Bar Replies To Customer’s New Year’s Eve Complaint Of Being Ignored While Fellow Patron Has Heart Attack

Bar Replies To Customer’s New Year’s Eve Complaint Of Being Ignored While Fellow Patron Has Heart Attack

Often when we hear about a business’ response to a customer complaint spreading furiously on social media, it’s because people are shocked by the company’s response or because someone who works there was perhaps inappropriate in their reply. But when the manager of an Indianapolis bar replied on Facebook to a patron who slammed the establishment for ignoring her party’s questions about the bill to deal with an “overdosed junkie” — in reality, an elderly woman who had a heart attack — the Internet seemed quite pleased. [More]

Advocate: Additional IRS Funding Should Be “Extremely Helpful” In Actually Helping Taxpayers

Advocate: Additional IRS Funding Should Be “Extremely Helpful” In Actually Helping Taxpayers

As we approach 2016, taxpayers might be wary of dealing with the Internal Revenue Service after last year’s identity theft problems. But according to the IRS’ national taxpayer advocate, the agency is going to be much better at dealing with taxpayers than it was last year. [More]

The Caldor Rainbow

Macy’s Makes It Difficult For Me To Give Them Money Because My Last Name Is Slutsky

Meet Leonard Slutsky. He’s a Consumerist reader who had one desire: to give Macy’s money. But Macy’s wouldn’t accept his online order, simply because his last name is Slutsky.

[More]

Yes, Amazon Will Adjust Prices They’ve Raised If You Ask Nicely

Yes, Amazon Will Adjust Prices They’ve Raised If You Ask Nicely

Amazon is always adjusting their prices, and sometimes those adjustments aren’t in your favor. When you throw an item in your cart and the price suddenly rises by five or ten bucks, that’s enough to make you look for it elsewhere, or maybe not buy the item at all if it wasn’t something that you needed. Yet there is a way to get Amazon to bring the price back down: ask nicely. [More]

(pirate johnny)

Survey: Retailers Should Work To Be On Customer Service “Nice List” Year-Round, Or Risk Turning Off Shoppers

If retailers think they can be naughty all year when it comes to customer service, only to take their smiles out of storage and dust’em off when the holidays roll around, they’ve got another think coming, according to a recent survey that says customers can be very unforgiving.

[More]

Comcast Insists Its Twitter Account Isn’t A Robot; Just Assumes Everyone’s An Angry Customer

Comcast Insists Its Twitter Account Isn’t A Robot; Just Assumes Everyone’s An Angry Customer

Like a number of corporate customer service Twitter account, the public replies from the @ComcastCares account are of the “Sorry to hear that” variety, often with a request for a private direct message containing more specific account information. But are these similar-sounding responses produced by a computer script or by a human being who just assumes that everyone hates the company they work for? [More]

Comcast Tests Program That Proactively Calls Customers To Fix Problems

Comcast Tests Program That Proactively Calls Customers To Fix Problems

At times it can be difficult to schedule a service call with a cable/phone/internet provider when you notice an issue. So, it’s no wonder Consumerist reader Jack was suspicious of a voicemail he received last week from a someone claiming to be a Comcast employee notifying him that the company had detected poor signals reaching his equipment and offering to send a tech to investigate the issue.  [More]

If your TWC tech makes this face, he's probably trying to hold in some gas.

Time Warner Cable Admits Its Customer Service Stinks. Pinky Swears To Do Better

Once again, a company is attempting the tactic of being honest about the public perception of its awfulness. This time, it’s Time Warner Cable, which really wants customers — most of whom have no other choice for broadband service — to believe it gives one little bit about their satisfaction. [More]

Awesome Or Annoying?: IT Help Desk Human Answering The Phone Like A Robot

Awesome Or Annoying?: IT Help Desk Human Answering The Phone Like A Robot

It can be hard work manning a help desk and fielding questions from people all day, so we can’t really blame a New York City Health Department employee who’s taken to answering the phone in a robot voice for trying to jazz up his day a little bit. Unfortunately for Mr. Roboto, a judge has suggested he be suspended from work — for the second time — for his monotonous style.

[More]

Dish Customers Can Now Track Repair Tech’s Location, ETA

Dish Customers Can Now Track Repair Tech’s Location, ETA

In an effort to add some accountability to install and repair appointments, Dish Network has launched “My Tech,” a new feature of its MyDish.com that allows customers to see where their tech is, when they’ll arrive, and what they look like. [More]

(Jacob Grove)

Comcast Customers In Oregon Get To Experience Hopefully Improved Customer Service

A year ago this week, following a disastrous few months of very public customer service humiliations, Comcast promoted Charlie Herrin to be the Vice President, Making Company Look Less Awful (Note: This may not be his official title). The company subsequently promised that customer service “will be our best product,” resulting in more than a few snickers from Comcast subscribers. Now it’s time to see if these leadership changes and vague boasts are going to get results. [More]

AT&T Employee Says Company Turns “Blind Eye” To Lying Customer Service Reps

AT&T Employee Says Company Turns “Blind Eye” To Lying Customer Service Reps

AT&T is the second-largest wireless carriers, one the country’s biggest landline providers, and now owns the most popular satellite TV service with more than 20 million subscribers. That’s a lot of opportunities for customer service staffers at the company to mislead callers, and one AT&T employee says it happens — a lot — and that AT&T knows it. [More]

United Airlines Customer Service Reps Learn That Working From Home Comes With 20% Pay Cut

United Airlines Customer Service Reps Learn That Working From Home Comes With 20% Pay Cut

Last week, United Airlines decided to shutter two of its customer service call centers — one in Detroit and one in Honolulu — but did so without plans to lay anyone off. Instead, these airline staffers could either move to Chicago or Houston to work in a call center, or they could work from home, but with a pay cut. [More]

(frankieleon)

I Signed Up For Samsung’s “Ultimate Test Drive” And All I Got Was A Defective Phone With No Way To Return It

A few weeks ago, Samsung announced a new promotion called “Ultimate Test Drive,” wherein iPhone users (and only iPhone users) could sign up to receive a Galaxy smartphone and try it out for a month, for just a $1 processing fee. Consumerist reader Alex figured he might as well take Samsung up on its offer, and signed up to get a Galaxy Note 5 for the month. He’s now stuck with a Samsung phone that doesn’t work, no way to return it and the company hasn’t responded to any of his requests for help.

[More]

Frontier Airlines Claims To Save $1.9M By Eliminating Toll-Free Customer Service Calls

Frontier Airlines Claims To Save $1.9M By Eliminating Toll-Free Customer Service Calls

If you’ve ever run into an issue with your airline of choice, then you probably know one of the preferred ways to reach out to the carrier is through their toll-free customer service phone number. But that’s not the case anymore for Frontier Airlines, which has ditched its 800 number in order to cut costs.  [More]

Everlane is one of two brands that Facebook tested Messenger capabilities with; now other businesses will have the option, too.

Facebook Launches Feature That Lets Users And Businesses Message Each Other

After Facebook announced in March that it’d be launching a pilot program with a few brands that would let customers and companies communicate privately, the social media network said Wednesday that it’s expanding the rollout of Messenger for businesses.

[More]

Acer Takes A Week To Fix $150 Pricing Error On Its Website

Acer Takes A Week To Fix $150 Pricing Error On Its Website

It’s frustrating enough when an online retailer makes a typo that leads customers to think an item is on sale. It doesn’t help when the retailer subsequently brushes you off when you bring this error to their attention. And even after the media has pointed out the mistake to the corporate office, it will inexplicably take more time for the price to be corrected. [More]