HealthyBack Forces Free Pillows On Customer, Then Charges Him $120

HealthyBack Forces Free Pillows On Customer, Then Charges Him $120

Tony bought a Tempur-Pedic mattress from healthyback.com last December, and they sent him two pillows as a “free gift.” Tony didn’t want the pillows, but HealthyBack refused to take them back, and assured him they were part of a promotion.

United, US Airways Bill Higher Baggage Fee As A Way To Save. Huh?

United, US Airways Bill Higher Baggage Fee As A Way To Save. Huh?

United and US Airways will soon charge an extra $5 to check bags at the airport, charging $20 for the first bag and $30 for the second. Since it will still cost $15 and $25 respectively to pay for checked bags online, United thinks they can herald the chance to “prepay & save!,” while US Airways boasts that they now have a “lower fee online!”

ImLive.com: Disputing An Erroneous $450 Porn Charge Is A "Serious Violation Of Our Terms Of Use"

ImLive.com: Disputing An Erroneous $450 Porn Charge Is A "Serious Violation Of Our Terms Of Use"

Someone hacked reader E’s account on the adult site ImLive.com and bought up $450 worth of credits. By the time E. caught the charge, half of the credits had already been used. When E. informed the site that he was planning to file a chargeback with his credit card company, he was warned that doing so would be “considered a serious violation of our terms of use.” The site’s suggested alternative was simple: they would restore the used credits, and E. could watch lots and lots of porn.

Watch Out For Foreign Transaction Fees When Booking With Foreign Carriers

Watch Out For Foreign Transaction Fees When Booking With Foreign Carriers

Cliff logged on to his U.S. internet connection to use his U.S. credit card to buy airline tickets on Aer Lingus in U.S. dollars, a transaction he assumed wouldn’t incur a foreign transaction fee. Nope! Citibank slapped a 3% fee on the $2,600 purchase, something Cliff feels the airline should have warned him about.

T-Mobile Reinstates Useless $18 Handset Upgrade Fee

T-Mobile Reinstates Useless $18 Handset Upgrade Fee

Sorry T-Mobile customers, buying a new phone will cost an extra $18 now that the telecom has resurrected the handset upgrade fee killed off last December. The telecom apparently couldn’t handle going months without the cash-generating but otherwise useless fee, which T-Mobile described as “a real customer dissatisfier.”

U-Haul Forgets Customer, Forgets Guarantee, Then Forgets Extra Day Agreement And Threatens Criminal Charges

U-Haul Forgets Customer, Forgets Guarantee, Then Forgets Extra Day Agreement And Threatens Criminal Charges

Consumerist reader Dionicious and his brother tried to rent a trailer from U-Haul over the weekend. First they were faced with a closed location, then they had to ask before the company followed through on its $50 “Right Time, Right Location” guarantee. They hoped that was the end of the screw-ups, but the next day an angry employee called and threatened to file criminal charges against the brothers. Too bad there’s not some sort of $50 “We Threaten You, We Pay” guarantee.

Cox Cable Needs $40 To Change The Name On An Account

Cox Cable Needs $40 To Change The Name On An Account

It’s pretty hard for Cox Cable to change the name on your account, as Keith and his wife (the original account owner) discovered recently. First they have to disconnect your service, then reconnect it under the new name—and that probably requires all sorts of paperwork and labor. Probably hours of work! Probably someone has to drive out to somewhere and manually do something!!! That’s clearly why they hit Keith with a $20 Digital Activation Fee and a $20 Video Activation Fee.

20 Unnecessary Fees You Can Stop Paying Today

20 Unnecessary Fees You Can Stop Paying Today

Via U.S. PIRG, we came across this AP article on the enormous fees that businesses are charging consumers. After noting how much Americans pay in unnecessary fees (e.g., $14.6 billion in credit card fees last year), the author lists twenty easily trimmed fees. Our favorites, inside.

Comcast Sends Customer "Free" Self-Install Kit, Then Adds $9.95 Shipping Charge To Monthly Bill

Comcast Sends Customer "Free" Self-Install Kit, Then Adds $9.95 Shipping Charge To Monthly Bill

Hillary discovered that her money-saving free digital service self installation kit from Comcast wasn’t so free after all when she got her monthly bill. She says they removed the charge when she called to ask about it, which further reinforces our suspicion that this is a sneaky plan to pass the cost of the free kit back to subscribers. If you request a free self install kit from Comcast, watch your bill for extra charges.

AT&T Supervisor Takes Back Refund Offer Because You Dared To Question Her

AT&T Supervisor Takes Back Refund Offer Because You Dared To Question Her

Claire was told the wrong thing by an AT&T Wireless rep regarding international long distance, but when she called back to sort things out, she came up against the Nurse Ratched of the AT&T call center—a woman who refused to give in, or offer any help at all. In fact, when Claire finally admitted defeat and said she’d accept the credit that had been offered to her, the supervisor refused. Apparently Claire only had one chance to accept that and since she said no, it was off the table.

Bank Of America Charges You To Cash Its Own Checks If You're Not A Customer

Bank Of America Charges You To Cash Its Own Checks If You're Not A Customer

Bank of America doesn’t think cashing checks drawn on its own accounts is a service that should be free to no-name people who come in off the streets—they want $6 for that privilege, one reader recently discovered.

AT&T Might Charge You For "Free" Mobile-To-Mobile Calls Unless You Notice

AT&T Might Charge You For "Free" Mobile-To-Mobile Calls Unless You Notice

Jeff canceled one of the two lines on his AT&T Mobility family plan, and on his next bill he noticed the remaining line had been charged for mobile-to-mobile calls on the AT&T network—even though those minutes are supposed to be free.

EHarmony Reunites Customer With His Money, Apologizes

EHarmony Reunites Customer With His Money, Apologizes

David, who we noted earlier this week was out an extra $140 because eHarmony decided to open a second account in his name, has written back with an update.

United Promises There's No Fee, Then Takes $150 Out Of Your Account

United Promises There's No Fee, Then Takes $150 Out Of Your Account

We all know that just because a rep on the phone promises you something, that doesn’t mean it’s necessarily true. But in Alan’s case, two different United reps both confirmed, repeatedly—he asked several times before completing the purchase and again before canceling—that he could cancel his tickets within 24 hours of purchase without paying a fee. A week after he canceled, he was hit with a $150 non-refundable fee that one United rep admitted was a new policy that wasn’t in writing—but United still refused to reverse it.

Watch Out For Payment Date Errors—And Related Finance Charges—From Chase

Watch Out For Payment Date Errors—And Related Finance Charges—From Chase

Mike used an Office Depot Visa card issued through Chase to take advantage of a pay-no-interest deal through 2008. He paid off the remaining balance a couple of days before the offer period ended, but Chase still slapped him with a nearly $40 interest charge. Why? Because they’ve been “having problems like that” with Office Depot cards.

E-Harmony Gives You 58 Dimensions Of Suck By Billing You For Two Accounts

E-Harmony Gives You 58 Dimensions Of Suck By Billing You For Two Accounts

Update: eHarmony has returned the money.

Cox Agrees To Remove Undisclosed Charge, Then Changes Their Mind Without Saying Anything

Cox Agrees To Remove Undisclosed Charge, Then Changes Their Mind Without Saying Anything

Cox told reader Don that they would waive a $55 service fee they hadn’t previously disclosed, but then changed their mind without telling him. Now Cox is telling Don that if he pays the $55, they’ll return it to him as a credit next month. Yeah, sure they will. Should Don trust them?