air travel

Eric Spiegel

Travelers Left A Record $867,800 In Change At TSA Checkpoints Last Year

Sure, forgetting a few pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters might not seem like a lot to leave behind when dashing through airport security, but it adds up. To that end, the Transportation Security Administration says it once again collected a record number of change last year. [More]

Eric BEAUME

Basic Economy Flights Exist To Make You Pay More For Air Travel

If you haven’t booked any air travel recently, you might encounter something new to you the next time you schedule a trip: A new class of travel called “basic economy.” In exchange for lower fares, travelers in the basic economy section board last, can’t upgrade, and don’t have access to overhead bins. This sounds fair, but these flights may not be the great deals that they seem. [More]

JetBlue Hopes Facial Recognition Tech Can Speed Up Boarding At The Gate

JetBlue Hopes Facial Recognition Tech Can Speed Up Boarding At The Gate

For some flights, you’ll spend more time in line at the airport than you will in the air. Checking your bags, going through security, then boarding at the gate (not to mention the idle time spent in the jet’s aisle while the people in front of you invariably stow their over-large rolling suitcases improperly in the overhead bins and then remember they have to get something from that bag). JetBlue is hoping that using facial recognition technology can speed up at least one portion of this process. [More]

Giåm/a>

Bipartisan Bill Would Open Up Cuba To Tourist Travel Again

Though multiple U.S. airlines now fly directly to Cuba, tourism is not on the list of 12 travel categories that are eligible to visit the island nation. A newly introduced Senate bill with bipartisan support intends to do away with that restriction and open up Cuba once again to all Americans. [More]

Appeals Court: Your Naked Protest At Airport Security Is Not Protected By First Amendment

Appeals Court: Your Naked Protest At Airport Security Is Not Protected By First Amendment

Five years ago, when we told you about an Oregon man protesting new airport security measures by stripping down to nothing at a TSA checkpoint, we had no idea it would eventually blossom into a years-long legal battle over whether or not one has a First Amendment right to get naked at the airport, but this week a federal appeals court disagreed with a local judge, saying that the man’s protest was not a form of constitutionally protected free speech. [More]

airlines470

Amid Cancelations & Delays, Court Orders Spirit Airlines Pilots To Halt Alleged Work Slowdown

With cancelled Spirit Airlines flights resulting in fisticuffs at the nation’s airports, a federal judge has issued a temporary restraining order against the union representing Spirit pilots, hoping to get passengers moving again. [More]

Andrew W. Sieber

American Airlines Giving You Even Less Legroom On Its New Planes

You might have felt sorry for the airline industry when members of Congress literally asked why airlines “hate the American people.” After all, they’re just businesses trying to make a go of it, like the rest of us. Then you see that a major carrier has decided to give passengers even less legroom than they currently have. [More]

Congress Asks Airline Industry To Explain Why It “Hates The American People”

Congress Asks Airline Industry To Explain Why It “Hates The American People”

While no one was forcibly dragged out of room 2167 of the Rayburn Office Building during this morning’s Congressional hearing on the airline industry, lawmakers from both sides of the aisle appeared to be united (but not United) in their distaste for byzantine booking systems, lack of options, and the billions of dollars in add-on fees collected by carriers. [More]

Andrés Nieto Porras

Delta Boots A Passenger From A Flight For Using Restroom At The Wrong Time

Anyone who’s flown has heard crew say that everyone needs to be seated, strapped in, and ready for takeoff in order for the plane to taxi on down the runway take its takeoff turn. So it’s a really, really unfortunate time to develop a sudden need to go. Still, emergencies happen — but on one recent flight, Delta took the time to go back to the gate and kick a passenger off the plane after a big bout of bad timing. [More]

DieselDemon

Southwest CEO Says Airline Will Stop Overbooking Flights

Overbooking is a common practice in the airline industry, where carriers generally prefer the possibility of paying out vouchers or refunds to bumped passengers over leaving the ground with empty seats that could have been filled. But after a recent United Airlines incident pushed overbooking into the spotlight, airlines are rethinking the practice. United and Delta have raised their maximum payouts to bumped passengers, and this morning Southwest CEO Gary Kelly said his airline will soon stop overbooking. [More]

Adam Fagen

For Third Year Running, Spirit Airlines Still Scores Lowest For Customer Satisfaction

Even though Spirit Airlines ditched its loudmouthed, hate-embracing CEO Ben Baldanza, and pledged to improve performance, the discount carrier has once again come in dead last in a national customer satisfaction survey. [More]

Themarcogoon49

United Wants To Pick Up A Whole Lot More Passengers This Spring (And Not Drag Them Off Planes)

United Airlines executives had a goal for the second quarter of the year: To start from a position of strength and boost domestic growth heavily. It’s a very rah-rah, sunny, corporate view of the world that may well be derailed by one big thing: United itself. [More]

Audra Bridges

United Updates Crew Travel Policies So Passengers Won’t Be Booted Off Flights

It’s been a week since United Airlines made headlines for having a ticketed passenger bodily hauled off his flight so airline crew could have his seat, and the company is still in full damage control mode. United’s latest promise is that it has changed its policy so that last-minute staff travel arrangements won’t bump paying customers anymore. [More]

InSapphoWeTrust

United Pilots “Infuriated” By Passenger’s “Violent” Removal From Flight

Days after a United Airlines passenger was forcibly removed from his seat and dragged off a flight by Chicago Aviation officers, the union representing the carrier’s pilots is speaking out, saying it’s “infuriated” by the incident, and placing the blame squarely on security personnel. [More]

Paul McCarthy

Passenger Dragged Off United Airlines Flight Will “Probably” Sue, But Not Yet

In a press conference today, the legal team for the passenger who was forcibly removed from his seat and dragged off a United Airlines flight on Sunday by Chicago aviation officers who have since been placed on administrative leave pending investigation says the 69-year-old man will “probably” file a lawsuit over the incident, but not quite yet. [More]

Audra Bridges

United Airlines Will Compensate All Passengers Who Were On Controversial Flight

United Airlines remains in damage control mode after video of a passenger being forcibly removed from his seat and dragged down the aisle of a plane generated a public backlash. In the next step on its stumbling apology tour, United has announced that every other passenger who was on that flight will be compensated for their fare. [More]

Audra Bridges

United CEO Says Airline Won’t Use Law Enforcement Officers To Remove Passengers

When the news broke that a United Airlines passenger had been forcibly dragged out of his seat and down the aisle of a plane to make room for airline crew members, United CEO Oscar Munoz put the blame squarely on the passenger, calling him “disruptive and belligerent.” That didn’t go over well with the public, and now Munoz is doing an apology tour, promising that “This will never happen again.” [More]

Bernal Saborio G. (berkuspic)

Does The Fine Print In United’s Contract Prevent Kicked-Off Passenger From Suing Airline?

A lot of people are saying the United Airlines passenger who was forcibly booted from a Sunday afternoon flight should sue the carrier, while others say he can’t sue because of fine print in United’s 37,000-word customer contract. Turns out he probably can take the airline to court, but whether or not he’d prevail is unclear. [More]