FAA: You Don’t Need To Pay Someone To Register Your Drone

When you go to register your car, you don’t shop around at different companies and then pay one to perform that service. The Federal Aviation Administration wants you to know you don’t have to fork over cash to register your drones, either.

[More]

Feds Investigating After 20 Laser Strikes Aimed At Aircraft Reported Across The U.S. In One Night

Feds Investigating After 20 Laser Strikes Aimed At Aircraft Reported Across The U.S. In One Night

Federal investigators have been kept busy this year investigating laser strikes at the nation’s airports, but in just one night, their workload jumped by quite a bit: more than 20 laser incidents were reported overnight between Wednesday at Thursday, at airports across the country.

[More]

Walmart Asks The FAA For Permission To Test Drones For Home Delivery, Curbside Grocery Pickups

Walmart Asks The FAA For Permission To Test Drones For Home Delivery, Curbside Grocery Pickups

Amazon isn’t the only retailer on the market that wants to get into the drone delivery game: Walmart filed paperwork with the Federal Aviation Administration today asking permission to test drones outside for home delivery, curbside pick-up and duties around the warehouse and parking lots.

[More]

FAA Investigating Report Of Drone Flying Near Approach Path Of JetBlue Flight In The Process Of Landing

FAA Investigating Report Of Drone Flying Near Approach Path Of JetBlue Flight In The Process Of Landing

In another incident causing an anti-drone ripple in the airline industry, a JetBlue flight in the midst of landing in Fort Lauderdale this morning reported seeing an unmanned aircraft flying near its flight path. [More]

(via Charlotte Observer)

Pilot Flying As An American Airlines Passenger Caught On Video Texting During Takeoff

Where there are rules, there will inevitably be people who break them. But it’s still surprising when someone who’s tasked with enforcing those rules is instead doing exactly what they usually tell others not to do. That was the case for a man flying on American Airlines recently, who filmed an airline pilot traveling as a passenger on a flight from Charlotte to Tampa texting on his cellphone during takeoff.

[More]