ericbeaume

Facebook Testing Autoplay Video Ads That Have The Sound Turned On By Default

If you scroll through your Facebook newsfeed right now, you might see video ads that start to play, but silently, at least until/if you decide to turn the sound on. But according to a new report, Facebook confirms that it’s testing ads that will blast sound at full volume as soon as you encounter them. Because that’s a pleasant experience. [More]

Misfit Photographer

Ad Self-Regulation Body Refers Sprint’s ‘50% Off’ Campaign To FCC

It’s really hard to get complex ideas across during a 30-second television commercial. However, the National Adverting Division, which investigates ad claims for the industry’s self-regulation body, says that Sprint still isn’t really getting across the subtleties of its promotions for new customers switching from other carriers, and has referred the ads to the Federal Communications Commission. [More]

Facebook

Facebook Opens Up A Little About The Very Many (Many Many) Ways It Targets You

Facebook is, primarily, an advertising business. It doesn’t just want you to grudgingly put up with its ads, and it certainly doesn’t want you to block them. No, it wants you to love its ads, to embrace its ads, and to beg to be targeted to selectively.

[More]

Pinterest Will Join All The Other Social Media Platforms With New “Promoted Video” Ads

Pinterest Will Join All The Other Social Media Platforms With New “Promoted Video” Ads

When it comes to social media, sure, companies want to set themselves apart and be somehow different from all the rest. But they also don’t want to be left behind, which is probably why Pinterest is now joining the video advertising fray. [More]

Twitter

Twitter Thinks You Might Like To Slap Brands’ “Promoted” Stickers All Over Your Photos

If you looked at the last Twitter you shared on Twitter and thought, “You know, I could really use some more corporate branding on here,” you’re in luck: the social media platform says its teaming up with companies to offer “Promoted #Stickers.” [More]

Facebook

That Was Fast: Ad-Blocker Announces Block For Facebook’s Ad-Blocker Blocking

You use Facebook as a place to post and store photos, dumb memes, and articles about the political foofaraw du jour. Facebook uses Facebook as a way to gather direct profiles for billions of souls that can be advertised to, and as a way to make money selling those ads. There’s a natural tension there, when Facebook wants you to be the product and you would rather not. These days, that tension is evolving into something like an advertising cold war.

[More]

T-Mobile Spent The Most On TV Ads Out Of All Major Carriers Last Month

T-Mobile Spent The Most On TV Ads Out Of All Major Carriers Last Month

If it seems like commercials for T-Mobile are everywhere, you aren’t wrong. Out of the four biggest mobile phone carriers, Big Magenta was the top spender on TV commercials in July, showing a spot for what the company called its “most epic deal ever” a total of 2,288 times on broadcast and cable TV. [More]

Facebook

Facebook Thinks You Love Ads So Much, It’ll Helpfully Block Your Ad-Blocker For You

Facebook — one of the world’s largest advertising companies — magnanimously acknowledges that in your life on the internet, you’ve probably encountered some bad ads. And you almost certainly have, because online advertising can be obtrusive, creepy, and irritating to say the least. But Facebook thinks that they are so far ahead of the pack that you will actually want to see their ads, and so they’re going to circumvent your ad-blocker for your own good.

[More]

Ad Watchdog: Comcast Should Stop Claiming “Fastest Internet In America”

Ad Watchdog: Comcast Should Stop Claiming “Fastest Internet In America”

If you live in one of the many parts of the country served by Comcast, you’ve likely seen the company’s nearly endless ads claiming that its Xfinity broadband “delivers the fastest internet in America,” and the “fastest, most reliable in-home WiFi.” However, an ad industry watchdog group has asked Comcast to rein in its bragging. [More]

Feds Accuse 1-800 Contacts Of Badvertising

Feds Accuse 1-800 Contacts Of Badvertising

The Federal Trade Commission filed a lawsuit today against 1-800 Contacts, accusing the online lens retailer of making agreements with more than a dozen competitors to not compete with each other for online search ads, resulting in lens buyers paying higher prices. [More]

