Steven Depolo

Legislation Would Give FDA Mandatory Authority To Recall Drugs

Last month, the Food and Drug Administration confirmed that it had found varying and elevated levels of a potentially deadly toxin in teething tablets sold under the Hyland’s brand. Despite the dangers posed by the tablets, the FDA couldn’t order a recall of the products — and the manufacturer refused to. But that could change in the future, as recently introduced legislation would give the agency the authority to order mandatory recalls of drugs and homeopathic products.  [More]

Muffet

When you stick your face into a fresh bouquet of Valentine’s Day flowers and take a deep whiff, you’re not expecting to inhale a bunch of cocaine. That would be a huge problem, and one that flower exporters in South America are working hard to prevent in order to protect their business (and your noses). [More]

Joel Zimmer

Decades-Old Drug Approved By FDA, Gets 7,300% Price Hike

Last week, the Food and Drug Administration announced that a drug previously not officially available to patients in the United States had been approved. Deflazacort, a corticosteroid, has been shown to be useful and life-prolonging for patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a rare and fatal disease. Its U.S. launch has been delayed, however, after lawmakers questioned the dramatic price hike that came with its debut here. [More]

U.S. Customs and Border Protection

Dressing Marijuana Up As Fruit Is Apparently The New Trend In Illegal Drug Shipping

Drug-busting has had a particularly fruity theme in Texas lately, where U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials have recently uncovered large loads of marijuana disguised as innocent produce. [More]

Senators Want To Know Why Price Of Lifesaving Drug Went From $690 To $4,500

Senators Want To Know Why Price Of Lifesaving Drug Went From $690 To $4,500

As you’re probably all too aware, the U.S. is in the midst of an opioid epidemic, meaning that some life-saving overdose treatments have become crucial tools for hospitals, law enforcement, first responders, and families of addicts. At the same time, the makers of one such vital drug have raised the price by more than 600% since 2014, drawing the attention of lawmakers who want to know why. [More]

Feds: Drug Company Delayed Cheaper Generics By Flooding The FDA With Paperwork

Feds: Drug Company Delayed Cheaper Generics By Flooding The FDA With Paperwork

Given that a brand-name prescription drug stands to lose a significant chunk of its market share once a lower-price generic becomes available, you can understand why a drug company would want to do anything it can to delay the cheaper alternative, even if you disagree with their intentions. We’ve seen companies accused of paying millions to stave off competition through alleged “pay for delay” deals, and we’ve also seen examples of “product hopping” to prevent competitors from entering the field. Now here’s another method for keeping generics off the market: allegedly flooding the Food and Drug Administration with pointless paperwork. [More]

TLFagan

Federal Prosecutors: Drug Ring Sold Heroin Through Facebook, Snapchat

Legitimate businesses aren’t the only people using social media to reach customers, and online drug sales apparently aren’t relegated to darknet markets. Federal prosecutors say an alleged drug ring operating in Atlanta took advantage of various social platforms to advertise and accept heroin orders. [More]

CVS Selling Generic Alternative To EpiPen For Fraction Of The Price

CVS Selling Generic Alternative To EpiPen For Fraction Of The Price

Until the recent launch of the generic EpiPen, the only affordable competitor available to the emergency allergy treatment was Adrenaclick, but that drug was hard to find and some pharmacies charged nearly as much as they did for EpiPen. Now CVS says it is selling two-packs of an authorized generic of Adrenaclick at about one-sixth of the price tag for brand-name EpiPen. [More]

Harris County Sheriff's Office

Man Wants Police to Apologize For Confusing Sock Full Of Kitty Litter With Meth

Quick! Do you have a sock filled with kitty litter sitting in your car? We’re not going to ask why you’d have such a thing (that’s your business), but you may want to remove it, lest law enforcement mistake it for methamphetamine. [More]

PhotoFM

Your Marijuana Delivery Service Might Be Extra Busy This New Year’s Eve

If you live in a state where marijuana is legal in some form, you might be looking forward to bidding 2016 goodbye and easing into 2017 with your favorite bong or a fresh batch of pot brownies. You won’t be the only one: marijuana deliveries are expected to spike on New Year’s Eve. [More]

The.Comedian

Did Big Pharma Hire Dozens Of DEA Officials To Reduce Scrutiny Of Opioid Painkillers?

It’s not uncommon for folks at federal agencies to cash in on their public sector connections by taking a high-paying job with a company they used to regulate. But when it comes to the pharmaceuticals industry’s hiring of dozens of Drug Enforcement Administration officials, the question is whether these former DEA staffers were being hired because of what they could contribute, or because it was better for the industry to get them out of law enforcement. [More]

Homeopathic Treatments To Be Held To Same Standards As Other Health Products

Homeopathic medicine is a billion-dollar business, with some of the biggest names in retail selling treatments that contain few — or no — active ingredients, like the CVS brand “Homeopathic Constipation Relief” that is nothing more than a 40-proof mixture of alcohol and water. In spite of the lack of actual medication or supporting evidence, some products still make claims that they can actually treat ailments or relieve pain. Now the federal government is confirming that homeopathic items will be held to the same standards as other products on drugstore shelves. [More]

DEARTH !

Yesterday, voters in nine states voted on ballot initiatives related to marijuana — decriminalizing it, regulating it, taxing it, or legalizing for either medical or recreational marijuana use. So who voted yay, dude, and who voted nay? [More]

Mike Mozart

Generic Drug Companies Could Soon Face Criminal Price-Collusion Charges

The pharmaceuticals industry has come under heavy scrutiny in recent years for soaring prices, though much of the attention has focused on name-brand drugs with no or minimal competition. However, multiple news reports now claim that some generic drug companies could soon face federal criminal charges over allegations that they colluded on price. [More]

Edward Kammerer

Is Migraine Relief Worth $83 Per Pill To You?

While you might pay any amount of money for relief in the middle of a migraine headache, patients and insurance companies alike have their ceilings. That’s why it’s a problem when drug companies take old components and combine them into a “new” drug that isn’t so new at all… if you had just bought those pills separately. [More]

WSB Radio

Pizza Shop Customer Claims Daughter Received Medication From Toy Machine

It’s always a surprise as to what you’re gonna get when you pop quarters into a toy vending machine, but there are some prizes that no parent wants dispensed to their kid. Say, blood pressure medication. [More]

My Dayton Daily News

Woman Claims Young Daughter Received Wendy’s Fries Dusted In Marijuana

Salt. That’s what most customers expect to find sprinkled on their fast food french fries. Yet, an Ohio woman says she recently received an order of fries from Wendy’s covered in something else: marijuana. [More]

Pharmaceutical Companies Accused Of Colluding To Delay Generic Version Of Popular Cholesterol Drug

Pharmaceutical Companies Accused Of Colluding To Delay Generic Version Of Popular Cholesterol Drug

If you’ve got a patent-protected drug that’s bringing in more than $1 billion a year in sales, you stand to lose a significant chunk of that revenue when the patent expires and lower-cost generic versions come on the market. A California prosecutor alleges that a number of drug companies illegally colluded in a nearly decade-long “pay-for-delay” deal intended to prevent the release of a cheaper competitor to a popular cholesterol drug. [More]