NBC Universal Will Make Original “Shows” For Snapchat

NBC Universal Will Make Original “Shows” For Snapchat

A number of high-profile entertainment companies are already programming content for Snapchat, but for the most part it’s repurposed stories, photos, list-icles, and infographics that has seen life elsewhere in the world. However, NBC Universal seems to believe Snapchat could be a platform for exclusive original content. [More]

Dog Food Company Accused Of Falsely Advertising It Could Extend Dog’s Life By 30%

Dog Food Company Accused Of Falsely Advertising It Could Extend Dog’s Life By 30%

As the proud pop of a pup, of course I want him to live as long and happy a life as possible. At the same time, I’d hope that any product claiming to be able to extend my dog’s years has the evidence to back up this boast. [More]

Ad Watchdog: T-Mobile Should Explain Better How ‘Ditch And Switch’ Payments Work

Ad Watchdog: T-Mobile Should Explain Better How ‘Ditch And Switch’ Payments Work

Mobile phone contracts as a business model are dying out, but there are still people under contract left out there, and T-Mobile wants to recruit them. Only an analysis by the National Advertising Review Board (NARB) shows that the carrier’s campaign aimed at these people, “Ditch and Switch,” advertises in a way that’s mostly true, but leaves a few important details out. [More]

Mark Zuckerberg

Facebook Will Let Small Companies In Emerging Markets Sell Directly Through Their Pages

In an effort to expand into online commerce in regions outside of the U.S. and Canada — and get the ad dollars that go with it — Facebook will let small companies in emerging markets sell their products directly through their account pages for free. [More]

Poster Boy

Facebook Wants To Interrupt Your Live Broadcast With Ads

Facebook Live is becoming an increasingly popular way for Facebook users to broadcast live feeds to the world, so it was only a matter of time until the social media giant tried to monetize these streams by occasionally interrupting them for commercial breaks. [More]

Expect Fewer Obnoxious DraftKings & FanDuel Ads This Football Season

Expect Fewer Obnoxious DraftKings & FanDuel Ads This Football Season

Last fall, daily fantasy sports seemed to come out of nowhere, with the industry’s two biggest players — DraftKings and FanDuel — also suddenly emerging as two of the biggest spenders on TV advertising. Constant commercials, sponsored segments on sports shows; even the final season of FXX’s The League had a bizarre, shoehorned-in season-long DraftKings subplot. All these ads brought DFS gamers to the two sites, but they also attracted the attention of state regulators, resulting in Nevada and New York being added to the list of states where DFS is not (for the moment) allowed. Now the two sites say they plan to rein in their ad spending and make ads that don’t play up the aspects that make DFS look a lot like gambling to some people. [More]

Cancer Centers Tripled Ad Spending In Last Decade; Are They Pushing Hope Or Hype?

Cancer Centers Tripled Ad Spending In Last Decade; Are They Pushing Hope Or Hype?

If you watch cable TV — especially basic cable during the daytime — you’ve likely seen your share of heartwarming ads showing off cancer survivors who were saved from the brink by the handsome physicians and nurses at [Fill In The Blank] cancer treatment center. Over the last decade, direct-to-consumer marketing by cancer centers has soared, with much of that spending concentrated in the hands of about two dozen operators. However, some doctors are concerned that these ads aren’t selling patients on the reality, but on the experiences of a few rare cases. [More]

Warner Bros. Paid Popular YouTubers To Post Positive Clips About Video Game

Warner Bros. Paid Popular YouTubers To Post Positive Clips About Video Game

Being a “social media influencer” must be a pretty sweet deal: People send you free stuff, and pay you money just in the hopes that you’ll say nice things about their products. Problem is, those companies can get into trouble if the influencers don’t properly reveal that they were paid for their commentary. [More]